Illinois Stealing Bee Hives, and how it relates to the American food supply.

Petite Valentine Petite Valentine
An Illinois beekeeper and researcher charges he had his hives "stolen" by the Illinois Department of Agriculture. This would sound like a case of a local squabble between a farmer and the government, except the beekeeper, Terrence Ingram, has spent 15 years researching Roundup's effect on bees, and the conclusion his research was heading towards is that the herbicide (which Monsanto is trying to genetically graft onto seeds, ergo plants, ergo the food supply) causes Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and is detrimental to the environment and consumers.

The Illinois Department of Agriculture insisted Ingram's hives were infected with a highly contagious disease, foulbrood, and ordered them burned. Ingram claimed that the inspectors were incorrect:

"Inside a honeybee hive is one of the cleanest places you can find. Anything that is a problem, if the bees can't remove it, they cover it with propolis, which is an antiseptic… When you go into the comb and cut it up, disturb it like the investigators did, then send it to a lab, it exposes foulbrood to the world. In the beehive, it's covered up. The bees aren't affected by it. But you can find it by sending it in to a lab."

Before he could get his day in court to challenge the Department of Agriculture, they seized the hives (while Ingram wasn't home), and supposedly destroyed them. He didn't get a court hearing until three weeks later.

At the hearing, inspectors couldn't produce any evidence of the infection, nor could they show proof of what was done with the bees and the hives.

You can read the full article here: What's Behind Illinois Stealing Local Hero's Bee Hives?

Is this a case of gross FDA incompetence or Monsanto pulling strings behind the scenes?
07/10/2012
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EvilHomer EvilHomer
Quote:
Originally posted by Petite Valentine
An Illinois beekeeper and researcher charges he had his hives "stolen" by the Illinois Department of Agriculture. This would sound like a case of a local squabble between a farmer and the government, except the beekeeper, Terrence Ingram, ... More
Where did you get the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) out of that article? The only agency mentioned is the Illinois Dept of Ag.

That being said, there is no reference to anything the court found, which would give a clearer view than speculation. But, from the appearances it looks like there is at least a degree of incompetence.

If the bees were truly infected and that infection posed a serious and immediate threat beyond that one hive then the government might have the authority to take action prior to a hear.
07/10/2012
Petite Valentine Petite Valentine
Quote:
Originally posted by EvilHomer
Where did you get the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) out of that article? The only agency mentioned is the Illinois Dept of Ag.

That being said, there is no reference to anything the court found, which would give a clearer view than ... More
Whoops! You're right, I was trying to abbreviate "Illinois Department of Agriculture" and wrote "FDA" instead of "IDA" — Freudian slip?

As for the infection, the man has been a beekeeper for over 50 years. If an infection capable of killing off the colony was spreading through his hives, I don't think he'd ignore it. He had enough experience on the matter to have his opinion taken into account, and the case brought before a judge. It's called "due process" and the IDA trampled all over it.
07/10/2012
Total posts: 3
Unique posters: 2