Interactive trans*/ queer activity to teach others

fizzygato fizzygato
I have to give a presentation/ facilitate an activity that requires lots of audience participation and that simultaneously teaches about trans*/ queer things.

I was wondering if any of you all had ideas of what I could do??

Everyone I've asked so far keeps saying I should draw a spectrum on a board and have everyone put their gender on it, but I don't like the idea that there's a such thing as a gender spectrum at all. Help!!!

I feel like I know a lot about trans* and queer things, but not in ways that could involve interactive learning, like I could rant about them forever, but not in a way that has an audience do things

Ideas?
02/03/2013
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GONE! GONE!
Yeah, I can't think of anything. =/ Anyone else?
02/04/2013
Genderfree Genderfree
Curious, I noticed you typed Trans*/ twice. I was wondering why the dash was there, is that a typo or something I am unaware of?

My idea is to ask people what they describe as gender... what makes you think of male? What makes you think of female? I think a great way to start a discussion on trans* and queer issues is to start with the marginalization of gender in our society.

I have plenty more ideas, so if that doesn't get your brain juices flowing I'll be back to this thread.
02/05/2013
TransMarc TransMarc
It don't think it fits your needs, but later you might want to do a LARP like this one: link
Only incarning trans* people and without the AIDS theme. It might helps them if they have to act as a character, to understand how others similar to the character but who aren't acting are, think and feel... It might not work for everybody, but somehow while acting you appropriate the feeling of the character, even if in your head you thought they as a person would just be faking it, and understand better. My shrink made me role-play family with and without my parents, which worked for me to understand them better, so this would be a more "gamey" idea. Hopefully it helps.
02/06/2013
Genderfree Genderfree
Quote:
Originally posted by TransMarc
It don't think it fits your needs, but later you might want to do a LARP like this one: link
Only incarning trans* people and without the AIDS theme. It might helps them if they have to act as a character, to understand how others similar to ... More
I agree. Personal stories are very empowering, as well. I feel like a lot of people aren't open to hearing the facts about trans* individuals until they have heard a story that makes them listen and care.
02/07/2013
fizzygato fizzygato
Quote:
Originally posted by Genderfree
Curious, I noticed you typed Trans*/ twice. I was wondering why the dash was there, is that a typo or something I am unaware of?

My idea is to ask people what they describe as gender... what makes you think of male? What makes you think of ... More
I used trans* then just happened to put a slash to mean "also" or "and." ha, one of my last editors on EF criticized me for that, and said I should just say "and" instead. It's totally cool, ha but something I never noticed about my writing style until it was pointed out to me

Thanks for the ideas. I think that could really be a good way to get diverse ideas from a crowd; everyone may have different opinions on what makes someone a certain gender label. I just worry the crowd wouldn't think it's fun; I hope they're not like, "Ew, discussing? I'd rather go to zumba."
02/07/2013
LoganAshlee. LoganAshlee.
There is an awesome gender spectrum diagram if you search on Google tag people in it on Facebook and then people will understand what you mean
02/08/2013
novanilla novanilla
You could put up big pieces of paper with words like "gender," "sex," "sexual orientation," and have people write in them their own definitions, and then go over them and talk through things.
02/08/2013
Ilmenskie Ilmenskie
The LGBT+ group at my college would do an activity at the beginning of every year where they'd give small groups pieces of paper with words and definitions on them and you had to match them up. At the end, we'd go over the answers and people could ask questions about words they didn't recognize which I thought was really enjoyable and informative
02/08/2013
Genderfree Genderfree
Quote:
Originally posted by Ilmenskie
The LGBT+ group at my college would do an activity at the beginning of every year where they'd give small groups pieces of paper with words and definitions on them and you had to match them up. At the end, we'd go over the answers and people ... More
That is enjoyable! But like I said, sometimes it's hard to have people that might not be as interested in the issues be involved with that sort of activity and still being involved. At that sort of activity, where it's an LGBT group, you have that mutual understanding that you are there to support each other. I'm not sure what situation the OP is talking about, whether it's to LGBT individuals or not; but what I have found out about coming out to my parents/grandparents is that a lot of people do not have the basis to even begin to grasp all of the terms and meanings. For example, my grandparents assumed that the reason that I was transgendered was because I watched porn at a young age. Of course, it was not a comment meant to attack me as a person, just a comment that was concerning the fact that they thought that being transgendered was some sort of perversion. That sort of though is more common than you think. A lot of people simply don't view us as human.

Sorry, I'm going off on a rant; I'm sure you understand where I am getting at by now.
I'm having to do something very similar with my mother right now, educating her about trans* issues!
02/10/2013
Total posts: 10
Unique posters: 7