What is your birth month?

jjis123 jjis123
Also, a full term is 40 weeks and that's 10 months not 9.
Answers (public voting - your screen name will appear in the results):
Jan
P'Gell , Rossie , snowminx , DawnStar , Stagger13
5  (6%)
Feb
kendra30752 , Martiniman , emilia , BlooJay , Ryanne , SneakersAndPearls , Allstars316 , LauraE , Gary
9  (10%)
Mar
rihanne , Gone (LD29) , Gleb , Cindi025 , Hazeleyes2012 , never shy , 783883877299373783 , Rory , woodsdragon , damnbul12 , Alyona
11  (12%)
April
The Vixen , notxsorry , lacybutton , big b , sillylilkitten , wanderer5964 , Kitka , Girly Juice , Gdom , twelve13 , SecretKinksters , KinkyKatieJames , peachmarie
13  (14%)
May
Britt&Rich , Silverwinds , surreptitious , Herzer , Vanille , bellum , Eugler , CountryPrincess
8  (9%)
June
eri86 , ginnyluvspotter , Intrepid Niddering , 1001 Pleasures
4  (4%)
July
jennifur77 , Hummingbird , sktb0007 , SassySam , Messedupmakeup , MrWishyWashy , Stinkytofu10 , BrittaniMaree
8  (9%)
Aug
bayosgirl , I Am Sherlocked , Jax Jackson , MyDragonBabies4 , LexiKitten , Adnerbmw
6  (7%)
Sept
wetone123 , Wicked Wahine , SourAppleMartini , XxFallenAngelxX , violets , Airen Wolf , SilverMinxxx , ViVix , Allison.Wilder
9  (10%)
Oct
padmeamidala , PropertyOfPotter , richsam , PeaceToTheMiddleEast , Cat E. , AKsTreasure , angelcrossmarie1 , Feisty
8  (9%)
Nov
Trysexual , sunkissedJess , His scarlett , Msmueller
4  (4%)
Dec
Noelle , Chelynn67 , 02022013 , Ouroborean , Living Doll
5  (6%)
Other (cause it's always here)
Total votes: 90
Poll is closed
03/12/2013
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jennifur77 jennifur77
July here.

I figure there will be a spike in births in late June/early July this year for the East coast. (nine months after Hurricane Sandy.)
03/13/2013
bayosgirl bayosgirl
I was born in August. I've noticed a lot of people seem to be born in late summer, probably because it coincides with winter, i.e. people getting frisky indoors.. I'm pregnant and my own baby is due in August, too--he'll be the 4th generation Leo!
03/13/2013
MrWill MrWill
They've already proven this point in surveys/census data.

A lot of fucking happens in the winter months, so a lot of babies are born August/September/Octob er.
03/13/2013
I Am Sherlocked I Am Sherlocked
August for me. lol
03/13/2013
Hummingbird Hummingbird
I was born 9 months to the day from when my fols married.
03/13/2013
kendra30752 kendra30752
Quote:
Originally posted by jjis123
Also, a full term is 40 weeks and that's 10 months not 9.
I was born February 26th.
03/13/2013
Martiniman Martiniman
February here, leap year baby no less.
03/13/2013
Gleb Gleb
Mar
03/13/2013
Trysexual Trysexual
Nov
03/13/2013
P'Gell P'Gell
I was born in January, but I was a month early. My dh was born in October, and my kids were born in June, August and October (but the October baby was due in November, being a month early.)


As far as I know (working as a Maternal Infant Health nurse) the most common month for births is September. This is followed by August, June and July.

The problem is too many babies born recently were born due to artificial forms of labor induction and "planned" C Sections, so most births in the last 10-15 years do not go the full 40 wks. Of course, when you say "40 weeks" you are started the "pregnancy" on the FIRST day of a woman's last menstrual period, so technically, OB considers "charting the pregnancy" to start (logistically, not clinically) about 2 wks before the baby was even conceived. Medicine and science understand the difference between this timing and what actually, clinically determines "pregnancy." THAT means a fertilized egg implanted into the wall of the uterus. Clinically, "fertilization" is NOT considered pregnancy. I'll explain why later.

Taking into account it can take up to 10 days for a fertilized egg to implant in the uterus and then turn into a clinical "pregnancy." The TRUE definition of "pregnancy" is when a fertilized egg implanted in the uterine wall, NOT conception, which is the common and commonly naturally disposed of, meeting of sperm and egg.

A good half or more of all fertilized eggs are simply discarded by the woman's body naturally, as being judged genetically inferior for carrying. This natural method helps healthier babies being born. This natural method is an other reason why methods like IGF, IVF and GIFT have a MUCH higher rate of pregnancy and fetal health issues than natural conceptions. What ever egg ripens first and any sperm they can catch with the tip of the syringe are plopped together, not allowing Nature to make the decision on the strongest, best or highest quality cells, as happen with natural, untampered with conceptions. Although these methods may be the only way some couples can have children at all.

Years ago, when these methods were newer, most doctors would have a couple try for at least a year or two before suggesting external methods of assisted conception. Now, many doctors and clinics (who make MONEY from fertility "problems") will suggest IVF or even more complicated forms of assisted conception after only ONE cycle where the woman doesn't conceive naturally.

The average pregnancy today is less than the old standard of "40 weeks." It's more like 37-38 wks, although so many OBs simply schedule inductions and C Sections for when they are convenient, we have terrible problems with "immature" and premature babies being born.

So, birth date has really little to do with when the baby may have been implanted.

But, as it is, September is the month more babies are born than any other. That means Dec or January are the months most common for conception.... maybe...
03/13/2013
Mwar Mwar
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I was born in January, but I was a month early. My dh was born in October, and my kids were born in June, August and October (but the October baby was due in November, being a month early.)


As far as I know (working as a Maternal Infant ... More
Thanks for the info! I enjoyed the read!

I have a question (which you don't have to answer). What do you think about certain forms of male infertility that is inherited? In some situations where ICSI is used? Do you think it's okay for couples to conceive children knowing full well in some situations that their children will also have trouble with fertility?
03/13/2013
Britt&Rich Britt&Rich
I was born exactly 9 months after my father's birthday. Creepy...
03/13/2013
PropertyOfPotter PropertyOfPotter
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I was born in January, but I was a month early. My dh was born in October, and my kids were born in June, August and October (but the October baby was due in November, being a month early.)


As far as I know (working as a Maternal Infant ... More
Half of this was exactly what I was coming here to post! Thank you!
03/13/2013
Hazeleyes2012 Hazeleyes2012
Friday makes 48 not fun.....
03/13/2013
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Mwar
Thanks for the info! I enjoyed the read!

I have a question (which you don't have to answer). What do you think about certain forms of male infertility that is inherited? In some situations where ICSI is used? Do you think it's okay for ... More
ICSI is where one single sperm is injected into a single egg. In some cases, it is the only way a couple desiring a child can have children. But, it circumvents Nature's way of choosing the best egg and best sperm available. (Although they do try to grab the liveliest sperm, there is more to it than that when Nature does it.) Is it hereditary? I really don't know. (My specialty is women and children's health for the most part.) Many forms of male infertility are due to illness or injury but most are simply not known.

IMO, if a couple wants a child, they shouldn't worry that that child might be "infertile" because it's not a common thing to pass on. (As most infertile people don't have children and many forms of infertility are not hereditary.)

My own mother had two reasons for secondary infertility, she had endometriosis (which I also have) and PCOS (which I do not have, but both can be hereditary.) Despite the endo, I was able to get pregnant whenever I wanted and had no trouble with infertility, so she may have passed on the endo, but not the infertility. (I was my mother's only successful pregnancy. It took her 2 years to get pregnant with me, then she miscarried when I was a 9 month old baby and, despite her and my father never using any form of birth control (devout Catholics) she never got pregnant again. After her divorce from my father she married a man with two children, as my father married a women with one, so I do have step siblings.)

I think if people are going to be responsible parents, of course it's OK for them to conceive IF they want children, are able and willing to take care of them and are willing to do what it takes to have babies. There are thousands of hereditary illnesses and conditions and if everyone who was in fear of passing anything on didn't have children, we'd most likely have no children at all.

I do think that many types of fertility treatments are overused. The case of people being referred for IVF or Clomid after only trying for one month, or women in their late 40s (who have about a 2% or less chance of being able to carry a pregnancy) being given fertility treatments. I have some strong ideas about this, the whole, "Ooops, I was too busy to have children, so I'll try to have them in my late 40s." works for men, but IMO, it's not only dangerous for women to be pregnant at this age, but not a great idea in other ways. The success rate for women over 43 in most fertility clinics is less than 5%, but they'll take your money and load you up with hormones, even though the chance of a pregnancy is relatively low. One of our patients had an egg donation and had a set of twins at 52. She'll be SEVENTY when they graduate from High School. IMO, that isn't fair to the children.

But, again, it isn't my decision. I think fertility treatments, especially high level treatments like GIFT, embryo donation and ICSI should be reserved for really unusual cases.

OK. Off soap box, now.
03/13/2013
sktb0007 sktb0007
Quote:
Originally posted by jennifur77
July here.

I figure there will be a spike in births in late June/early July this year for the East coast. (nine months after Hurricane Sandy.)
I'm in July too
03/13/2013
bayosgirl bayosgirl
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I was born in January, but I was a month early. My dh was born in October, and my kids were born in June, August and October (but the October baby was due in November, being a month early.)


As far as I know (working as a Maternal Infant ... More
People need to quit being afraid of saturated fats and cholesterol, not necessarily spend $$$$ on fertility treatments. These NUTRIENTS produce hormones, without which conception, maintenance of pregnancy and breast feeding could never happen.

I'm not saying to eat a pound of butter a day, but there are people who restrict fat content in the name of "health" to the extent that they're replacing wholesome, natural fats with fake fats like butter alternative "spreads" that are full of cheap refined oils. Even if they're not hydrogenated, they're still bad for the body. Any excess of polyunsaturated oils-canola, soybean, sunflower/safflower oil...all bad for the body. It's better to eat full fat products in reasonable amounts. They don't "clog arteries" like we've been led to believe, and just might save couples a ton of heartache and wasted cash.
03/13/2013
richsam richsam
Quote:
Originally posted by jjis123
Also, a full term is 40 weeks and that's 10 months not 9.
i was born in oct
03/13/2013
SassySam SassySam
Quote:
Originally posted by jennifur77
July here.

I figure there will be a spike in births in late June/early July this year for the East coast. (nine months after Hurricane Sandy.)
I bet your right.
03/13/2013
SassySam SassySam
I was born in july, and since I love the summer It's perfect for me.
03/13/2013
sunkissedJess sunkissedJess
November baby here
03/13/2013
Jax Jackson Jax Jackson
I was born in August, about nine months after thanksgiving.
03/13/2013
big b big b
on the first fools baby
03/13/2013
PeaceToTheMiddleEast PeaceToTheMiddleEast
I am a October baby.
03/13/2013
wanderer5964 wanderer5964
april for me
03/13/2013
surreptitious surreptitious
Quote:
Originally posted by jjis123
Also, a full term is 40 weeks and that's 10 months not 9.
I always hated having May as a birth month - in my middle school class of 16 (I was in French immersion, so it was the same from 6th through to 8th grade), 8 of us were May babies. Born on the 8th, 10th, 12th, 16th, 20th, 23th, 30th and 30th (yes, two on the same day, even). It was ridiculous.
03/13/2013
never shy never shy
Quote:
Originally posted by jjis123
Also, a full term is 40 weeks and that's 10 months not 9.
Born in march about 9 months after my dads bday guess I was bday booty
03/13/2013
783883877299373783 783883877299373783
March 22nd. I was 2 weeks late.
03/13/2013
BlooJay BlooJay
February
03/13/2013
Total posts: 65
Unique posters: 62