Expensive shampoo..does it make a difference?

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Expensive shampoo..does it make a difference?

bayosgirl bayosgirl
So this past weekend I got a haircut at a new salon and the stylist commented that my scalp is a bit dry and flaky. I'd heard so before, but never paid much attention because it's not that bad..not like I have flakes on my clothes or anything, just a bit on my scalp. She asked me what kind of shampoo I use and I told her: usually organic, sulfate-free shampoos, currently a brand called "Gud" which is made by Burt's Bees. Anyway she said that's not good enough and I should be using a "professional" shampoo like Paul Mitchell. She tried to sell me a bottle-$18, yikes-and me being the bargain hunter that I am, I politely turned her down with the intent to shop around online. I didn't find it any cheaper but found another PM formulation at my local grocery store for $11 so I picked it up. Going to try it tomorrow. My question is, do you guys think expensive/salon brand shampoos actually make a difference, or is it just hype? For me I personally think that diet makes a bigger impact than something you put on your hair for a minute and then rinse off, but that's just me.
10/16/2012
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Lildrummrgurl7 Lildrummrgurl7
Quote:
Originally posted by bayosgirl
So this past weekend I got a haircut at a new salon and the stylist commented that my scalp is a bit dry and flaky. I'd heard so before, but never paid much attention because it's not that bad..not like I have flakes on my clothes or ...
I find that different shampoos definitely work differently with my hair but it has nothing to do with price. The most expensive shampoo I've used left my hair SUPER greasy even after washing it. I hated it.
10/16/2012
potstickers potstickers
I agree; price isn't always an indicator for how well a product will work with your hair. Have you tried requesting samples from different companies to see if their products will work for you? You can email companies and they'll send a sample or a coupon for their product.
10/16/2012
K101 K101
Quote:
Originally posted by bayosgirl
So this past weekend I got a haircut at a new salon and the stylist commented that my scalp is a bit dry and flaky. I'd heard so before, but never paid much attention because it's not that bad..not like I have flakes on my clothes or ...
No absolutely not. There's only ONE thing that sets all shampoos at any price apart and its the ingredients. It's never going to have actual extra benefits unless it's natural. I know it sounds crazy, but I've been there too many times.

There are only two shampoos that have actually stood apart from the expensive "high quality" ones and it's a professional shampoo I use after bleaching to help the color not turn dull or reddish and an all natural one. Both are around $4-7. That salon quality crap tht you can buy in-salon and at drugstores never adds more benefits to your hair. Check the ingredients -- they're selling it for high prices because it's "salon quality" but the ingredients reveal the same mess you find in dollar store or drug store brands! Not that they're awful, but I do like to try and stick with *some* healthy, beneficial ingredients.

I do have one shampoo that's cheap as heck and I adore it. It's fabulous for a lot of hair products like tons of hairspray or just easily oily hair. It's called DAX and it's like $3! It's one of my fav shampoos, and certainly, by far one of the best out there for removing build up, product or keeping oily hair non-oily.

I also use a repair mayo and some other repair cream from DAX. The Hair Mayo is in an orange container and the other is in a purple one, but I cannot remember the name of it. Ugh. All are very cheap and fabulous though. Nothing at all like the stuff you find in-salon. I actually just used the Mayo tonight to help repair my recently bleached hair, and it works miracles!

Paul Mitchell -- my advice is you're smart not to fall for that. I've had no better results with any Paul Mitchell product than drugstore. Gud actually does do nice body butters -- LOVE them, but if you take a look into Burt's Bee products these days, they aren't what they claimed. They were bought out by some other company like P & G or something like that and are no longer the healthy, natural products they once were - I recommend looking them up.

It's ridiculous that she tried selling you something like that. I understand her job position, but there's no way I could push something I knew was a waste of $ on a customer. I'd recommend finding a new stylist even (yes, even that far) if you're a regular. You don't want someone who's only worried about making more and more money because they won't have your best interest in mind as a hair-customer.

There are plenty of good cheap shampoos that have nice benefits for your hair and are again I must say, CHEAP!
10/16/2012
Synthete Synthete
Quote:
Originally posted by bayosgirl
So this past weekend I got a haircut at a new salon and the stylist commented that my scalp is a bit dry and flaky. I'd heard so before, but never paid much attention because it's not that bad..not like I have flakes on my clothes or ...
I'd be skeptical - it sounds to me like she was just trying to sell you the products, which stylists get a commission for. If you're happy with your hair/ scalp and with the shampoo you're using, keep using it! If you think she's right about the problem, I assure you there are MUCH cheaper solutions. There are salon products and drugstore products that are formulated for different types of hair and different problems, and using a different type of shampoo can definitely make a big difference, but there's no need to splurge on the salon brand if you can't find it for cheap. Just look for a drugstore product that's formulated for dry scalp treatment, maybe read some reviews before you pick it up if you're unsure, and save yourself some money!
10/16/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
I can't use pretty much any cheap shampoo. I've tried loads of them and they left my hair frizzy and not so soft. I use Living Proof now and a ton of other products I won't go into listing, all of which are higher end. My hair stays mostly frizz free and is very soft and healthy.

That said, she was probably trying to sell you something. You'll really need to play around to see what works. I used to use Aveda (another pricey brand) and it didn't work well for my hair. So high price doesn't automatically make it a better product.
10/16/2012
Intrepid Niddering Intrepid Niddering
Technically, yes, it can make a difference, to some people. Everyone's hair is different, though. If a less expensive shampoo works in your hair, that's great. Some people, they need the more expensive products.

I have very long, very thick, very coarse hair. The cheap-o bottles of Suave and the like are simply not compatible with my hair. They leave it incredibly tangled and feeling generally weak. But my sister can use it all no problem.

Some people, their hair does not like silicones. I tried to go silicone free. My hair hated it. I need silicones in at least my conditioner.

As for conditioner, some people wash their hair with only conditioner because shampoo is too damaging for their hair. Occasionally, they'll wash with a clarifying shampoo to get rid of any build-up, but for the most part, they wash only with conditioner. If I do that, my hair gets too much moisture and it gets very stretchy. But others, it's the perfect amount of moisture for them. If you choose to wash with conditioner only, you're better off having two conditioners. One very thin conditioner to wash your hair, then a thicker one to condition your length if you feel you need it.

If your hair does get too much moisture (it feels limp, mushy, very stretchy), it means you need some protein in your hair to counter-balance it. On the other hand, if you get too much protein (it feels dry, brittle, crunchy), you need to increase the moisture you give your hair.

All that said, you just need to try out products and stick with them for a bit to see how they work with your hair. If you don't see any difference at first, just be patient and keep using it. Your hair takes a while to get used to new things. If your hair responds very negatively to it very soon after using it, I'd stop using that product, then. I've been told to stick it through, as well, because your hair still needs to adjust and figure out how to react to it, but frankly, if my hair is not doing well with a new product, I don't want to continue torturing it with said product. I've been growing my hair for far too long to do anything like that.

So. How do you know what you need when? It varies from person to person. As for me, I keep this on hand at all times:

1. Dandruff Shampoo. I get horrible dandruff if I don't use it.

2. Moisturising Shampoo. To give me moisture when I need it.

3. Protein Shampoo. To give me protein when I need it.

4. Thin Conditioner. To conditioner-only wash, or to mix with another conditioner, or for use on my scalp, if needed. (Yes, I said that conditioner-only doesn't work for me, but I can do it occasionally if my hair needs the moisture. I just can't do it all the time.)

5. Thick conditioner. Used in combination with other conditioners, or on the hair from the nape of my neck to my breasts.

6. Thicker conditioner. Used in combination with other conditioners, or on the length of hair from my breasts to my hips.

7. Thickest conditioner. Used in combination with other conditioners, or on the length of hair from my hips down to the ends.

The longer your hair is, the older it is, the more moisture it usually needs. Occasionally, I may swipe a pea to a dime-sized amount of coconut oil through the length of my hair when it's wet. That's about as much as my hair can handle without getting oily. I know some that can slick a good tablespoon or so through their hair and it just soaks it all up. The trick is to start with the least amount possible and move up from there. I chose to ignore that advice the first time I oiled my hair. I figured, "My hair is so long, I'll need that tablespoon of oil." I should have listened to directions. >.<

The only other products I keep on hand are a moisturising detangling spray, a "smoothing cream" which is basically various oils in some other products that I got as a free sample (coconut oil alone gives me the same result, so I won't likely purchase that stuff after it's gone), some gel thinned with water in a spray bottle, and a bottle of mousse. The gel and mousse are products I use for only a certain hairstyle.

As for your flake issue, maybe trying a light dandruff shampoo could help. Or if you want to stick with something more natural, maybe a tea tree oil shampoo, or even just some tea tree oil itself. I've heard that that helps against dandruff. Just play around with stuff and see what works for you.
10/16/2012
Jesyra Jesyra
Personally I recommend Organix or the Loreal Sulfate-Free line. Neither are cheap, but they also aren't the super expensive types.
10/16/2012
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Unique posters: 8