Have you experienced sleep paralysis?

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Have you experienced sleep paralysis?

Falsepast Falsepast
"Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people who are either falling asleep or awakening from sleep temporarily experience a sense of inability to move, similar to that which occurs when an arm or leg goes "to sleep", but not associated with numbness." - Wikipedia

i have and it is terrifying.
09/14/2012
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Rin (aka Nire) Rin (aka Nire)
I have it on occasion, usually when the weather is too warm. It's very unpleasant and sometimes scary. On top of this, I'm prone to delirium when I have a fever, and whether it's the heat or waking from a dream or both, I almost always have minor hallucinations when sleep paralysis happens.

I've found that, if I keep my cool and try to remember what's actually happening, it's not as bad. Attempting to wiggle my toes also seems to help things along and end the episode more quickly.
09/14/2012
wdanas wdanas
I used to have this pretty bad, but it's eased up over the last few years. It's a terrifying sensation, especially when you're not quite awake. It would pass much more quickly when I didn't try to fight it, but that was hard to remember at those times. I'm glad it's not such an issue anymore.
09/15/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
This happened to me the other day for the first time. I was terrified. I would try to move my arm and I could see it in my semi-dream state move up above my actual arm. My actual arm wouldn't move. Same with the rest of my body. It was so awful.
09/15/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
I have experienced this in the past. It is very scary. I have had the full "incubus phenomenon" with the feeling of a "presence" in the room, being pushed into the bed or crushed, and sometimes a weird sense of sexual arousal. I've even seen things coming "at" me, heard my name called, heard "things" coming down the hall along with clicking, banging or hissing noises and it used to scare the living crap out of me.

I'm sensitive to paranormal phenomenon, but even as a child I KNEW this sleep paralysis (even though I didn't know what it was called) was NOT paranormal.

My neurologist says it's more common in people with migraines, epilepsy and other neurological issues. But that anyone can experience it when they are stressed, not sleeping well or ill.

My children have all experienced it, my middle daughter (who also has migraines, as all my kids do) has it the worst. She's learned in recent years how to shake herself out of it.

I was put on a medication for anxiety control and migraine prevention called Klonopin. Since I've been on the Klonopin, it waned and has virtually stopped all together. My neuro said he was starting to prescribe Klonopin for severe, unrelenting sleep paralysis, based on my experiences (kind of using me as a study subject) and has had good results with it. He said some of his patients experience it every night or every morning. (Mine were more common in the morning, when I would wake up and then fall back to sleep.) He says it's, in easy to understand terms, when "half the brain is asleep (causing hallucinations, as dreams) and half the brain is awake (being able to open your eyes and look around." The dream state is superimposed on reality, leading to a terrifying phenomenon.

I only take a quarter of a milligram of Klonopin a night and it controls some of my constant anxiety and almost all of the sleep paralysis.

I feel strongly that most people who think they have been "adbucted by aliens" or only have "haunted house" phenomenon when they are alseep are most likely experiencing sleep paralysis.

Look at alien type "abduction" stories; sleeping, hearing something approach you, down the hall or from the window or door, weird noises (popping, hissing, crackling, banging) a "presence" entering the room, then being assaulted. All of these correspond with reports of "alien abduction." My neuro was impressed with my deduction and said he was interested in investigating more reports of this phenomenon. (He's a sleep specialist (also a migraine and chronic pain specialist) and has the laboratory to do the research for this phenomenon.

Anyway, this is an interesting thing, but really nothing to be afraid of. It isn't paranormal, but can scare you terribly. There is medical care if you experience SP more than occasionally. Some people are afraid to sleep because this might happen. But there is a way to treat it.
09/15/2012
remember.me remember.me
Yes, it is no fun but its very random and not that often!
09/15/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I have experienced this in the past. It is very scary. I have had the full "incubus phenomenon" with the feeling of a "presence" in the room, being pushed into the bed or crushed, and sometimes a weird sense of sexual arousal. ...
It's interesting that you mention taking Klonopin for this issue. I take Xanax as Klonopin makes me loopy. Apparently the Xanax didn't stop it. I wonder if it's Klonopin specific and not benzo specific?
09/15/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
I also wanted to add a few links to information about SP. I also tried to correct "abduction" to alien "abduction" phenomenon.

Here's a short article about SP from WedMD. It gives a basic explanation of this problem and assures you it isn't anything dangerous or paranormal.

Here's a famous painting showing what people experience during SP called "The Nightmare" by John Fuseli created in 1781. Notice the "demon" is sitting on her body, preventing movement. Obviously, this problem has been around for a long time, as it is a glitch in REM sleep and many people experience it.

Wikipedia has a very detailed explanatory article of this problem. It explains who gets it most often and even why it's more common while lying on one's back.
09/15/2012
anonkitty anonkitty
Yup. It was creepy (I also had the "strange presence in the room" sensation), but I knew about the phenomenon (and was actually kind of amused that I finally experienced it since I just had a discussion of it in one of my psychology classes), so I just went to sleep. =]
09/15/2012
Ex-prude Ex-prude
I have not but it happens to my boyfriend all the time. He's terrified of it.
09/15/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
It's interesting that you mention taking Klonopin for this issue. I take Xanax as Klonopin makes me loopy. Apparently the Xanax didn't stop it. I wonder if it's Klonopin specific and not benzo specific?
I think it may be not only Klonopin specific (as Klonopin works differently than most benzos) but also user specific. It doesn't work for everyone.

Some doctors use antidepressants for it, but I found some antidepressants (especially tricyclics, but even a few SSRIs) caused more sleep paralysis episodes. I was on one tricyclic, years ago when I was in college, where I would have to sit on the end of the bed and wait for the visual "cobwebs" to clear before I got up to walk. It was an unpleasant drug to be on (Vivactil) but even years later, The Diamond Headache Clinic still uses it for some patients. Bleh.

I only take a sub clinical dose of a quarter of a gram a day of Klonopin, before bed. It's such a small dose, but my neuro thinks it works for most parasomnias, as well as some of the anxiety as well as migraine control. It's a med that serves many purposes for me, and I rarely take more than a quarter of a milligram, although I'm authorized to take twice that, if I feel I need it. I rarely take more.
09/15/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I think it may be not only Klonopin specific (as Klonopin works differently than most benzos) but also user specific. It doesn't work for everyone.

Some doctors use antidepressants for it, but I found some antidepressants (especially ...
Okay, well I took a nap and this happened to me again. Now I'm even more curious as to how to make it stop...

My doctor discussed Vivactil for me once. For depression though, not for my migraines. Glad I didn't take it now.

I didn't know Klonopin worked on headaches as well. Now I'm extra sad I can't take it as all my migraine meds no longer work.
09/15/2012
Taylor Taylor
I haven't. Sounds scary though.
09/15/2012
PeaceToTheMiddleEast PeaceToTheMiddleEast
I have had it in the past but not recently. It is really scary though.
09/15/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
Okay, well I took a nap and this happened to me again. Now I'm even more curious as to how to make it stop...

My doctor discussed Vivactil for me once. For depression though, not for my migraines. Glad I didn't take it now.

I ...
I'm sorry you're going through this. Sleeping supine (on your back) seems to increase the phenomenon. So does being overtired, having sleep apnea, migraines, BiPolar, narcolepsy etc.

It seems to go in cycles, it may burn itself out in a few days or weeks, or you could talk to your doctor to see what else you could try for parasomnias.

I know I have gone through it so many times and so has my middle daughter, that some of the time we can "shake" ourselves out of it, but not always.

I wish I had a cure for you. I would mention it to your neurologist, if you are seeing one, or your regular doctor.

I hope it stops soon for you.
09/15/2012
svalentine;) svalentine;)
Quote:
Originally posted by Falsepast
"Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people who are either falling asleep or awakening from sleep temporarily experience a sense of inability to move, similar to that which occurs when an arm or leg goes "to sleep", but not ...
nope
01/26/2015
svalentine;) svalentine;)
Quote:
Originally posted by Falsepast
"Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people who are either falling asleep or awakening from sleep temporarily experience a sense of inability to move, similar to that which occurs when an arm or leg goes "to sleep", but not ...
01/28/2015
michael scofield michael scofield
Quote:
Originally posted by Falsepast
"Sleep paralysis is a phenomenon in which people who are either falling asleep or awakening from sleep temporarily experience a sense of inability to move, similar to that which occurs when an arm or leg goes "to sleep", but not ...
Omg Yes! I never met anyone who has tho. I have at it happen to me many times although it has been a while I would say it has happened just once in the last year. I always wake up in the middle of the night or early in the morning my eyes are open and I'm awake but I can't get up or speak or anything! It is very scary experiencing it and I'm always shocked that it has happen but I still can't remain calm and I scream for help well I try to but it is no use I'm completely paralyzed. It can last anywhere from half a minute - a minute but it is very scary and feels like an eternity.
04/30/2015
Total posts: 18
Unique posters: 12