How accepting are YOU? Family

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How accepting are YOU? Family

Cherrylane Cherrylane
So I had to take this short questionnaire by the Pew Research Council for a class I'm currently taking on family and thought I'd share.

link

It's only 7 multiple choice questions about what you think of various changes in family structure. At the end it compares what you answered to the population at large.

It said I'm more accepting than 97% of society, which was the "most accepting" of anyone in the class.

How accepting does it say you are? Does it seem accurate to you/is it about what you expected?
01/17/2012
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Cherrylane Cherrylane
Also, just to put it out there...

Naturally there are some problems with validity and reliability, among other things, but I figure it's fun and interesting all the same.

I definitely noticed some variances in my class with the reasoning people used to answer the questions. Some people who scored as much less accepting than me had reasoning I 100% agree with, but interpreted the question in a different way and answered differently than I did. One example is in the last change about interracial marriage. One person cited answering "not much difference" because she didn't think race has anything to do with whether someone will be a good parent.

There's not an ounce of that I disagree with, and if I had answered the question according to what impact I felt it had on parenting, I would have answered the same thing. But instead I answered about what I thought that change does/would represent in society at large (less racial discrimination and de facto segregation, for example). So, although I do not think an interracial marriage is better than an intraracial marriage, I think more interracial marriage (particularly considering the racial and ethnic composition of this country) would be "good for society."

If you had a different way of interpretting the questions or reasoning behind your answers, I'd be interested in hearing
01/17/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
I got 97% as well. I guess I'm tolerant? I dunno. I don't deal well with change in general, but I'm accepting of different beliefs so long as people don't try to mess with mine in return. I figure I'll handle my family in the way that's best for my family and others should do the same. *shrug* I guess that's a form of acceptance.
01/17/2012
jc123 jc123
I got a 42%. I don't think of myself as closed-minded. They must not give much weight to my "doesn't make much difference" answers.
01/17/2012
wrmbreze wrmbreze
I got 98%. The only one I thought would be really bad was the single parent one. I feel like being a single parent, who has to work and take care of kids leaves too much to chance regarding the children. I am married and I still have a hard time getting everything to work out like I want it to. I am not sure if I could be a single parent.
01/17/2012
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by jc123
I got a 42%. I don't think of myself as closed-minded. They must not give much weight to my "doesn't make much difference" answers.
The number isn't how accepting you are- it's how you compare to the opinions of a sample population representative of society.

And like I clarified in my second post, there is a BIG difference in the kind of answers people give and what scores they get based on how they may have answered differently due to the simplicity of the questionnaire. There's no way to know how the precise reasoning you used to answer each one or your interpretation of the question itself was different than the people you're being compared to.
01/17/2012
EvilHomer EvilHomer
I got 55% but if I change everything that I marked as "doesn't make much difference" to "good thing for society" that score jumps to 94%. I left the ones I marked as "bad thing for society" alone between the two.

To me there is no difference between two people raising a child married or unmarried, the only difference is a piece of paper and some some legal right (which can be obtained other ways). You can guess my view of unmarried cohabitation from that.

Same goes for the interracial marriage, race shouldn't have a thing to do with it (I say shouldn't because the truth is in many cases it does).

I think the working mothers of young children outside of the home is a poorly worded question, I think it should focus on A parent staying home not particularly the mother.
01/17/2012
Mihoshi4301 Mihoshi4301
I got 68%. I don't think it was because I was intolerant, I think it was just because there were things that I didn't think mattered very much.
01/17/2012
EvilHomer EvilHomer
Oh and just so everyone knows, feel free to take it multiple times and compare results, they have already done the real survey and this is simply how you compare against the results they collected.
01/17/2012
ddd masturbator(bye all!) ddd masturbator(bye all!)
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
So I had to take this short questionnaire by the Pew Research Council for a class I'm currently taking on family and thought I'd share.

link

It's only 7 multiple choice questions about what you think of various changes in ...
I was not at all surprised by my score. I would be interested to see more on the background of what people voted, but fun.
01/17/2012
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by EvilHomer
Oh and just so everyone knows, feel free to take it multiple times and compare results, they have already done the real survey and this is simply how you compare against the results they collected.
Yup!

And the only problem with your suggestion is that men/fathers working outside the home isn't a change that's occurred. "A/one parent working outside the home" isn't a change to be measured, as a man working outside the home while the mother stayed at home to raise kids was the standard for quite a long time. There are increasingly instances of some men staying home to parent instead of women, but once again that's different than what that particular question was trying to address, which was the changing role of women in the workplace and family institutions. Excluding men was intentional, and to me at least, seems well reasoned.

I DO think they could have been a lot clearer about what the "main idea" of the questions were supposed to be. As previously mentioned... multiple times, and as it seems from several of the people who have already responded, how you interpret the question can change a ton about how you answer and in turn what score you get. I could think of ways in which I would answer "good for society" for every single one, as well as a way to interpret it in which I would have been able to respond "doesn't make much difference."
01/18/2012
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by ddd masturbator(bye all!)
I was not at all surprised by my score. I would be interested to see more on the background of what people voted, but fun.
link

Here's a more "in depth" breakdown about the findings of the real survey and what you're being compared to.
01/18/2012
Moein Moein
I got: You are more accepting of changes in family structure than 55% of the public.
01/18/2012
Ansley Ansley
I am 91% more accepting of these things than the public. I'm of the personal mindset that children need role models of both genders, not just one or the other.
01/18/2012
Ms. Spice Ms. Spice
I got a 94%.
01/18/2012
M121212 M121212
I found it hard to answer those questions because they're so intricate. They're really questions that are more conducive to starting a conversation rather than clicking a button. I chose "I don't know" for comments like more women having children without partners, because it really could go either way. It could be better or worse....
01/19/2012
Rossie Rossie
I got a 30%, said I'm a skeptic.
01/19/2012
Shellz31 Shellz31
Wow, I got 98%. I didn't have any issues answering - the choices where quite easy in my opinion.
01/19/2012
KyotoAngel KyotoAngel
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
So I had to take this short questionnaire by the Pew Research Council for a class I'm currently taking on family and thought I'd share.

link

It's only 7 multiple choice questions about what you think of various changes in ...
It said 94% for me, seems pretty accurate.
To me a family isn't defined by some cliched husband+wife+2.5 kids nonsense, but rather by how the members interact with one another. If the people involved are happy, and care enough to support the other family members through the bad times and laugh with them during the good that's what makes a family.
01/19/2012
Total posts: 19
Unique posters: 14