Do you think that with all the oil drilling, they are the cause of our recent earthquakes?

BrittaniMaree BrittaniMaree
we just had 2 earthquakes today starting to worry a bit what do you think about this?
Answers (public voting - your screen name will appear in the results):
yes they are causing the quakes
sunkissedJess , Jenny Swallows , bog , falalena
4  (20%)
no they are not causing quakes
Ciao. , MrWill , leanright69 , padmeamidala , Chastity Darling , RedFreak , Lowl , Ansley , jackie.jfky , Fluke , Mr. E , Ryuson , vanilla&chocolate , Allstars316
14  (70%)
I don't really care about it
other
joolie , cowboywill87
2  (10%)
Total votes: 20
Poll is closed
04/16/2013
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Ciao. Ciao.
While I'm not a proponent of oil drilling short of some localized low level earthquake activity I would doubt that drilling is responsible for the more major recent earthquakes which have happened in areas known to be tectonically active.

Now there are plenty of other environmental issues with the oil industry, so I'm certainly not giving it a free pass...but large scale earthquakes are probably not its fault.
04/16/2013
MrWill MrWill
Brittani, I live in North Texas so I'm not too far from you. I felt the big earthquake in our area however long ago.

I've also worked and been around the oilfield all of my life. I don't believe fraccing has anything to do with the quakes.
04/16/2013
Chastity Darling Chastity Darling
No. I am not overly familiar with oil drilling but I have a hard time believing it causes earthquakes. May have to research this a bit...
04/16/2013
RedFreak RedFreak
can't do nothin bout nature
04/16/2013
Lowl Lowl
no not from drilling
04/16/2013
sunkissedJess sunkissedJess
I may not know a lot about this at all, but I think that the drilling could have something to do with it.
04/16/2013
Jenny Swallows Jenny Swallows
It really wouldn't surprise me - ecologically and geologically speaking, the planet is as delicately balanced as our bodies, and it only takes the smallest thing to send everything off-kilter.
04/16/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Jenny Swallows
It really wouldn't surprise me - ecologically and geologically speaking, the planet is as delicately balanced as our bodies, and it only takes the smallest thing to send everything off-kilter.
I really have a hard time with that line of logic. What, exactly, is off-kilter? When it comes to the Earth, if there is anything that is consistent it is change in either small, unnoticeable ways or in really, really big ways. I certainly believe that humans leave an imprint in their environment but I'd have to be pressed pretty hard to believe that the Earth won't be able to recover from anything we do.

Regardless of all of our compounds, plastics, metals and gasses we're responsible for, they are still comprised of the elements naturally found here. When it's all said and done, if humans are ever extinct, the Earth will right itself just as if we had never existed in the first place. Chernobyl is an excellent example of this.
04/16/2013
Fluke Fluke
I'm with Stormy on this one. The Earth is gigantic and has a tremendous capacity for absorbing and sustaining itself. Scientists are absolutely clueless as to what causes major shifts in the Earth let alone relatively small things like earthquakes and twisters.
04/16/2013
Ryuson Ryuson
I agree; it may cause SUPER localized earthquakes, especially if there was some 'bubble' of earth that settled, but in the scheme of things a bit of drilling shouldn't affect the tectonic plates.

None the less, it's hard to tell what does and does not affect the shifting of those plates. It could be a super slow process, not at all related, or anything in between. The earth is one of those things that's hard to understand, especially because we've
a) been around for such a SUPER short period of time
and b) humans evolved at one of the most stable times on the earth EVER, in regards to extinction, global heating/cooling, and tectonic activity.
04/16/2013
joolie joolie
I don't know,but it sounds like the premise of a disaster movie.
04/16/2013
vanilla&chocolate vanilla&chocolate
Tectonic plate movement and related mechanisms cause earthquakes. Oil drilling may be a catalyst; I wouldn't rule it out, but the tectonic movement has been happening long before oil drilling began.
04/16/2013
bog bog
Quote:
Originally posted by BrittaniMaree
we just had 2 earthquakes today starting to worry a bit what do you think about this?
"USGS’s studies do not suggest that hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as 'fracking,' causes the increased rate of earthquakes. USGS’s scientists have found, however, that at some locations the increase in seismicity coincides with the injection of wastewater in deep disposal wells."

tl;dr The drilling itself, which utilizes thousands of gallons of water, does not cause earthquakes, but disposing of that water does cause earthquakes.

So, yes, it is indisputable and scientifically proven.


source: US Department of the Interior
04/16/2013
Allstars316 Allstars316
No I don't think that is the reason. It is just how earth is changing.
04/17/2013
falalena falalena
Quote:
Originally posted by BrittaniMaree
we just had 2 earthquakes today starting to worry a bit what do you think about this?
changing the geological structure is guaranteed to cause earthquakes.
04/17/2013
Total posts: 16
Unique posters: 16