Serious Question for the Guys and Gals here who know "small engine" stuff!!!

Serious Question for the Guys and Gals here who know "small engine" stuff!!!

Bignuf Bignuf
Since this is a diverse and amazingly bright group, I am hoping someone might have an answer for this question. I cannot find a lot on the internet about it.

How do I "dry up" a small engine of gas, so it can sit for long storage?

I have a generator (used only for hurricane emergencies). Per the instructions, I put in a few cups of fresh gas, and ran it till it "ran dry and stopped". But there was still some gas in the tank and I have used a "turkey baster" to get out what I could. It is still "wet" in there with gas, but I am leaving the cap off, hoping it will evaporate (it is a small amount), however, I know there must still be gasoline inside the engine and I worry about that turning to "varnish" over the year or years.

I cannot reach, let alone undo any fuel lines. The whole thing is sealed in a metal housing with insulation and it would take major assembly to even get to the engine itself...even if I knew what to do, once there...which I don't.

So, with the unit still "intact", is there anything I should or can do to safely "dry up" the gas left inside or anything else I can or should do to protect this generator for long term storage?

Any advice or tips are very, very welcome.
11/30/2012
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js250 js250
What we do with our restored personal bikes is add fuel stabilizer to the gasoline. This winterizes the bikes and allows the gas a longer 'shelf life'. To remove any varnished gas, run some high octane fuel, about 1/8 cup per gallon to clear out the gummed up residue.

One question is the motor a 2-stroke or 4-stroke? (Do you mix oil with the gas or just add straight gas? If you mix oil and gas--do NOT EVER let it run til it is out of gas!!!! The last bit of gas will run severely lean and seize the motor.

I honestly know what I am doing, I own a vintage motorcycle restoration, sales and parts business. I do the stabilizer periodically throughout the year with my fully restored 1972 Yankee Z500 valued at $8700 and our $5400 Indian 50,60 and 80cc Mini Dirtbikes. Go ahead and message me if you have any questions!!
11/30/2012
married with children married with children
js250 sounds right, I would take her advice. I have never ran a engine dry. I have always used a fuel stabilizer when needed. But none of my bikes sit for longer then 6 or 8 months before being ridden again.
11/30/2012
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by js250
What we do with our restored personal bikes is add fuel stabilizer to the gasoline. This winterizes the bikes and allows the gas a longer 'shelf life'. To remove any varnished gas, run some high octane fuel, about 1/8 cup per gallon to clear ...
I seriously appreciate the advice. The motor gets straight gasoline. Separate oil tank. It is a Honda 6500 generator.

I just lost my lawnmower to "varnish" gumming up the carburetor, since it sat there for two years (Sears just fixed it), when hubby was using a lawn service. It was the guy from Sears who said to run the engine till it goes dry!!!????

I appreciate the advice about the high octane fuel, too.

Thank you.
12/01/2012
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by married with children
js250 sounds right, I would take her advice. I have never ran a engine dry. I have always used a fuel stabilizer when needed. But none of my bikes sit for longer then 6 or 8 months before being ridden again.
It may just be that I need to set up a schedule and run these motors periodically. Avoid any problems to begin with. Shouldn't take more then an hour every few months to fire everything up.

Thank you!!!
12/01/2012
Total posts: 5
Unique posters: 3