Do you think it's important to read the "Classics"

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Do you think it's important to read the "Classics"

sweetpea12 sweetpea12
I am really starting to read a lot of classic novels. I think it's really important thatI get a good foundation of positive classical novels. How important is it to you to read classic novels?? And which are your favorites?
03/08/2013
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laflauta laflauta
I think that it was worthwhile to get exposure to them while in middle and high school. They don't really impact me directly now, but the ideas that they contained were very important.

I didn't like most of the books that I read in class, but there were some exceptions. I really enjoyed The Picture of Dorian Gray, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Of Mice and Men, The Color Purple, and Don Quijote de la Mancha.
03/08/2013
Incendiaire Incendiaire
I read The Great Gatsby on the suggestion of of a friend and I really enjoyed Fitzgerald's writing style.
03/08/2013
Carawr2015 Carawr2015
It can be helpful to read the classics if you're planning on doing literary studies or enjoy thinking critically about modern literature and what could be influencing modern styles. That being said, I am of the opinion that reading the classics is not necessary for being a good reader or enjoying books any more than anyone else. Some of my favorites are Brave New World, The Color Purple, and The Great Gatsby. I would also recommend Sula.
03/08/2013
deltalima deltalima
Quote:
Originally posted by sweetpea12
I am really starting to read a lot of classic novels. I think it's really important thatI get a good foundation of positive classical novels. How important is it to you to read classic novels?? And which are your favorites?
I've read them and honestly I don't think all are important and interesting to me.
03/08/2013
Chilipepper Chilipepper
Reading yes, analyzing them in class is a no. I got more out of an independent reading class (choose from the list, answer only five question after finishing the book) than I did in literature classes - it allowed me to form my own impressions instead of being told what my impressions should be.


writeteach
03/08/2013
Ice1 Ice1
Quote:
Originally posted by Chilipepper
Reading yes, analyzing them in class is a no. I got more out of an independent reading class (choose from the list, answer only five question after finishing the book) than I did in literature classes - it allowed me to form my own impressions ...
Agreed. Having to BS my way through countless reports, essays, questions, and tests in school utterly slaughtered any pleasure I obtained through reading. It's very unfortunate, because I used to devour book after book before I had to do advanced assignments in middle school. I wish I could get back into reading, but it's still ruined for me even at the college level. I'm in an Engineering/Programmin g major, so I really don't give a flying fuck about the vast majority of what my literature classes did.

The same goes for writing, in a way. I coasted through school and BS'd all of my writing assignments for easy high grades, but I loathed everything I wrote. It wasn't fun or helpful. It was horrible and mind-numbing.

The graphic is funny. My great-grandfather was an author in Scotland, and his books are still required reading in a lot of Scottish schools. He always lamented that the curriculum often butchered what he meant for the reader to experience.
03/09/2013
kandy anjel kandy anjel
Quote:
Originally posted by sweetpea12
I am really starting to read a lot of classic novels. I think it's really important thatI get a good foundation of positive classical novels. How important is it to you to read classic novels?? And which are your favorites?
i love classic novels always have it spurs the imagination
03/09/2013
jennifur77 jennifur77
I've read a few. If you enjoy them, that's great. I have several friends who are English professors and they have recommended books I have adored. And the look on people's face when you say the last book you read was "Frankenstein" is um, "literally classic" (pun intended). BTW, I loved Frankenstein.
03/09/2013
kendra30752 kendra30752
Quote:
Originally posted by sweetpea12
I am really starting to read a lot of classic novels. I think it's really important thatI get a good foundation of positive classical novels. How important is it to you to read classic novels?? And which are your favorites?
As a writer, I did think it was somewhat important to know some of the classics. I've taken a course in English literature and learned a lot, but really, it didn't get me any further than if I'd never taken it. I did it mostly out of pure interest. I guess I might even say I don't think it's that important. For me, I've not gained anything but some extra, useless knowledge from it. I don't regret learning it or anything, but to answer your question, I truly don't think it's of any importance at all.

When reading for pleasure, not for school or something, I never would choose a classic. They're rarely any genres that interest me. I stick to my preferences there.
03/09/2013
laflauta laflauta
Quote:
Originally posted by Chilipepper
Reading yes, analyzing them in class is a no. I got more out of an independent reading class (choose from the list, answer only five question after finishing the book) than I did in literature classes - it allowed me to form my own impressions ...
I totally agree! I vowed to myself that if I ever became a fiction author (highly unlikely at this point) that I would fill my book with unnecessary details so that English teachers thought that my book was jam-packed with rhetorical strategies. Then I could speak to schools and say "nah, I just meant that the curtains were blue. No need to read into it."
03/09/2013
SourAppleMartini SourAppleMartini
I have to agree with what has been already been said above. I feel that reading is important for general erudition. I probably wouldn't be able to have an intelligent conversation with a person who considers twilight to be a good book. However I don't think that over-analysing books is good for anything. Art is not science, it should be enjoyed, not dissected.
05/18/2013
gsfanatic gsfanatic
I'd say reading at least a few for fun makes sense, as long as it's a classic you'd enjoy. For example, if you aren't into sci fi, reading some of the classic sci fi authors doesn't make a lot of sense.
05/18/2013
Total posts: 13
Unique posters: 12