You're Fired!

Ansley Ansley
Being fired sucks. I think we can pretty much assume that we've all been there or had our jobs threatened in the past at some point in our lives, and if you haven't you probably will at some point in the future. The employer always has the upper hand when it comes to hiring and firing and most believe this is how it should be. But...

What if we lived in a world where the employees had the upper hand. Instead of interviewing for a company on their terms, you would interview your future boss on their effectiveness as a manager.

What kind of questions would you ask your potential future boss? What kind of manager do you enjoy working for? If you decided that you no longer wanted to be in their employment, how would you fire your boss?

(Inspired by a post I read on a blog site.)
06/14/2012
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nanamondoute nanamondoute
Ehh...that doesn't really make sense to me. Cause, people usually work from the bottom up or that they have more experience. Sure there can be bad managers, but employees would just become really lazy (or take on the role of manager) if they were given the upperhand.

And whenever people hire, I would think employees would question the employer. I know that in interviews, you should ask questions about your future position so you get a more holistic idea about how your time would be working with them.

But in any case, I would enjoy working for a manager that is organized/has good time management and is decisive. They should also be able to see the big picture rather than minute details.

If I didn't want to be in their employment...I would just quit... Maybe tell them why I want to quit (if I don't care about a recommendation down the line).
06/14/2012
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by nanamondoute
Ehh...that doesn't really make sense to me. Cause, people usually work from the bottom up or that they have more experience. Sure there can be bad managers, but employees would just become really lazy (or take on the role of manager) if they were ... More
It doesn't really matter if it makes sense or not. It's more or less, "if this is the way the world operated, how would you handle it?".
06/14/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
I disagree that managers have more experience. I've been managed by SO many people that had less experience in the field I was working in it's not even funny. In fact, in my experience, managers became managers because they were no good at something else. I've had only one or two managers that could have done my job effectively. Always irritated me, by the way. How can you tell me how to do my job better if you couldn't do it yourself?

I'd ask how they felt about life/work balance truthfully. Lots of people preach it, but when you need time off they act like you're asking them to move mountains. Most of the job threats I've had have been over time off of work.

I'd also ask about their personal ethics. If the company says to do something that they find unethical - would they do it to save their job or go against it to stick with their gut? I've been in positions where a company has come out with policies I don't agree with and I've stood my ground against managers who were too scared to get fired even though they would admit the policy was unethical.

If we could ask things outside of what's legally allowed to be asked, I'd ask if they had kids and if they had experience with mental illness. I have a son that requires me to have to leave work quickly sometimes if he's ill. I also have to miss some days if he has an event at school. Those things are important to me, but managers without kids don't get it. Since I have Bipolar I, I have lots of limitations on what I can and cannot do in the workplace. Again, without experience in that area, managers don't quite understand why it is I can't do what everyone else can and it becomes like talking to a brick wall.

I'd ask if they micromanage, since I hate that. I'd ask if this would change if the company told them they needed to micromanage to be effective.

I'd ask how they motivate their employees and why they think that works well. Some people motivate with fear or by saying "such and such is doing a better job than you." NOT motivating.

For what it's worth, I generally do try to ask these questions in interviews. They lie. They tell you what you want to hear and then do the opposite. *sigh*
06/14/2012
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
I disagree that managers have more experience. I've been managed by SO many people that had less experience in the field I was working in it's not even funny. In fact, in my experience, managers became managers because they were no good at ... More
Exactly. Which is why I thought it would be fun if we could turn the tables and put THEM on the line instead of the employees.

And, yes it has been my experience in the corporate world (not at Eden) that managers are promoted because they have (perceived) excellent people skills but suck at everything else they do. If you're good at your job, like really good and know the details inside and out, it's almost impossible to be promoted because you're irreplaceable. It's quite the catch .22.

I like that you would ask about work/life balance. I think that's something that is important to everyone these days, especially with the way companies hire and fire at rapid speed.

I've seen a couple of employee-owned corporations while traveling and I thought that was the coolest concept. They're in charge. They get to make the decisions and they all have to vote on it. I suppose that could be tedious in some cases but really effective in others.
06/14/2012
KrissyNovacaine KrissyNovacaine
I would totally be into interviewing my potential boss. I already to it with doctors and other types of services. If I don't like them I "fire" them by taking my business somewhere else.

I would want to talk to them about their work ethic. I hate bosses that are never in the office. Managers are supposed to be a resource for the employee, and when they aren't around it is extremely frustrating. Also, their ethic translates to what they expect from their employees.

Unfortunately, this doesn't work in an economy that has too much labor and not enough jobs. If things change and we have a big upswing someday this becomes slightly more realistic. Which will be super awesome.
06/14/2012
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by KrissyNovacaine
I would totally be into interviewing my potential boss. I already to it with doctors and other types of services. If I don't like them I "fire" them by taking my business somewhere else.

I would want to talk to them about their ... More
Oh I completely agree on being resources. And there is too much labor and not enough jobs. But, I think we're experiencing such massive shifts in technology that it's more that we have people who are not qualified to do the jobs that are available. That's why a ton of people are going back to school right now - to get a technical degree of some kind to be more of a commodity on the market. I think that's why it's the entire world, not just us that are experiencing down turns in the economy. Granted, we shot ourselves in the foot with that whole stock market/real estate issue. But, we can recover.
06/14/2012
Jaimes Jaimes
Where in the team do you position yourself as a leader? From in front, behind, or within?

What sort of an investment do you believe your team members are to your company?

What qualities do you believe you have as a leader?

What aspect about yourself do you wish you could change that you feel would make you a better leader?

Personally, in what sort of work environment do you want to be?

What mistakes have you made during your journey to management that you feel you have learned from?
06/14/2012
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Jaimes
Where in the team do you position yourself as a leader? From in front, behind, or within?

What sort of an investment do you believe your team members are to your company?

What qualities do you believe you have as a leader?

What ... More
Now, that's an excellent set of questions, if I must say so myself! I would love to see how they stumble over the answers. I've read so many articles on the hiring process that I'm almost dangerous. Most interviewers are ill-prepared and don't know any more about what they're doing than the candidate does.
06/14/2012
~LaUr3n~ ~LaUr3n~
"I think we can pretty much assume that we've all been there or had our jobs threatened in the past at some point in our lives, and if you haven't you probably will at some point in the future." Nope, never have!
06/14/2012
js250 js250
I am actually going to have to think about this for awhile. It has been so long since I have worked for someone else that the etiquette of job hunting is evading me a bit.

On the other hand--Stormy, if you can tell me how to fire myself and make it permanent, I would luv ya forever!!! I own one store of a nationally known sign company--not a franchise, we all are individually owned and operated. I am a bit burned out after 17 years of this.
06/14/2012
Geogeo Geogeo
I'd make sure they were cool, calm, collected people. Bosses with a temper that snap easily are the worst.
06/14/2012
Airen Wolf Airen Wolf
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
Being fired sucks. I think we can pretty much assume that we've all been there or had our jobs threatened in the past at some point in our lives, and if you haven't you probably will at some point in the future. The employer always has the ... More
This is the basis of quality management as I understand it and should be the common practice in all places of employment. You, as the worker are a commodity that should be marketed to not the other way 'round. You KNOW your value but you don't know the value of the person or persons who hold your employment in their hands. I think you SHOULD interview your potential employers just as vigorously as they interview you.

My questions would be:
Do you have a company handbook that outlines the expected conduct?
How rigorously do you enforce company policy?
Do the people who report to you find you to be easy to work for? Do you feel that they respect you? Do they consider you to be a leader, a mentor, and a good boss?
How much would someone with the job title I am interviewing for be responsible for? What are the duties of the job exactly? Is there room for growth and would you, as my manager, support my having an interest in bettering myself with this company?

I feel that a successful relationship with your immediate supervisors is a two way street and someone who resents questions like these is probably not someone I would want to work for or with!
06/14/2012
Total posts: 13
Unique posters: 9