An interesting development on plan B.

Gallowraven Gallowraven
I don't know how any of you on here feel about the plan B pill, but according to this article, Teva Pharmaceuticals is pushing the FDA this week to allow Plan-B, their popular morning-after contraceptive pill, to be sold over-the-counter, without age limits. I think in some ways this can be a good idea, but in others it could be a not so great idea. original Article

How does everyone else feel about it? should they lift the age limit? or leave it as is, so girls under 17 must have a prescription to get it?
02/11/2011
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PussyGalore PussyGalore
Hmmm. Gut instinct says, yes a prescription should be required if you are under 17 because of the high dosage of hormones and my fear that it would be used as a regular birth control method. (From what I understand the "period" from using Plan B is an all out mother-----r and a half, so maybe not? I don't know?) I'm also trying to think of the number of teenagers I knew in high school who could come up with $70 on a whim.


That's my initial reaction. I'm interested in the other responses though. I think in the end, availability isn't the issue. It's the irresponsible behavior that leads to the need for the pill in the first place that is the issue. This is specific to teenagers, not adults who simply had an OOOPS moment.

I've read so many texts on textsfromlastnight.com about chicks hooking up with a frat boy or two and not using condoms on the basis they had Plan B waiting in the wings when they got home. The STD issue right there makes my head explode. :/
02/11/2011
Tuesday Tuesday
I would love to see this made over the counter for all ages. Teenage girls don't need extra hurdles to dealing with an unwanted pregnancy. Requiring a prescription isn't to protect them, its to force them to talk to their parents. Some parents (mine, for example) would not have been helpful in that situation.
02/11/2011
Kayla Kayla
My only concern? Have they done the proper testing on how this would effect the hormones and everything in a young, still-growing body? If that's all be safe and cleared, I'm all for it. I'm a bit concerned about people abusing it, but college students would be just as likely to abuse it, so I can't say there's much of a difference.
02/11/2011
Rockin' Rockin'
I think Plan B should be available over the counter for all ages, too. And if someone wants to use it as regular birth control, that's their business, not mine. It's their body.

I think an ideal situation would involve some pharmacist counseling. I don't know if they person would need to request Plan B at the pharmacy counter or if you can just pick it up and pay for it with an ID or something. Pharmacist counseling can be very, very helpful for people to help them understand what the medication does, its side effects, and things to consider when taking the medication. I speak from experience, and appreciate the time that pharmacists take to counsel patients. I know at a lot of pharmacies there may not be "enough time" for this, but I think it could really help Plan B users to be more educated about their drug choices.
02/11/2011
Emma (Girl With Fire) Emma (Girl With Fire)
Quote:
Originally posted by Gallowraven
I don't know how any of you on here feel about the plan B pill, but according to this article, Teva Pharmaceuticals is pushing the FDA this week to allow Plan-B, their popular morning-after contraceptive pill, to be sold over-the-counter, without ... More
They already do that here as far as I know.
02/11/2011
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
I think Plan B should be available over the counter for all ages, too. And if someone wants to use it as regular birth control, that's their business, not mine. It's their body.

I think an ideal situation would involve some pharmacist ... More
They do pharmacy counseling at my pharmacy. At least if its a new prescription they require you to talk to the pharmacist. Its usually a waste of time. I can read the side effects and cautions myself.

But its not private. You're out there at the counter with everyone who is waiting for a prescription all around. A pharmacy would need a private place to talk to people with prescriptions like this.

Hormone levels change drastically right after an abortion too. Is that better? I think not. Actually after childbirth they're thrown for a loop too.
02/11/2011
~LaUr3n~ ~LaUr3n~
I am on the fence with this one.
02/11/2011
Rockin' Rockin'
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
They do pharmacy counseling at my pharmacy. At least if its a new prescription they require you to talk to the pharmacist. Its usually a waste of time. I can read the side effects and cautions myself.

But its not private. You're out ... More
"At least if its a new prescription they require you to talk to the pharmacist. Its usually a waste of time. I can read the side effects and cautions myself."

That is excellent that they require you to talk to the pharmacist. I'm sorry it has been a waste of time for you. Many people do not read the medicine bottle or the instructions thoroughly, and that can cause a lot of problems. I think a lot of people would benefit from required pharmacist counseling, and I agree that it should be in a private area (as it should be for all medications, really).
02/11/2011
*HisMrs* *HisMrs*
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
"At least if its a new prescription they require you to talk to the pharmacist. Its usually a waste of time. I can read the side effects and cautions myself."

That is excellent that they require you to talk to the pharmacist. I'm ... More
I totally agree. I don't know many people that actually read the inserts just because of the time it would take to get to the most vital info. I do patient teaching in the hospital and there are A LOT of pts who have taken the same meds for years and don't have a clue of what it does, how it works, precautions to take, etc. I do wish however that they did counseling more privately.I don't think most teenagers are worried about reading the insert. I have taken the Plan B in which I got one time from Planned Parenthood after a condom broke. I believe I was 17. The only thing I really remember from it was that the period that came after taking it was HORRIBLE! If you take plan B once you prob won't ever want to take it again! That being said, I would have to say that I'm still unsure how I feel about the whole over the counter for all ages thing.
02/11/2011
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by *HisMrs*
I totally agree. I don't know many people that actually read the inserts just because of the time it would take to get to the most vital info. I do patient teaching in the hospital and there are A LOT of pts who have taken the same meds for years ... More
Maybe I'm strange but I read he entire insert. Sometimes I go online and read the doctor's version of it, which has quite a bit more information.
02/11/2011
Angel deSanguine Angel deSanguine
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
I would love to see this made over the counter for all ages. Teenage girls don't need extra hurdles to dealing with an unwanted pregnancy. Requiring a prescription isn't to protect them, its to force them to talk to their parents. Some ... More
You said it for me.
02/11/2011
PussyGalore PussyGalore
Ok, a new concern. If it's available for all ages OTC, will this make it easier for sexual predators to molest children in their home without protection? I mean we're all worried about predators on the internet, but what about the father who rapes his daughters in the middle of the night and doesn't want a baby around to prove his crime?
02/11/2011
Annemarie Annemarie
Quote:
Originally posted by Gallowraven
I don't know how any of you on here feel about the plan B pill, but according to this article, Teva Pharmaceuticals is pushing the FDA this week to allow Plan-B, their popular morning-after contraceptive pill, to be sold over-the-counter, without ... More
I started out thinking, "Oh, well, it's great to have birth control available to everyone..." but then realized that it's already available in the form of condoms. Any age can buy condoms.

I think this would not be a good idea. I think there should be an age limit, because, really, how many 17 and unders read the fine print? How many 17 and unders know that you shouldn't use it within 3 months each time? It shouldn't be used as a regular birth control (i.e. every day, etc), and I doubt that any girl would know this.

If a girl is truly in a bind and needs it, they can go to Planned Parenthood, where it doesn't take much to get a prescription for it.
02/11/2011
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by PussyGalore
Ok, a new concern. If it's available for all ages OTC, will this make it easier for sexual predators to molest children in their home without protection? I mean we're all worried about predators on the internet, but what about the father who ... More
I doubt the lack of plan B would stop someone who wants to molest their daughter. That molester, if he gives a crap, could take his daughter to the doctor for a prescription/abortion anyway.
02/11/2011
PussyGalore PussyGalore
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
I doubt the lack of plan B would stop someone who wants to molest their daughter. That molester, if he gives a crap, could take his daughter to the doctor for a prescription/abortion anyway.
Can we stay on topic, please? Bringing something like that into it really demeans the importance of how the legislation for this drug goes down.
02/11/2011
Kindred Kindred
In response to the questions about safety, for a product to be classified as OTC, it has to meet safety standards of the intended target population, the condition it is treating must not require a physicians diagnosis to treat, and the instructions for use of the drug has to be able to be understood by the layperson.

OTC also does not necessarily mean that anyone can have easy access, it merely means you don't need a prescription. It can still be behind the pharmacy counter and my guess is it will. The cost and fear of people being seen purchasing it will make it a prime target for shoplifting if it were stocked on shelves.
02/11/2011
PussyGalore PussyGalore
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
I doubt the lack of plan B would stop someone who wants to molest their daughter. That molester, if he gives a crap, could take his daughter to the doctor for a prescription/abortion anyway.
An abortion is a whole helluva lot harder to hide than a pill and "just a bad period".
02/11/2011
Owl Identified Owl Identified
Quote:
Originally posted by Kayla
My only concern? Have they done the proper testing on how this would effect the hormones and everything in a young, still-growing body? If that's all be safe and cleared, I'm all for it. I'm a bit concerned about people abusing it, but ... More
Drugs are not allowed to be tested on anyone under the age of 18 as this has been deemed (at least in the US and Canada, I believe) unethical and is legally prohibited. So if Plan B should not be offered without prescription to minors based on the grounds that it may negatively impact developing body and brain chemistries, then literally every drug that underage persons use would have to be pulled from that age group.
02/11/2011
PussyGalore PussyGalore
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
I doubt the lack of plan B would stop someone who wants to molest their daughter. That molester, if he gives a crap, could take his daughter to the doctor for a prescription/abortion anyway.
And I never said it would stop anyone from doing anything and believing it would is a fallacy. It would make it easier to prevent pregnancy and keep it under the radar. As a survivor, it's a concern for me.
02/11/2011
Owl Identified Owl Identified
Quote:
Originally posted by Owl Identified
Drugs are not allowed to be tested on anyone under the age of 18 as this has been deemed (at least in the US and Canada, I believe) unethical and is legally prohibited. So if Plan B should not be offered without prescription to minors based on the ... More
I should correct this. Drugs are not TYPICALLY allowed to be tested on minors, and I should say NEARLY literally - I was being slightly hyperbolic so I don't want to be misinterpreted. There are times when children are included in drug trials but generally they are not approved for them. For example, psychiatric drugs are not allowed to be tested on minors but they are prescribed to them.
02/11/2011
DONOTSHOPHERETHEOWNERISPSYCHO DONOTSHOPHERETHEOWNERISPSYCHO
I can definitely see this going badly with as many states that still practice abstinence only sex education. There are a lot, and I mean A LOT, of ignorant young girls who freak out that they might be pregnant in situations where it's damn near impossible that they are. Combine that ignorance about the basics of sex with the fear that the parents she can't talk to about sex might find out that she's having sex (and might become pregnant without an emergency contraceptive), and you have got a recipe for disaster.
02/11/2011
AAR AAR
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
I think Plan B should be available over the counter for all ages, too. And if someone wants to use it as regular birth control, that's their business, not mine. It's their body.

I think an ideal situation would involve some pharmacist ... More
Well said.....I Wish there were choices like this when I was growing up...Thank goodness I did not have this problem that many teens face ...but I know some people that could have used this after their back up did not work..... I just wish teens would wait a bit longer than some do...but that's just my opinion...If being able to use this pill after an oops for teens could help reduces unwanted pregnancys than they should be able to have that option in my opinion...
02/11/2011
*HisMrs* *HisMrs*
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
Maybe I'm strange but I read he entire insert. Sometimes I go online and read the doctor's version of it, which has quite a bit more information.
Don't get me wrong I think that it's awesome that you read the entire insert and the doctor's version but the majority of the US population doesn't. You would be amazed at how many people don't know what they're really taking and what side effects to look for. Also one thing that I have learned in nursing school is that the avg. reading level of Americans is 5th grade (straight for my textbook). link Now I ask you to go read that entire insert and tell me that it is at a level that a 5th grader could read.I did an entire research paper on how people in the medical field do not teach at the level that most people understand. Not to mention those that simply can't see well enough to read. I have a friend who is legally blind- that wouldn't hinder her from going and picking up Plan B.
02/12/2011
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