If you had one piece of advice for a new reviewer...

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If you had one piece of advice for a new reviewer...

LicentiouslyYours LicentiouslyYours
What is the most important thing (or three things or thirty...) you think someone writing their first review should know?
09/08/2009
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Juliettia Juliettia
If the product has other reviews, be sure to check them out to see what types of things the reviewer includes. Too many new reviews don't give enough information about materials or compatibility. Which leads to a lower ranking.
09/08/2009
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
Aim to inform, not entertain or arouse.
09/08/2009
Avery Dragon Avery Dragon
If it was a bad product, don't leave out any details as to why it was bad. Likewise for if it is a good product. Your personal experience is important. It may bring light to a different way to use the product. However, a review shouldn't read like a porn either. There should be at least one area giving facts over the product itself.
09/08/2009
NuMe NuMe
Be thorough.
09/08/2009
Alan & Michele Alan & Michele
Ditto on all of the advise given above. Read a few reviews from our top reviewers to get a better idea of what kind of info to include before you write your first one. Always use spell check.
09/08/2009
Alan & Michele Alan & Michele
Quote:
Originally posted by Alan & Michele
Ditto on all of the advise given above. Read a few reviews from our top reviewers to get a better idea of what kind of info to include before you write your first one. Always use spell check.
rofl! And my first sentence shows exactly *why* you want to use spell check.
09/08/2009
LiftedUp LiftedUp
For me, proofreading and punctuation are important.

"I am seeing more and more new reviewers who seem to want to write like this and just incoherently ramble on and on for extended durations without giving any thought to how a sentence should be properly structured to insure that their thoughts are conveyed in a clear manner and it makes the review virtually unreadable."

Obvious spelling errors are also a big no-no. On the forums, it's not a big deal, but in your reviews these things matter. As unfounded as it may be, I've noticed that I tend to trust well written reviews, much more than poorly written ones, regardless of the writer's experience.
09/08/2009
Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
Make a list of all the points you want to hit, all the things that should be in a review. Then hit them all.

What's it for?
Does it do what it's for?
What else does it do?
How do you clean it?
How safe is it?
How long/wide/deep is it?
How does it compare in size to other toys or every day objects?
How does it feel?
How do the controls work?
What sort of buttons does it have?
What sort of lube can you use with it?

Etc. Etc. Etc.

And, for god's sakes, use the extended format for your first few reviews if you're uncertain.
09/08/2009
Gary Gary
The number one thing that I would suggest is that you just take your time. Use the toy a few times and then write your review. You don't necessarily have to sit down, write the whole review, and submit it all once.

And, before you submit it, read it again, read it twice, maybe you could also ask your friend/partner/cat to proofread it as well. Whenever I submit a review, I usually get my wife and at least one of our cats to check it out.
09/08/2009
Victoria Victoria
I have to agree most with 2 points that have already been made in this thread:

1. Take your time. Don't rush to write about something you only used for 5 minutes. Haste makes waste - or forgetful writing, grammatical errors, and such. Proofread. Digest. This review is your representation, so don't go half-hearted on it.

2. Qualify those statements. If you love it, tell us why. If it sucked, please please tell us why! Generalizations don't really tell us anything - we need details, people. No need for scientific analysis, just give us a good description of the Whats, Hows and Whys.
09/08/2009
LicentiouslyYours LicentiouslyYours
Someone once said on Twitter they had finished a review and were going to wait and send it in in the morning. I think that's probably the best advice I can think to give is "sleep on it." Then you can go back with fresh eyes and catch that word you left out or remember something you think is important to add. Self-editing has really only ever worked for me if I can step away from the computer for a few hours and "forget" what I've written.

Or as Gary said... at least have your cat proofread!
09/09/2009
Purple Foxglove Purple Foxglove
Quote:
Originally posted by Gary
The number one thing that I would suggest is that you just take your time. Use the toy a few times and then write your review. You don't necessarily have to sit down, write the whole review, and submit it all once. And, before you submit it, read ...
Hehehe kitty proofreaders.

I would suggest taking the time to look at your review (and product) from a buyers perspective. What would/did you want to know about it before you spent the money on it? What were you glad to have learned after the purchase? Is there anything you wish you would have known? Etc.
09/09/2009
Rockin' Rockin'
I'll probably come up with something more meaningful later (maybe I should think on it, heh), but one thing that comes to mind is...

Stay away from cliches and trite wordings. I'm tired of seeing that someone tried a product "to spice things up," or that it "kept me cumming back for more." You don't have to be amazingly original with your phrasing, but there are tons of ways to say things that aren't buzzwords / soundbites / catchphrases.
09/09/2009
VieuxCarre VieuxCarre
Make sure you're honest and don't post comments to other people's reviews saying "go look at mine!" That's just kind of rude, personally.
09/09/2009
SilverVixen SilverVixen
Quote:
Originally posted by LicentiouslyYours
What is the most important thing (or three things or thirty...) you think someone writing their first review should know?
When people aren't afraid to show personality it can make for a great review. You can be informative AND personable. You're not a key banger, people connect better with you and with the product you're representing when they feel like there's a real person on the other end of the review.

Another key is finding a pattern for reviewing that works for you. If it helps to make a quick diagram of your sections, do it! I usually come up with my headers first, then it keeps my review on track. I try to follow the logical progression of a product as well, especially if it's a little complex. Kind of like the top down method. Start at the top, then fill in the details. BREAK IT UP into soundbites if there's a lot of content. If you don't, it looks like one gawd awful run on sentence!

Don't write to impress anyone, it only makes you look retarded. People can usually tell when someone is trying too hard. Write to impress yourself, answer the questions YOU would have if you were purchasing the product, and remember, a majority of your audience is comprised of complete strangers. They DONT care about your (insert whatever here)... they care about whether or not the damn thing works.

Lastly, a good writer ALWAYS finds ways to make their reviews more efficient. If a review for an $18.00 vibrator takes up 5 scrolling screen pages, you WILL lose your reader. Whether it's removing excess descriptives; "that" ,"like" or "whatever"... work on efficiency. Ultimately, you're aiming for a simply stated, informative, EFFECTIVE opinion.
09/09/2009
Mamastoys Mamastoys
First of all, be sure to try out the product before you write a review. Then be thorough and include as much information as you can. Have as much fun writing the review as you did using (hopefully) the item.
Use spell check and watch the grammer. I've even had someone else read a review before posting it, especially if I've had a hard time writing it.
09/09/2009
Nashville Nashville
Make use of the properties page- refresh yourself on the material, if it's porous, make sure to say so- include what lubricants are compatible, how to clean it, if it needs condoms- this is all to help you become an expert on your own toy. No one knows it quite like you do and no one can have the exact same experience you did.

If you areunsure, give yourself a few days with the toy and retest, retry, reuse. Then sit down and make a bullet list of the good points and the bad points and weave them into your review. Some toys don't have equal bad parts and equal good parts but make sure you always find a balance. And don't try to sell readers on a toy that even you didn't like, it helps to be honest! Just because you're getting free toys doesn't mean you need to pretend it was better than it was.
09/11/2009
Darling Dove Darling Dove
Quote:
Originally posted by Adriana Ravenlust
Aim to inform, not entertain or arouse.
I wholly agree with this and Avery's post as well.

Also I'd say, look at the top rated reviewers and see what kind of info they include. Your review doesn't have to be dry either, a bit of comedy is fine as long as the review stays informative.
09/11/2009
Airen Wolf Airen Wolf
Wow such good advice! I would add that it is a good idea to try out the template once or twice to get an idea what information is deemed necessary. Read other reviews of similar products that got high reviews and read the comments. Often other reviewers will comment about info missing or unclear which will give you an idea what we as the community are looking for.

Please don't abreviate your as yur or you as u it is jarring and not professional. These are reviews meant to inform and educate not forums! Use proper punctuation and capitalization even if you are a submissive and writing to impress all of us Dominant players! You are a sub not a lesser being please use a capital I.

Let us know if you are not a fleuent english speaker...we are not ogres and are willing to assist, but a jarring retranslation using a computer matrix looks like a poorly written review, try asking any reviewer for help proof reading I'll bet you'll get a favorable response and maybe make a friend in the process!

Try the toy in as many SAFE ways as possible and educate yourself on unsafe practices so you don't inadvertently give possibly dangerous advice. A non-flared base on a dildo/vibe is not a safe toy for anal exploration....yes it can work and if you are abunduntly careful you might be fine but as ethical reviewers we should mention that it ISN'T a safe practice. Likewise condom usage as far as when, where and how!

Don't take it personally when we comment and ask questions about your review. We are either looking for the information genuinely or looking to help you expand your reviews to include info we feel is necessary. It is not a comment on your personality or on your style. If you read some of our reviews you will most likely see the same questions and comments about our early reviews...or current ones!

Have FUN with this! When you are having fun it shows in your review and makes it a joy to read! Even we older reviewers read reviews when perusing to find that next special friend so don;t be afraid to give your honest opinion.
09/14/2009
Snappy Snappy
Give the product a fair shake. Test it several times. Read the review prompts and think about your responses before you write them.
11/01/2009
J's Alley J's Alley
For new reviewers:

1. use the product several times, in different moods, with and without a partner (if you have one)

2. please do your research, read top reviewers' reviews, DO USE the extended format PLEASE, know the material and what is compatible with it

3. go over the product before use (all the boring stuff, like smell, taste, texture and so on)

4. be honest

5. take notes during one of your testing sessions (I usually do it in the first one)...really, jot your thoughts down
11/01/2009
wetone123 wetone123
Great post for new review writers. Good advice here.
04/17/2011
PersonalAngel PersonalAngel
Quote:
Originally posted by Carrie Ann
Make a list of all the points you want to hit, all the things that should be in a review. Then hit them all.

What's it for?
Does it do what it's for?
What else does it do?
How do you clean it?
How safe is it?
How ...
Im going to print this so I can see this every time I make a review
04/17/2011
KnK KnK
Quote:
Originally posted by LicentiouslyYours
What is the most important thing (or three things or thirty...) you think someone writing their first review should know?
Get a mentor. ASAP
04/17/2011
PassionQT PassionQT
Quote:
Originally posted by PersonalAngel
Im going to print this so I can see this every time I make a review
I borrowed that too and added some things to it. I have a form email I send to all students. In the long run, it will save everyone time.
04/18/2011
Total posts: 26
Unique posters: 24