For the lower ranking reviewers: About editor comments

Ryuson Ryuson
Hey there! I recently read a discussion where a few lower ranking reviewers stated that they enjoyed getting comments from their editors about what they did well and what they needed to work on. Since then I've been trying to give more feedback if I see a reoccurring issue... But I was wondering what kind of feedback you guys prefer!

I tend to go with something like this:

"Hey there! Watch out for your homophones like 'you're' and 'your,' as well as 'rite and right.' Also, you may want to try and use a few less exclamation marks; they lose their meaning if they're after every sentence!'

But I know that some editors go:

"In paragraph one I changed 'You're toy' to 'your toy.' In paragraph two I changed 'Your sure to like it' to 'You're sure to like it.' In paragraph 3 I added a comma after 'nice.'" Etc.

Which do you guys find more useful? Thanks for your input, I'm trying to be a more helpful editor!
04/17/2013
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Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
This doesn't apply to me, but I think it's a great question
04/17/2013
Gary Gary
Great post!
04/17/2013
Do emu Do emu
I usually write a list to my students on what changes they might want to make in their reviews and why they need changing. It goes along with the concept of teaching someone to fish vs. giving them a fish. If the mentor just corrects their errors, then the student is never going to learn what they're doing wrong. What if they will still be writing less than useful reviews after the program? It's not contributing to the community much if they don't learn how to write more useful reviews by themselves afterwards.
04/17/2013
TheirPet TheirPet
I prefer the first I suppose. It's nice to have someone check up on those things but I want to know whereabouts I'm going wrong so I can keep an eye out for it later.
04/17/2013
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Do emu
I usually write a list to my students on what changes they might want to make in their reviews and why they need changing. It goes along with the concept of teaching someone to fish vs. giving them a fish. If the mentor just corrects their errors, ... More
Ryuson was talking about being an editor, not a mentor. They are very different roles. Editors are meant to correct errors, and they don't work one on one with each reviewer, but only pick up reviews as they come up in the cue.
04/17/2013
Ryuson Ryuson
Quote:
Originally posted by Do emu
I usually write a list to my students on what changes they might want to make in their reviews and why they need changing. It goes along with the concept of teaching someone to fish vs. giving them a fish. If the mentor just corrects their errors, ... More
I always write about a paragraph of suggestions for each section of a review when it comes to students, but as an editor we're not supposed to be really as in depth as mentor, I feel like.

Hmm... I kind of feel like they'd just get a mentor if that was the kind of feedback they were looking for?
04/17/2013
Kallina Kallina
As a new reviewer, I would finda either manner helpful, but I am used to critiques. I think the first example is probably better for someone with a lot of grammar issues. With the explanation, it may be more likely to stick.
04/17/2013
Total posts: 8
Unique posters: 7