Do you ask your students not to apply for advanced?

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Do you ask your students not to apply for advanced?

K101 K101
A question for other mentors (mentor or not, feel free to add your thoughts): Do you ask that your students NOT apply to be an advanced reviewer until they have graduated?

I remember my mentor asking me not to do that because mentors lose out on their compensation as far as I know - once the student goes advanced? I realize that newer people may not know this and end up applying. I didn't know anything about advanced, upgrades, etc. I completely understood when my mentor asked me not to apply to be advanced. In fact, I never did apply, I just let it happen.

Number 1. It might be useful if we provided more info on what advanced means because these newer people don't know. They simply see that you can become advanced after so many votes and they want it. A lot of times I see people who say they wish they'd never applied because they weren't ready.

Number 2. Do you guys ask your students not to apply for advanced? Have you ever had one do so against your wishes?

I can understand not wanting them to apply until they're ready and until they've graduated. I see that a lot of work is put into mentoring someone if you truly care to give your best. Also, if they aren't ready to graduate yet, why do they apply to become advanced? I'm just curious because I really don't know.

I'm a new mentor and have 2 students, both of which are advanced. One of my students came and asked for the extra help and was up front about their status. She let me know that if I chose not to help her since she was already advanced, she wouldn't mind. Of course I'm not going to say no to the chance of helping if the person truly thinks they can learn from me. I thought it was kind of them to be up front though. So what are your thoughts on this? If you're going to mentor a totally new person who needs thorough help, would you ask them to not upgrade yet? Do you think it is wrong to ask that of your students?
Answers (private voting - your screen name will NOT appear in the results):
No. I don't ask my students to wait until they're finished with my class before the apply to be advanced.
In some circumstances I don't mind them applying to be advanced.
No. I ask them up front not to apply to be advanced if they want to take the class with me.
7
Other.
Other, but I have some thoughts to share in the comment section.
2
Total votes: 9 (9 voters)
Poll is closed
01/06/2012
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K101 K101
After reading back over this, it kind of sounded like I wasn't wanting to help the student who I mentioned being up front and honest about their advanced status. Just to clear up any confusion, I wasn't meaning that I preferred not mentoring an already advanced reviewer. Am I even making sense at this point? Lol. I just was curious about other students who don't tell you up front that they're going to apply and they upgrade while in your class.
01/06/2012
Kindred Kindred
I send all of my new students a message outlining my expectations of our work relationship and include helpful links. For those that are not already advanced, I do ask them to not submit their name for the community vote out of respect to me as their mentor and explain about the GC. Since I have done this, I have not had any students go up for vote. Unfortunately, I think it's just a loophole in the system and I hope EF eventually prevents it from happening with programming.
01/06/2012
Silverdrop Silverdrop
I put other, because I'm not a mentor, but my mentor asked me not to put myself up for advanced because it would happen when she graduated me. Which of course I was happy to comply with.
01/06/2012
Antipova Antipova
I'm a mentor, and I voted in the "other" category.

I mentor both students who are already advanced, and students who are basic (not advanced yet). For those that are already advanced, usually they "know the drill" and already have items that they're wanting to review. And they can't go up for vote, so no questions there.

For the basic reviewers, there's a lot more explaining to do---how they get their student assignments, and the graduation to advanced process. I usually explain that, because they are basic, they are allowed the free student reviews, but if they want to take advantage of that, then they can't use the community vote upgrade option. Basically I explain that the mentor program and the voting program were set up independently, but the software to make them exclusive of each other never got put together---so they just have to not apply to get their student items, so I get my compensation, and so they don't have their in-progress reviews lock up.

I probably talk too much (?) (students?)---but I've never had anybody go up for vote that was taking my class. So I guess it works out?
01/06/2012
Coralbell Coralbell
I ask my basic students not to put themselves up for the community vote. I explain that they will automatically become advanced when they graduate from the class, and that the voting process is for those who choose not to go through the mentor program.
01/08/2012
Ryuson Ryuson
The first student was unaware of it and applied before I graduated her, so from now on I'm going to ask them not to.
01/08/2012
Jul!a Jul!a
I give my students a short explanation and ask that they not go up for vote while in class with me because they'll become advanced reviewers once I graduate them.
01/09/2012
js250 js250
I explain that the reward for graduation is advanced reviewer status. I also explain that they lose their in progress reviews if they apply. I take advanced and basic reviewers, I just want to help whoever wants it and have even had people come back and get more mentoring a while after graduating the first time. I also work with people until they feel comfortable with their own reviews as well no matter how long it takes.
01/09/2012
Total posts: 9
Unique posters: 8