Measurements on EF- circumference and diameter?

Intertwining Intertwining
Hi everyone,

This is probably an incredibly stupid question, but I can't for the life of me figure it out:

Why is it that I can find various toys with, say, a 1" diameter, but the circumference can vary from 3" to 3 1/2"? Shouldn't they all have the same circumference?

It's been bugging me for the past couple of days, so someone please put me out of my misery!
12/11/2010
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Rockin' Rockin'
I think most of the measurements on EF are rounded to the nearest 1/4" or 1/8", which gives customers an idea of the size without having to read that something is 1.0573 inches wide.

To calculate the diameter of a toy, the circumference measurement is divided by pi (3.14159). For your example numbers, 3 divided by pi is 0.955, and 3 1/2 divided by pi is 1.114. If you round to the nearest 1/8", then 0.955 becomes 1" and 1.114 becomes 1 1/8". If you round to the nearest 1/4", then 0.955 becomes 1" and 1.114 becomes 1", too. I think it might just be a difference in rounding.

I hope that makes sense and helps
12/11/2010
Intertwining Intertwining
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
I think most of the measurements on EF are rounded to the nearest 1/4" or 1/8", which gives customers an idea of the size without having to read that something is 1.0573 inches wide.

To calculate the diameter of a toy, the ... More
YES, THANK YOU SO MUCH!

I knew the formulas for circumference, but I can't believe I didn't think about the conversion to inches- doh!

Thanks again!!!
12/11/2010
Rockin' Rockin'
Quote:
Originally posted by Intertwining
YES, THANK YOU SO MUCH!

I knew the formulas for circumference, but I can't believe I didn't think about the conversion to inches- doh!

Thanks again!!!
You're quite welcome

If you are especially concerned about how big around a toy is, I'd pay more attention to the circumference for the very reasons you created this post. You've illustrated quite well that variations in size are more easily seen in the circumference measurement than in the diameter measurement. Have fun!
12/11/2010
Kayla Kayla
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
I think most of the measurements on EF are rounded to the nearest 1/4" or 1/8", which gives customers an idea of the size without having to read that something is 1.0573 inches wide.

To calculate the diameter of a toy, the ... More
Sexy nerds are sexy. Yes, that is you.
12/11/2010
ScottA ScottA
Circumference is also a more "realistic" measurement because toys aren't always perfectly round. I have several I like that are more elliptical, and there are even more odd shapes out there (look at the Jollies toys).

Circumference is going to give how much your chosen orifice (and the muscles around it) have to expand to get the toy inside.
12/11/2010
Tuesday Tuesday
Circumference gives a much better idea of how big a toy is. Its more precise and easier to visualize. Plus since measurements are rounded to the nearest 1/4 inch, you lose more precision with diameter measurements compared to circumference.

I assume that when people give only diameter measurements its because they don't have a tape measure.
12/11/2010
Gunsmoke Gunsmoke
Circumference is important - but it assumes a toy is perfectly round and generally they are not - except maybe steel and glass. Don't overlook the subtleties of size - and read the reviews carefully!
12/11/2010
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by Gunsmoke
Circumference is important - but it assumes a toy is perfectly round and generally they are not - except maybe steel and glass. Don't overlook the subtleties of size - and read the reviews carefully!
Its diameter that assumes a toy is round.
12/11/2010
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
Circumference gives a much better idea of how big a toy is. Its more precise and easier to visualize. Plus since measurements are rounded to the nearest 1/4 inch, you lose more precision with diameter measurements compared to circumference.

I ... More
I find diameter much easier to visualize myself. That's why I use it.
12/12/2010
Rockin' Rockin'
To me, neither diameter nor circumference assumes that the toy has a circle cross section. The diameter is more useful to me because, like Adriana stated, it's easier for me to visualize. It's also more helpful to me to know the widest part of the toy instead of just how big around it is. While it's true that an orifice has to stretch to accommodate the whole toy, I'd still like to know how wide the widest part is, so I can compare it to my other toy widths and estimate if it would be a good fit for me.
12/12/2010
ScottA ScottA
I like to put both because of what Adriana and Tuesday said. Mathematically, circumference and diameter are both predominantly attributes of circles and circular forms, so if you want to get specific you'd say "perimeter" instead of circumference for non-circular forms (such as most dildos). Diameter can be attached to an ellipse as well, but it's harder to conceptualize for non-circular forms (especially when there's only one diameter given).

In the end "diameter" is a close approximation that is easier to visualize for many people.
12/12/2010
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by Adriana Ravenlust
I find diameter much easier to visualize myself. That's why I use it.
Just curious. Do you own a tape measure? I guess I just have a hard time understanding how seeing the actual circumference with a tape measure is less satisfying than trying to translate in your mind how big a toy is from the diameter.
12/12/2010
namelesschaos namelesschaos
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
Just curious. Do you own a tape measure? I guess I just have a hard time understanding how seeing the actual circumference with a tape measure is less satisfying than trying to translate in your mind how big a toy is from the diameter.
I find diameters much easier to visualize (Note the plural diameters).

Here is why: Circumference alone doesn't tell me anything about the toys shape, measurements of the major and minor axis of a toy does. You tell me toy has a circumferences of 4.0 inches, I don't know it shape from that. Tell me 1.5 at widest 1.0 at it narrowest I know it an oval shape.
12/12/2010
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by namelesschaos
I find diameters much easier to visualize (Note the plural diameters).

Here is why: Circumference alone doesn't tell me anything about the toys shape, measurements of the major and minor axis of a toy does. You tell me toy has a ... More
I've never seen both width and depth diameter measurements given here. And reviewers only use a single measurement too.
12/12/2010
Jobthingy Jobthingy
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
Just curious. Do you own a tape measure? I guess I just have a hard time understanding how seeing the actual circumference with a tape measure is less satisfying than trying to translate in your mind how big a toy is from the diameter.
I use a tape measure and often do diameter because I find it easier to visualize also. That is not to say I don't do circumference also. I guess it depends on the toy for me.
12/12/2010
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuesday
Just curious. Do you own a tape measure? I guess I just have a hard time understanding how seeing the actual circumference with a tape measure is less satisfying than trying to translate in your mind how big a toy is from the diameter.
I do--and one of them I bought specifically for reviewing. I always measure and do the math to convert to diameter. Like others, it's a visualizing thing, not a translation or number thing. It's about spacial recognition, I guess.
12/13/2010
ScottA ScottA
I "visualize" by mentally "putting my hands around it", and for that diameter is often easier. When you're operating near your limits then circumference/perimite r is the only way to go. There's just too much slop in diameter.
12/13/2010
byteme97 byteme97
ScottA, I think your best answer in all of this was the "visualize" statement but almost as important was simple statement that not all toys are "round". The wife and I have often gone back to look at "1:1" real views and find that the perpendicular view is far thicker than than the one shown as in an elliptical object.

I'm a technical guy and love to look at things in raw form from a numbers standpoint, but that said there are times when a virtual measure standard come in handy. By that I mean "it's as thick around as a paper towel tube" sometimes tells the story far better than it was 1 3/4" in diameter.
12/13/2010
Intertwining Intertwining
WOAH! Didn't expect this many replies to my post, hahah! Thank you everyone for the help!
12/16/2010
Gunsmoke Gunsmoke
Quote:
Originally posted by Rockin'
I think most of the measurements on EF are rounded to the nearest 1/4" or 1/8", which gives customers an idea of the size without having to read that something is 1.0573 inches wide.

To calculate the diameter of a toy, the ... More
Kris:

You've got your numbers wrong. Pi=3.141 not 3.114. 1/8"=0.125 - so every inch in diameter adds 3" + a little more than 1/8". It's easier to just remember 3.141 or use the Pi function on your calculator.

It also helps to use a string or tape measure because generally speaking toys are not exactly round. By using a tape measure you can account for an oblong shape and textures such as bumps or veining.
12/16/2010
Total posts: 21
Unique posters: 10