Lava Rock Dildo? Would you?

Bignuf Bignuf
A friend just brought back a "hand made, custom sex toy" (Dildo) of, I was amazed, Lava Rock!!! She was on a pacific island. She bought a few "sculptures" from an "artist" who works in that media, and since she was there for a few months (work), she got to be friends with the lady.

I don't know all the events (yet..since she just returned), but this artist mentioned she had a few "very unique" custom things she had done over the years with Lava rocks (usually very, very sharp, rough stuff), and next thing you know, she owns a lava dildo (and some kitchen utensils too, by the way).

It apparently starts with a rock shaped right, then finished to make it shaped even better, then coated, in a many step process, with lacquers and polymer fillers. It ended up looking like a clear plastic dildo with beautiful rock just below the surface (very textured under the smoooooooth surface).

How is that for a "green" and unique use sex toy?
09/03/2013
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Ansley Ansley
"How is that for a "green" and unique use sex toy?"

Not very...I can't think of a single chemical finish that would be body-safe.
09/03/2013
MrWill MrWill
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
"How is that for a "green" and unique use sex toy?"

Not very...I can't think of a single chemical finish that would be body-safe.
Exactly. Not to mention that now this piece of rock will probably never be crumbled back to bits and returned to the cycle.
09/04/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
"How is that for a "green" and unique use sex toy?"

Not very...I can't think of a single chemical finish that would be body-safe.
Oh my...I can tell you that the lacquers she uses are all natural and island plant based. She is into "green" and "sustainable". However the "polymer" she fills the sharp stone with is? Who knows. She has lots of cans from art stores and hardware stores. My friend was describing her shop in detail. Not to worry, however. This young lady bought the "toy" for looks, not use. She has never (not once) used it as a sex toy. She just thought it looked cool.
09/04/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by MrWill
Exactly. Not to mention that now this piece of rock will probably never be crumbled back to bits and returned to the cycle.
Um...no, that it won't. From the looks of it, I suspect it will be encased in that shell for a few million years or so. However, doesn't the same go for our wood sex toys and such. None of these are "natural state" anymore, by a long shot.
09/04/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
Um...no, that it won't. From the looks of it, I suspect it will be encased in that shell for a few million years or so. However, doesn't the same go for our wood sex toys and such. None of these are "natural state" anymore, by a long shot.
I think that's ultimately the point. The only truly green sex toy is one's own genitals and/or their partner's and that's only green if they are living in the wilderness, only consuming what they need, and not using fossil fuels or other known pollutants.

It actually kind of grates on my nerves when people talk about green sex toys. Then again, if you believe the science in a certain documentary, then the Earth and its various animals and vegetation will destroy all surface evidence human beings were ever here within about 100,000 years after our demise.
09/04/2013
Sincerely Yours, N Sincerely Yours, N
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
I think that's ultimately the point. The only truly green sex toy is one's own genitals and/or their partner's and that's only green if they are living in the wilderness, only consuming what they need, and not using fossil fuels or ... More
You have a fair point here. Sadly I like my toys, so I don't mind being a bit less green. : )

I personally believe that eventually we'll kill ourselves off with all of the changes we're making. Nature will survive. It always has. It's crazy when you look around and realize that squid and octopi have been relatively unchanged for hundreds of millions of years while we were unrecognizable just fifty thousand years ago.
09/04/2013
MrWill MrWill
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
Um...no, that it won't. From the looks of it, I suspect it will be encased in that shell for a few million years or so. However, doesn't the same go for our wood sex toys and such. None of these are "natural state" anymore, by a long shot.
Actually, a wooden toy that is "polished" with body safe oils would degrade and return to nature just as a regular piece of wood. You could even venture as far as to make a super thin silicone sleeve to cover the toy during use and display it as an art piece when not being used.

It's only a matter of making sure the wood is sanded and polished enough to make sure there isn't any way to be injured during use, and making sure it is cleaned incredibly well after use.

Wood toys can ultimately be burned (I suppose with high enough temperatures anything could be) to return them back to nature... Some will argue that burning something to complete the cycle isn't green, but I refute that with the fact that fires were burning things back to their essence millenia before humans ever popped up.
09/04/2013
MrWill MrWill
Quote:
Originally posted by Sincerely Yours, N
You have a fair point here. Sadly I like my toys, so I don't mind being a bit less green. : )

I personally believe that eventually we'll kill ourselves off with all of the changes we're making. Nature will survive. It always has. ... More
Except our nuclear reactors will melt down when we aren't here to run them, ruining this planet forever.
09/04/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by MrWill
Except our nuclear reactors will melt down when we aren't here to run them, ruining this planet forever.
Um, not necessarily. Have you seen the after effects of Chernobyl? I mean granted, it's no picnic but some of the rarest species now inhabit the area and are thriving.
09/04/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
Um, not necessarily. Have you seen the after effects of Chernobyl? I mean granted, it's no picnic but some of the rarest species now inhabit the area and are thriving.
You are well read, aren't you? This is a very true observation. I attended a conference on the medical findings, post Chernobyl and the Fukashema reactor leak, just a few weeks ago! Some of the other observations, about animal and plant life, were amazing.
09/04/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
You are well read, aren't you? This is a very true observation. I attended a conference on the medical findings, post Chernobyl and the Fukashema reactor leak, just a few weeks ago! Some of the other observations, about animal and plant life, ... More
Oh, I am so jealous. I would have loved to sit in on that! Chernobyl is, in my opinion, the best example of how nature takes care of itself despite our mishaps.
09/04/2013
HannahPanda HannahPanda
Love the idea, but the execution would terrify me!
09/05/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
Oh, I am so jealous. I would have loved to sit in on that! Chernobyl is, in my opinion, the best example of how nature takes care of itself despite our mishaps.
Believe me, "nature" has still not "healed itself", by a long shot, in places such as this. The levels of hazard to all living organisms is still, in some area's, extreme, and will be for many generations. The mutations which occur in almost all plant and animal life exposed to these radiation effects are still only partially understood...both short and long term.

Below is the information for the conference that was already held, but perhaps you can find another location or time when such a conference will be held again. I know there will be many, many more like it, over the coming years. Same for the Fukashema reactor event.

Symposium: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident l March 11-12, 2013

The New York Academy of Medicine, New York City, NY

A unique, two-day symposium at which an international panel of leading medical and biological scientists, nuclear engineers, and policy experts will make presentations on and discuss the bio-medical and ecological consequences of the Fukushima disaster, will be held at The New York Academy of Medicine on March 11-12, 2013, the second anniversary of the accident. The public is welcome.

A project of The Helen Caldicott Foundation, the symposium is being co-sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility.



Registration forms must be filled out completely and accurately in order to insure easy check-in. The registration process will generate an e-ticket. This ticket MUST be presented at the door. If you lose your ticket you must provide photo ID that matches your registration information.



Symposium: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident


Date: March 11, 2013 to March 12, 2013
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM



Speaker(s):

Chaired by Donald Louria, MD, Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey


Sponsored by: Nuclear-Free Planet


Location: The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029


A unique, two-day symposium at which an international panel of leading medical and biological scientists, nuclear engineers, and policy experts will make presentations on and discuss the bio-medical and ecological consequences of the Fukushima disaster, will be held at The New York Academy of Medicine on March 11-12, 2013, the second anniversary of the accident. The public is welcome.

Chaired by Donald Louria, MD, Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health of the University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey, the symposium is a project of The Helen Caldicott Foundation.


About the Speaker(s)

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr. Tim Mousseau, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina – Chernobyl, Fukushima and Other Hot Places, Biological Consequences

Ken Buesseler, Marine Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute –Consequences for the Ocean of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

David Lochbaum, The Union of Concerned Scientists – Another Unsurprising Surprise

Dr. Wladimir Wertelecki, Former Chair of the Department of Medical Genetics and Birth Defects, University of South Alabama, 1974-2010 – Congenital Malformations in Rivne Polossia associated with the Chernobyl Accident

Dr. Marek Niedziela, Professor of Pediatrics, Poznan (Poland) University of Medical Sciences – Thyroid Pathology in Children with Particular Reference to Chernobyl and Fukushima

Dr. Alexy Yablokov, Russian Academy of Sciences – Lessons from Chernobyl

Akio Matsumura, Founder of Global Forum for Parliamentary Leaders on Global Survival – What did the World Learn from the Fukushima Accident?

Robert Alvarez, Senior Scholar, Institute for Policy Studies, formerly of DoE - Management of Spent Fuel Pools and Radioactive Waste

Arnie Gundersen, Nuclear Engineer, Fairewinds Associates – What Did They Know and When Did They Know It?

Dr. David Brenner, Higgins Professor Radiation Biophysics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University – Mechanistic Models for Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Living Systems

Dr. Steven Wing, Associate Professor Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University North Carolina - Epidemiologic studies of radiation releases from nuclear facilities: Lessons past and present.

Steven Starr, Senior Scientist, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Clinical Laboratory Science Program Director, University of Missouri - The implications of the massive contamination of Japan with radioactive cesium

David Freeman, Engineer and Attorney, Former Chairman of TVA and Science Advisor to President Jimmy Carter –The Rise and Fall of Nuclear Power

Dr. Ian Fairlie, Radiation Biologist and Independent Consultant on Radiation Risks, Former Scientific Secretary to UK Government’s Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters – The Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima: Nuclear Source Terms, Initial Health Effects

Andrew S. Kanter, MD MPH FACMI, Immediate Past-President of Physicians for Social Responsibility – Moderator, Health Effects Panel.

Dr. Hisako Sakiyama, Doctor of Medicine, Former Senior Researcher in National Institute Radiological Sciences, Member of Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigative Commission - Risk Assessment of Low Dose Radiation in Japan; What Became Clear to The National Diet of Japan Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission

Dr. Herbert Abrams, Stanford University, Emeritus Professor Radiology, Stanford University, Member Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee National Academy Sciences (BEIR V11) - "The Hazards of Low-level Ionizing Radiation: Controversy and Evidence."

Kevin Kamps, Specialist in High Level Waste Management and Transportation, Beyond Nuclear – Seventy Years of Radioactive Risks in Japan and America

Dr. Helen Caldicott, Founding President Physicians for Social Responsibility – The Nuclear Age and Future Generations
09/05/2013
stacylyn12 stacylyn12
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
"How is that for a "green" and unique use sex toy?"

Not very...I can't think of a single chemical finish that would be body-safe.
that is very true
09/05/2013
stacylyn12 stacylyn12
Quote:
Originally posted by HannahPanda
Love the idea, but the execution would terrify me!
agree
09/05/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
Believe me, "nature" has still not "healed itself", by a long shot, in places such as this. The levels of hazard to all living organisms is still, in some area's, extreme, and will be for many generations. The mutations which ... More
Thank you so much for posting all of that! I will definitely keep my eye out; I guess it never occurred to me to look into conferences and the like.

There are a number of documented mutations, particularly among the fish populations. I just had a flash of some killer mutant fish jumping out the lake and onto land and devouring the nearest civilization...

I hope that scientists will continue to study the area and all of the wild life within it. It would probably help us understand so much more about nuclear energy.

Still, if all of the humans disappeared tomorrow and the Earth were left to its own devices, within the span of 100,000 years the surface will look as pristine as it did before we industrialized the world. No huge buildings will remain -- they will have all rusted and tumbled to the ground, concrete will be overgrown with grass and vegetation...and there will be some creature thriving in a healthy population somewhere to keep the whole cycle going.
09/06/2013
KyotoAngel KyotoAngel
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
Thank you so much for posting all of that! I will definitely keep my eye out; I guess it never occurred to me to look into conferences and the like.

There are a number of documented mutations, particularly among the fish populations. I just ... More
Mutant fish killing people, you say?

...sorta like this?
x'D
09/06/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
Thank you so much for posting all of that! I will definitely keep my eye out; I guess it never occurred to me to look into conferences and the like.

There are a number of documented mutations, particularly among the fish populations. I just ... More
There is no question that research will continue for many decades, or longer. You should see the precautions and limitations that survey scientists still must go through, both prior to entry and upon exiting the area. The question becomes, what effects are seen in the "native" population of that area in 100 years, 200 years...etc.

As for medical/scientific meetings. My hubby and I go to such things for professional reasons. Many such meetings really are open only to certain professionals "in the fields" involved. However, a number of groups routinely welcome grad students and even have a set aside number of spots open for general public attendance (although lectures can be very "dry" if you don't know the science). This includes all areas of interest you can think of, from space science, genetics, oceanography...etc.
09/08/2013
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by KyotoAngel
Mutant fish killing people, you say?

...sorta like this?
x'D
Perhaps, but isn't that where we got Godzilla?
09/08/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
There is no question that research will continue for many decades, or longer. You should see the precautions and limitations that survey scientists still must go through, both prior to entry and upon exiting the area. The question becomes, what ... More
Right, I know that you can only be in the area for a certain number of days/hours and that your radiation levels are monitored very closely. If you get close to the maximum amount you are immediately required to leave, regardless of what you were doing. This makes it exceptionally difficult to gather evidence and information for any significant period of time.
09/09/2013
Dairygirl8808 Dairygirl8808
Quote:
Originally posted by Bignuf
A friend just brought back a "hand made, custom sex toy" (Dildo) of, I was amazed, Lava Rock!!! She was on a pacific island. She bought a few "sculptures" from an "artist" who works in that media, and since she was there ... More
It sounds extremely abrasive XD omg she's brave
Feb 20, 9:49 pm
Total posts: 22
Unique posters: 8