There's glass and then there's glass

Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
I know we had a post about breaking glass toys recently and it seems most of us haven't had a problem -- but I was reading Sarah Sloane's article this morning and it's got me pondering...

In light of the fact that lower cost glass toys have been known to shatter overnight on the shelves in retail stores due to temperature changes -- seriously! -- and that bumping into other glass or metal toys, etc can cause stress fractures we can't even see and weaken the toy...

I'm starting to think maybe value glass isn't such a value?
Is it worth the risk to have a lower glass toy as opposed to maybe no glass toy if we can't afford the luxury ones?
06/22/2009
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Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
Then again...

DBD was the only one of us who had a glass toy break and hers WAS a higher end one.

Hmmmmm....
06/22/2009
ScottA ScottA
For glass toys I pay strong attention to the material. Borosilicate glass is much more resilient (think laboratory glassware - that's all borosilicate, and can tolerate the bumps, heating, flame polishing & bending etc.) than "ordinary" soda-lime glass. I have had non-borosilicate "Pyrex" (it was brand-name Pyrex, but not borosilicate) shatter, but never borosilicate.
06/22/2009
Sammi Sammi
I haven't had anything shatter yet, but I've been ultra-careful with all of my glass toys.
06/22/2009
Mamastoys Mamastoys
I've not had any problems but I handle mine VERY carefully!! I only have two and I want to keep them around for a long time.
06/22/2009
Red Red
Actually, ScottA makes a very good, important and relevant point. Pyrex toys (borosilicate glass) come with a higher price tag than "Tempered Glass" toys. tempered glass (pyrex is actually tempered borosilicate glass) is less strong than pyrex. I would bet that the toys that have reported to shatter are just tempered glass.

But all that aside, skinny necks on glass toys - particularly plugs - kind of scare me. And a while back I actually decided I wouldn't be requesting any other glass toys - the super careful storage and such really gets under my skin - plus those bulky poufy bags and cases you get with glass toys are so.....bulky!
06/22/2009
Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
According to the article, the difference is less about types of glass (it seems just about everyone is using pyrex/borosilicate) and more about the cooling process.
06/22/2009
Red Red
Quote:
Originally posted by Carrie Ann
According to the article, the difference is less about types of glass (it seems just about everyone is using pyrex/borosilicate) and more about the cooling process.
Oh, there's an ARTICLE....well, who "reads" articles anyways?

Not Red, apparently
06/22/2009
Red Red
Quote:
Originally posted by Carrie Ann
According to the article, the difference is less about types of glass (it seems just about everyone is using pyrex/borosilicate) and more about the cooling process.
and PS - I just reviewed a Tempered Glass toy
06/22/2009
LicentiouslyYours LicentiouslyYours
Quote:
Originally posted by Carrie Ann
I know we had a post about breaking glass toys recently and it seems most of us haven't had a problem -- but I was reading Sarah Sloane's article this morning and it's got me pondering...

In light of the fact that lower cost glass ... More
I've never broken a glass sex toy, but I have broken more than one Pyrex glass dish. In all cases they broke into large pieces, rather than shattering into dangerous shards.

I guess my thought is that glass, regardless of being resistant to breakage, IS glass and should be treated as if it WILL break (i.e. store it safely and avoid dropping or banging it into other glass or metal toys). Hopefully that will reduce the likelihood of breakage.
06/22/2009
Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
Quote:
Originally posted by Red
Oh, there's an ARTICLE....well, who "reads" articles anyways?

Not Red, apparently
lmao
06/22/2009
Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
Quote:
Originally posted by Red
and PS - I just reviewed a Tempered Glass toy
Oooh. What company is using tempered glass?
06/22/2009
Red Red
Quote:
Originally posted by Carrie Ann
Oooh. What company is using tempered glass?
The toy was from WHK GmbH

If you read eden's materials guide for tempered glass, it suggests that it is pyrex. I currently don't believe that is true, as the toy recently reviewed said tempered glass on the package and never said pyrex, and I kind of feel like toy companies are all over declaring words like "Pyrex" when they can.

Anyways, if you look at a lot of the cheaper glass toys, you will notice that their material is listed as tempered glass...

?
06/23/2009
Carrie Ann Carrie Ann
Quote:
Originally posted by Red
The toy was from WHK GmbH

If you read eden's materials guide for tempered glass, it suggests that it is pyrex. I currently don't believe that is true, as the toy recently reviewed said tempered glass on the package and never said ... More
I was just looking around online and it almost seems like tempered glass would be safer. It seems if a small break occurs, it's designed so the whole thing will just sort of crumble into pieces without sharp edges, as opposed to what DBD's toy did.

How odd.

I'm going to have to do more research now.

Glass and bleach. On my list! Lol
06/23/2009
ScottA ScottA
Borosilicate will do the same thing as tempered glass when it breaks, but it's more resistant to shocks and thermal stress.

I've heard reports that Pyrex isn't always borosilicate.
06/24/2009
Not Here Anymore f/k/a Happy Lady Not Here Anymore f/k/a Happy Lady
I bought a glass dildo for $20 in a local store. (to be fair, the actual price was almost 2x that but I get a discount there) I've had it a few weeks and been very careful with it. It came in a plain snap-closed hard plastic casing that I now use for storage. There is nothing on the package to indicate the type of glass.
I have done EXTENSIVE searches online for it, to no avail. It exists on some lower-end retail sites, but all I get there is price and measurements. I've also seen some other bloggers review it on their blogs, but it is a different color and called something different. An email to the manufacturer got no response.

I guess I'm just not clear on what the danger is here. I mean, I understand that "weakened" glass could shatter more easily - but what is the actual risk it's going to break while I'm using it? Especially if I don't subject it to sudden drastic temperature changes.
06/24/2009
Sarah Sloane Sarah Sloane
Quote:
Originally posted by ScottA
Borosilicate will do the same thing as tempered glass when it breaks, but it's more resistant to shocks and thermal stress.

I've heard reports that Pyrex isn't always borosilicate.
Pyrex glass is actually a brand name, and should technically only be used if the manufacturer or artist purchased glass from the company that owns the name Pyrex. It *should* be borosilicate glass, regardless - all pyrex is borosilicate, but not all borosilicate is pyrex!
06/30/2009
Sarah Sloane Sarah Sloane
Quote:
Originally posted by Not Here Anymore f/k/a Happy Lady
I bought a glass dildo for $20 in a local store. (to be fair, the actual price was almost 2x that but I get a discount there) I've had it a few weeks and been very careful with it. It came in a plain snap-closed hard plastic casing that I now use ... More
Shattering is one thing; according to Adam from Xhale glass, who I interviewed for my article, the issue that can cause health issues is from microfractures and scratches in the surface of the glass that can (at best) trap bacteria, and (at worst) cause internal (to the user) scratching & bleeding.

Most glass toys aren't labled, but the info can usually be found out if you call enough people back up the food chain. There are a number of locally-based people who make glass sex toys and sell w/o a lable or brand - some of their items are perfectly safe, some are a bit iffy (I saw one that had a color applied to the outside of the glass - ooh, that'll be nice when it flakes off in my body - ack!).
06/30/2009
Dragon Dragon
Working on another review myself and just found this thread... I've been too busy looking for a job to play on the forum. I found this site that talks about how "pyrex" is not meant to handle sudden temperature changes or cooling. That is how they might break.

"Mine" broke when it went from a suitcase to water in the sink, but I wouldn't say that it was serious temperature change. They are designed to be heated...

and Red, don't feel bad... I don't often read articles either. They require extra time and clickies...

(I was really just checking if I was the ONLY one that had a toy break. Apparently. Really sad now...)
08/05/2009
tim1724 tim1724
Quote:
Originally posted by Sarah Sloane
Pyrex glass is actually a brand name, and should technically only be used if the manufacturer or artist purchased glass from the company that owns the name Pyrex. It *should* be borosilicate glass, regardless - all pyrex is borosilicate, but not all ... More
NOT all Pyrex is borosilicate, at least not anymore in North America. Originally the Pyrex brand name was only used for borosilicate glass, but the current North American manufacturer of Pyrex cookware uses non-borosilicate glass for it's cheaper lines. All of their laboratory glassware is still borosilicate and all Euoropean Pyrex is still borosilicate.

How that affects glass sold to third parties, I have no idea.
08/09/2009
ScottA ScottA
Quote:
Originally posted by Sarah Sloane
Shattering is one thing; according to Adam from Xhale glass, who I interviewed for my article, the issue that can cause health issues is from microfractures and scratches in the surface of the glass that can (at best) trap bacteria, and (at worst) ... More
Many colors are in the form of powdered colored glass. During the manufacture it is melted into the body glass, so it is essentially one piece.
08/09/2009
ScottA ScottA
Quote:
Originally posted by tim1724
NOT all Pyrex is borosilicate, at least not anymore in North America. Originally the Pyrex brand name was only used for borosilicate glass, but the current North American manufacturer of Pyrex cookware uses non-borosilicate glass for it's cheaper ... More
Thought as much - I've had one "Pyrex" measuring cup shatter in use (which borosilicate would not do), so now I'm a bit more careful.
08/09/2009
Sir Sir
Well, it comes down to this question: which glass toy maker makes the safest, greenest, and most worthy products? I'd love to know, because I'd rather spend a couple hundred on something that will last for a very long time, won't harm my little girl, and is beautiful than on something that might possibly break inside of her.
10/03/2009
Adam Burns Adam Burns
Quote:
Originally posted by Sir
Well, it comes down to this question: which glass toy maker makes the safest, greenest, and most worthy products? I'd love to know, because I'd rather spend a couple hundred on something that will last for a very long time, won't harm my ... More
Sir, it's not really about the manufacturer so much as it is about the artist who crafted the piece. I have posted in a previous thread that quality labor costs around $40/hr. Most full sized dildos take on average 45-60 minutes to complete...if not longer. So..having said that--if you see a full sized dildo retailing for under $50 or so, then the person who made it probably didn't have the experience to warrant the $40/hr labor charge. Assuming the retailer is only doubling the cost of the item from wholesale to retail, that would mean that a $50 dildo would cost $25 wholesale. Do the math..it doesn't add up. Another thing to keep in mind is that not all American "brands" manufacture all of their pieces in the US. It can be a bit deceiving especially with companies that have been known to be American brands selling American made products for so many years. I will be the first to admit that even XHale, as a company, has been tempted to import some of our goods, but just couldn't find the quality labor that our image and brand has grown to represent. Maybe this quality labor is out there somewhere, unfortunately we have been unable to find it as of yet....and trust me we have been on the hunt for years. Also, outsourcing goods to a foreign country would make it very difficult to maintain a high level of quality control (at least for us)..although frequent trips to Asia or Mexico would be quite nice!
10/17/2009
Holly Hox Holly Hox
This is all very interesting. I have been toying with the idea of getting a glass toy. But I am a bit afraid of breakage and what not. Would it really be worth the purchase?
01/01/2010
El-Jaro El-Jaro
Quote:
Originally posted by Holly Hox
This is all very interesting. I have been toying with the idea of getting a glass toy. But I am a bit afraid of breakage and what not. Would it really be worth the purchase?
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes

Absolutely!
01/01/2010
Gunsmoke Gunsmoke
Quote:
Originally posted by Holly Hox
This is all very interesting. I have been toying with the idea of getting a glass toy. But I am a bit afraid of breakage and what not. Would it really be worth the purchase?
Hollyhox - Mr. Sauce is absolutely correct - at least 1 or 2 glass toys are a must!

We have at least 6 of them. When I ask my wife what toy she'd prefer, about 80% of the time it's glass. In the summer it's nearly 95% of the time because of the cool feeling on her hot skin. We don't get into putting them in the fridge - think about it - the glass is room temperature and your body is almost 99 degrees - so even at room temperature it feels cool. To make the glass more user friendly in the winter we take the chill off with a heating pad - but be careful not to get it too hot!

Having said all that - if you're still not convinced, you can always go with steel or aluminum toys like nJoy and Alumina. You get the weight & temperature play with no risks. The only down side is glass comes in many more combinations than the metal toys. The subtle textures, ripples and bumps of the glass are important for my wife.

Happy hunting.
01/01/2010
FAM4LIFE FAM4LIFE
wow! Good to know about Pyrex, I always thought it was "better" than regular tempered glass, but not always so!
07/28/2010
Erato Erato
Okay so I too am toying with the idea of glass, and thanks to everyone I feel more prepared to pick and play. Thanks all!!
08/11/2010
ScottA ScottA
Quote:
Originally posted by Erato
Okay so I too am toying with the idea of glass, and thanks to everyone I feel more prepared to pick and play. Thanks all!!
The thing you need to do is be careful in storage and periodically inspect the toy. If it gets scratched then force is concentrated on that line and it will be more likely to snap.

That said, it's unlikely that you'll have a problem unless you're very careless about storage. Glass is tough.
08/12/2010
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