Different types of Glycerin...

  • Get a Free Rabbit Vibe with Orders $59+

Different types of Glycerin...

Darling Dove Darling Dove
Okay, I'm wondering why there is the same taboo against vegetable glycerin as there is against standard sickeningly sweet glycerin? I get infections from the smallest amounts of standard glycerin, but veggie glycerin is fine for me, and usually is tasteless.
I wish that more people would educate themselves on different types of glycerin and that Eden distinguished between the two types. I've seen people dis Probe, for example, for having glycerin and say flat out "I am not putting it in my vagina" when its obvious they have done zero research and don't know or care that its actually a natural, plant derived product in that case.

So... does anyone else actually research what type of glycerin lubes use? Would you even be willing to accept that there are different types and some are okay, or is the massive industry taboo too much?
In general, do you think the sex industry suffers from material/ingredient taboo without reason?

Personally, I have tried the expensive organic lubes, and find them not much different than lubes with veggie glycerin in terms of use- They are alright, but I wouldn't say they are the be-all end-all of lubricants.
08/31/2009
  • Buy 3 Items for $70
  • Buy 3 Items for $50
  • Buy 3 Items for $30
  • Save 20% on Luxury Toys
  • Add Some Buzz To Your Favourite Toy & Save 60% On Kit
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
All promotions
Epiphora Epiphora
I would also like to know if veg glycerin is just as bad as regular glycerin.
08/31/2009
Darling Dove Darling Dove
In my opinion it isn't. As I said I'm sensitive to one but not the other- Veg glycerin is also pretty tasteless. So while I have had an experience that tells me it's alright for me, I suppose it may be different for everyone.
08/31/2009
spicywife spicywife
the lubricant we use has veg glycerin, it's currently the only one that we can use due to our allergies. It doesn't have much in it in terms of ingredients but works well. We mostly use it for hand jobs and to put on toys since I haven't had much trouble with my own vaginal lubrication at this time. And I've never had issues with using the vegetable glycerin.
08/31/2009
Miss Cinnamon Miss Cinnamon
I tried Probe many months ago, when I was still dealing with a recurring yeast infection. I can't say for sure that it was to be faulted for my immediate flare-up not long afterward, but things definitely took a turn for the better after I switched to silicone lubes and glycerin-free water-based lubes. I guess it really does depend on the individual.
08/31/2009
Active Release Active Release
from wikipedia: (Glycerol) Used as a laxative when introduced into the rectum in suppository or small-volume (2to10ml)(enema) form; irritates the anal mucosa and induces a hyperosmotic effect.

In other words, glycerin is an irritant for mucus membranes.

I have to believe that the glycerin in probe is derived from something similar to palm or coconut. This is probably why these are non-irritating.

If you want to choose something less irritating, you could make your own natural lube from boiling down okra or aloe pulp and collecting the slime. That's what I first thought when I tried probe. It does tend to disturb some people, but I'd rather use something natural and plant based than something lab-made.

So, if you can eat coconut, you should be able to use probe.
The lab-made glycerin is usually derived from animal fats, but sometimes vegetable fats are used. It's process uses a chlorine compound which is currently being phased out as too expensive. Let's hope the new process is less toxic.
10/09/2009
Red Red
Quote:
Originally posted by Darling Dove
Okay, I'm wondering why there is the same taboo against vegetable glycerin as there is against standard sickeningly sweet glycerin? I get infections from the smallest amounts of standard glycerin, but veggie glycerin is fine for me, and usually ...
Caffeine from coffee is the same as caffeine made in a lab. One is natural, the other is not, but they are the same.

Glycerin is glycerin is glycerin. It has a chemical structure, and that is that.

Regardless of its source, it is a carbohydrate, and yeast love carbohydrates.
10/09/2009
Tuesday Tuesday
Quote:
Originally posted by Red
Caffeine from coffee is the same as caffeine made in a lab. One is natural, the other is not, but they are the same.

Glycerin is glycerin is glycerin. It has a chemical structure, and that is that.

Regardless of its source, it is a ...
As a former chemist, this is what I was thinking. I'm wondering if the difference is that different and less irritating impurities are in 'vegetable' glycerin.
10/09/2009
Darling Dove Darling Dove
Well I'm not sure what it is then. But I can use Probe with no issue and every other lube I have used that contains glycerin gives me an instant infection.
10/09/2009
Darling Dove Darling Dove
Quote:
Originally posted by Darling Dove
Well I'm not sure what it is then. But I can use Probe with no issue and every other lube I have used that contains glycerin gives me an instant infection.
Oh- as well.. probe is totally tasteless. Other lubes I've seen with glycerin in them taste sickeningly sweet, like simple syrup used for cooking.
10/09/2009
tim1724 tim1724
All glycerin is identical chemically identical. It's C3H5(OH)3. It also goes by the names glycerine, glycerol, and a variety of other names. (I believe the Wikipedia article has a list, if you're interested.)

Glycerin is always sweet tasting. If a particular lube contains glycerin, but doesn't taste sweet, then either it contains only a tiny amount of glycerin, or it contains something else which is covering up the sweetness. (Or the manufacturer is chemically confused and has made a mistake on the ingredients list.)
10/09/2009
Darling Dove Darling Dove
Quote:
Originally posted by tim1724
All glycerin is identical chemically identical. It's C3H5(OH)3. It also goes by the names glycerine, glycerol, and a variety of other names. (I believe the Wikipedia article has a list, if you're interested.)

Glycerin is always ...
Then perhaps it is the amount of glycerin that makes the difference? I doubt Probe would be chemically confused.
10/09/2009
Saraid Saraid
I don't get infections, but glycerin makes me itch badly. I've switched to Sliquid and have not have any problems since.
10/09/2009
Jimbo Jones Jimbo Jones
Quote:
Originally posted by Darling Dove
Well I'm not sure what it is then. But I can use Probe with no issue and every other lube I have used that contains glycerin gives me an instant infection.
Probe does contain Grapefruit Seed Extract which is supposed to have anti-biotic, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties, so maybe that is keeping you from getting a yeast infection?
10/10/2009
jesh jesh
I know this is an old topic but I just wanted to agree with Tuesday, "....if the difference is that different and less irritating impurities are in 'vegetable' glycerin. "

This makes sense and would explain the difference in taste. Impurities in the glycerin could change the chemical shape of it and therefore effect the taste. Sweetness requires a certain shape for the tongue to pick it up. It could also cause the carbohydrate to become less usable by the vagina..
03/04/2010
Total posts: 15
Unique posters: 11