Silicone and Plastic Bags

- Kira - - Kira -
Does anyone store their silicone toys in plastic bags (like a Ziplock freezer bag or something like that)? Are there any potential concerns in doing this? I generally store everything in cloth bags or original packaging, but I've run out of space (again) by keeping things in original packaging plus I have a hard time finding cloth drawstring pouches. Not to mention I have to open all my pouches when I forget which black bag the toy I want is in. I've always avoided plastic bags because I felt like somehow it would mess up the material, but then I thought that the original packaging is plastic so I guess it would be okay. So are plastic bags safe for silicone toys?
12/17/2011
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Starkiller87 Starkiller87
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
Does anyone store their silicone toys in plastic bags (like a Ziplock freezer bag or something like that)? Are there any potential concerns in doing this? I generally store everything in cloth bags or original packaging, but I've run out of ... More
I store my silicone plugs in plastic bags, because I dont like them touching each other and other things.
12/17/2011
indiglo indiglo
I don't let my silicone toys touch the plastic of the plastic bag. I either wrap them in paper towels, a lint free cloth, a sock, etc. I'm not sure that there is reason for concern, I just do it to be preemptive. I look forward to hearing more about this!
12/17/2011
Kindred Kindred
I store almost all of my silicone toys individually in plastic bags and have had no issues. However, I also know people store all of their silicone toys together.
12/17/2011
Kissaki Kissaki
I've used plastic bags for all my silicone toys and have had no issues.
12/17/2011
Misfit Momma Misfit Momma
Have kept some of my silicone in plastic bags for a long time, and have never had a problem.
12/17/2011
Gracie Gracie
I would love more clarity on this. Some reviews say that silicone toys can't touch each other, and others say they can and I've wondered is this the reviewer's opinion or fact and who do I believe? I read somewhere that plastic toys shouldn't mix with silicone toys, but the silicone came packaged in plastic so I'm not really sure what to do. I wish EF carried more storage bag choices. Also an inexpensive satin bag would make a great free gift option!
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
Well, call me reckless, but I keep all my silicone in plastic bags... and often a few toys to a plastic bag. (Plastic ziplock for anal toys, and a couple plastic ziplocks for vaginal.) I'm more careful with my Jollies toys because of their irreplacability, and my dual densities because of their fragility, but I have some silicone (Silk medium and Cone) that have been stored together for upwards of two years without any problem.

I'm on a phone, so forgive me for not linking, but if you check the edenlink q&a we had with Tantus, Metis said after their toys were pulled from the molds but before packaging them, they're all just stored together in a bin.

I am not a materials scientist, so I don't have the correct words, or the actual knowledge to back thos up, but the impression I had gotten was that, after liquid silicone has been resin-ified by exposure to the (platinum in sex toys usually) catalyst, it becomes inert. The problem that silicone toys have with silicone lubes is that (especially the softer the silicone resin is, because the softer it is, the less the molecules are cross-linked) the fluid dimethicone and cyclopentasiloxane (if misspelled, sorry, phone) can begin to cross-link with the free molecule ends. But since two catalyst-cured, resin dildos are not fluid, there's not a lot of molecules to cross-link with, just from a "molecules can't slip around and find compatible sites" perspective.

That's why I'm extra careful with my dual densities and softer silicones, though, because they have dimethicone in their outer resin matrices (at least, Vixen's website says so, I assume it's the same across brands).

But in general? I keep my silicone away from tpr toys that might have plasticizers, because plasticizes can be destructive---but I'm not afraid of keeping silicone together, or in ziplocks. It's been working for me for years .
12/17/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Thanks so much for all the responses!!

I always put not to store silicone next to silicone in my reviews. I've always though that was correct information, but now Antipova has posted a super scientific reason why that might not be the case. So now I don't know if I should put that info in reviews anymore. lol

Antipova - A lot of that was way too scientific and over my head! LOL! I will take from that to keep dual density toys extra safe but that other toys will be okay in plastic bags.

What's a plasticizer? You say you keep your toys away from things that might have them, so now I need to know what they are to keep my toys away from it.
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
Thanks so much for all the responses!!

I always put not to store silicone next to silicone in my reviews. I've always though that was correct information, but now Antipova has posted a super scientific reason why that might not be the ... More
I don't know if it's "super-scientific" at all---that's just how I understand it!

Plasticizers are things like phthalates, it's a broad class of things and I don't know all of their names. But like jelly toys are made of PVC---the same as stiff plumber's pipe---but it's softened with phthalates to get the jelly consistency. Since phthalates make the pvc softer/more plastic, they're a plasticizer.

Apparently some TPR is made of something naturally soft, and then stiffened up with hardeners, abd others are made of something naturally hard, and then softened with plasticizers. Since I don't know which is which, just basically if it's not pure silicone (or glass or metal), I keep it in Ziplock-bag isolation.
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
To add to that, of course, I have no clue what Ziplocks are made of, but in all my life I've never had one bond with anything, from chopped vegetables to dessert bars to Tantus silicone, to even that dumb mystery material attachment for the Fairy Mini. I just keep 'em out of the microwave and they treat me right
12/17/2011
Holly Hox Holly Hox
Thanks for posting this stainedclear! Very informative thread!
12/17/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Gotcha! Good to know.

I have no idea what a Ziplock is made of either. I seriously hope nothing too toxic, as my food goes in there. I'm not sure if I'd be more concerned with things going in my tummy that have had nasty chemicals leaked onto them or things going in my vagina. Either way, not good. If someone knows and it's bad, maybe I don't want to know. LOL I don't want to have to buy $20 bags from Whole Foods. X.x
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
I might have missed the point there... if it smells like a new shower curtain, don't trust it around your toys. That's my rule of thumb.
12/17/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Ha. If it smells like a shower curtain, I generally only trust it to go in the trash.
12/17/2011
Starkiller87 Starkiller87
Silicone is absolutely 100% fine with other silicone. You should see my closet of silicone molds all stacked together. Some are tin based and some are platinum based and even then they are completely fine together. Same rule applies to silicone toys.. I agree with Antipova on the if it smells like a new shower curtain dont trust it.

Basically once Silicone is vulcanized (the process which it solidify from the silicone and catalyst) not much can mess with it as another solid. You can chop a silicone toy up, throw it in another mold with silicone and catalyst and it will adhere itself into one thing, which is kind of cool but off topic.
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
Quote:
Originally posted by Starkiller87
Silicone is absolutely 100% fine with other silicone. You should see my closet of silicone molds all stacked together. Some are tin based and some are platinum based and even then they are completely fine together. Same rule applies to silicone ... More
Thanks Starkiller! "Vulcanized" sounds a lot better than "resin-ified".
12/17/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Quote:
Originally posted by Starkiller87
Silicone is absolutely 100% fine with other silicone. You should see my closet of silicone molds all stacked together. Some are tin based and some are platinum based and even then they are completely fine together. Same rule applies to silicone ... More
So I am officially not adding in not to store silicone next to silicone in my reviews anymore.

Thanks for all the info! Interesting stuff.
12/17/2011
indiglo indiglo
Yeah, the main toys you have to worry about not storing with other toys are composites/compounds and rubbers. Silicone is absolutely safe to store with silicone, for the reasons already mentioned.
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
So here's something I've wondered- is the catalyst a solid chunk, or in powder form? How much contact does the silicone have to be in for the process to work? How easy is it to recover the catalyst?

When you make a mold (or maybe it's a cast? 'Pologies for layman's terminology) and fill it up with yoursilicone, are you filling it with a liquid? I've always assumed so, given the swirly patterns Happy Valley and Tantus have, but you make it sound like the raw material could come as granules too. Details?
12/17/2011
Starkiller87 Starkiller87
Quote:
Originally posted by Antipova
So here's something I've wondered- is the catalyst a solid chunk, or in powder form? How much contact does the silicone have to be in for the process to work? How easy is it to recover the catalyst?

When you make a mold (or maybe ... More
Here is step my step on how it goes from idea to in your hands.

1. Design (pretty obvious)
2. Mock up. While I would go in and make one out of clay some companies do theirs by computers and have them cut out of foam or whatever.
3. Molding your model. I think most toys probably are made with a resin mold or even maybe fiberglass. Its basically making a hard shell on the outside of the model, then cleaning it out hollow, so you can pour up copies.
4. Casting your toy. For silicone you have 2 parts, the silicone which is white and kind of has a thick texture like thick glue. And the Catalyst which is about the constancy of a thin liquid. Catalyst is pretty dangerous stuff so you cant get it on your body or you will become sterile or blind or a 100 other things they warn us about. But you measure out the amount you need depending on what you are running,and you mix them together very very very well, the silicone will turn a color depending on what you are tinting it. Most silicones are blues and stuff pretint. But it stays the constancy of the thick gloopy silicone and you pour it quickly into your mold, usually from really high up standing on a chair or something because you dont want airbubbles and high pours help prevent them. It will take a few hours to set or "vulcanize" so you just let it sit there. Depending on heat and stuff like that in the room it can take longer or there is stuff called quick kick that you can add to your silicone before you pour it that will make it have a quicker set time. After it sets you pop the mold open, clean up seams and its done.

You cant really recover the catalyst in the sense that you liquify it again and reuse it. What I mean by the whole you can take your old silicone and throw it in a mold with new materials is that sometimes after a few 100 runs of something if its a silicone mold it will start to break apart. Or say you have some flawed toys you ran and you dont want to just throw it away. You can cut up the silicone into tiny chunks (the silicone being a solid at this point) and you can add into your poured liquid silicone for a new objects and it will adhere together. So basically it can be used a filler so you wont waste more liquid silicone. Kind of like packing peanuts or something, it takes up space in the box basically.
12/17/2011
Antipova Antipova
Quote:
Originally posted by Starkiller87
Here is step my step on how it goes from idea to in your hands.

1. Design (pretty obvious)
2. Mock up. While I would go in and make one out of clay some companies do theirs by computers and have them cut out of foam or whatever.
3. ... More
Aaaaah, that makes sense. When I would hear about platinum catalysts I had just been assuming they worked on the same principle as a catalytic converter in a car, in which the platinum is not consumed. Different story here, I see, and that helps explain why silicone is more expensive than the less-stable sorts of rubbers!
12/18/2011
Rawhide Rawhide
I wrap my silicone toys individually in bandanas, simply because I've always done it that way. But I am loving all of these silicone science threads!
12/24/2011
JackRaiden JackRaiden
Quote:
Originally posted by Rawhide
I wrap my silicone toys individually in bandanas, simply because I've always done it that way. But I am loving all of these silicone science threads!
That's a really good idea! I assume they are cheaper and less hassle than my cotton drawstring bags, too. Thanks everyone for your thoughts.
12/29/2011
Mr. E Mr. E
I used to store all my toys in zip-loc bags, but that was when our toy collection was small enough to be stored in a small suitcase. Never had any issues doing so. We outgrew the suitcase so I purchased a mechanics tool chest to store our toy collection.

This allowed me to categorize our collection and keep it nicely organized and easily accessible with a dedicated drawer for silicone, another for glass and stainless, another for leather, etc...

Originally I kept the silicone toys all laid out nicely in one of the larger drawers, but as the collection continued to grow, I began storing them loosely in the drawer. Currently our significant collection of Tantus, Vixen, Happy Valley, Fun Factory, etc... are all stored loosely together in two drawers. They are free to do whatever they want when the drawers are closed. They've been stored like this for a couple years with no issues. However, I do store my Vix-skin separately in the original clam-shell packaging.

Any soft toys that I am unsure of are stored in plastic freezer bags in a drawer dedicated to these questionable materials.
01/14/2012
unfulfilled unfulfilled
Thank you everyone for this thread and info. I always thought they couldn't be stored together so I learned a lot today.
01/14/2012
RxL00 RxL00
nope
06/08/2012
Total posts: 27
Unique posters: 14