Mental Disabilities

emiliaa emiliaa
My mental illness is a disability, most definitely. However, mental disability gives the impression that there's a damper on the person's intelligence. I wish that people would be more up front about the type of disability that it is. I have bipolar and panic disorder (phobia-triggered) so I actually have many things I can't do, such as ride rollercosters, attend big parties, anything that has a high risk of motion sickness or seeing someone else get sick...

So it is a disability as it prevents me from doing certain things. But I'm not mentally challenged or anything.
06/09/2011
ashaxmarie ashaxmarie
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
i know people who have mental illnesses and diagnoses and don't consider themselves disabled. i know people who have mental illnesses and diagnoses and do consider themselves disabled. i do have mental health diagnoses and i consider myself disabled (although i have other disabilities, both physical and developmental, which are not related to mental health as well).

there are lots of different kinds of disabilities...mental health, physical, cognitive, intellectual, sensory, developmental...i don't think belonging to a certain category makes someone more or less disabled. and some of us are overachievers and fit in multiple categories, lol.

i believe strongly in self-identification... that is, to me, disability is part of my identity and who i am. instead of assuming whether someone else is disabled, i prefer to ask them if they identify as disabled or not, and go from that
06/10/2011
big b big b
you have love a famly member no matter what
06/11/2011
sweetiebelle sweetiebelle
My last boyfriend has Aspergers. He was a genius, but his social skills were severely lacking. I was his first girlfriend and things ended rocky, he tended to be really clingy and didn't understand why I didn't want to hang out with him every day of the week.

He ended up breaking up with me because I was getting very stressed out (not just because of him, but sometimes he certainly didnt help things) and because I wasn't on his level of intelligence. He got very frustrated with me if the reason I wasn't spending time with him was anything other than school, and I tended to neglect my schoolwork.

I loved him with all my heart and he was a great boyfriend. I wouldn't ever call him mentally handicapped. Mentally ill maybe, but I consider myself mentally ill (I have severe depression and anxiety)

It really depends on the "illness" a person has.
06/13/2011
KnK KnK
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
I'm not voting based upon the responses provided. Mental health is a social stigma. There's a difference between being ill and being disabled.
06/18/2011
KnK KnK
Quote:
Originally posted by Jobthingy
Yeah there is a HUGE difference between mental illness and disability.
Applause, applause. I posted something similar just a moment ago.

I happen to find it offensive to try and group disability and illness together. But I'll bite my tongue and stop my comments here.
06/18/2011
XzombehxbearzX XzombehxbearzX
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
Im on SSI because of mental illnesses. I suffer horribly bad Anxiety and have terrible issues with Bipolar and other stuff. I guess it all depends though.
09/14/2011
Love Bites Love Bites
I guess I don't understand what you are asking. However, I wanted to say that I am clinically depressed and clinically bi-polar, I don't use medicine, and I function fine. I have my ups and downs, but I can go out and behave like "normal", smiling, happy, intelligent and in control of myself. It only becomes a disability when I refuse to do anything to help myself- as in, I sit there, stressing myself out and fretting over every small bad thing that happens without taking a break, or doing anything else. I have healthy relationships with a man, my family, and my friends.
09/16/2011
Vanille Vanille
I am mentally disabled and also mentally ill, I don't believe they are one in the same.
10/08/2011
LQ LQ
Oh dear. Just wandered in here for the first time. I'll try not to rant. My mentally interesting brain has decided to be awake for no reason so... whee!

The way I interpreted the original question was kind of "Are mental illnesses legitimate disabilities, like physical disabilities are, or are they just something people need to get over & shut up about?" It may not have been intended that way, but I've had very similar questions turn into that exact discussion on several occasions. So, I'm just going to answer with that in mind.

I figure a disability is anything that prevents you from taking care of the basic necessities of life, or requires you to have assistance to do so. I mean, the word pretty much defines itself. So, a mental illness could be a disability, but wouldn't necessarily have to be.

If your doctor says you have *insert mental illness* but you feel fine & are able to pay the bills & all, I'm certainly not going to insist you're disabled. (And I'll look at you funny if you tell me you are.)

On the other hand, my situation. I'm unable to work consistently enough to support myself due to Bipolar Disorder. I live on Social Security/SSI at present. That's not a situation I want to remain permanent. I don't just sit around doing nothing. I do as much as I can. I'm working with my doctor on finding better medication. But, yeah, that is a disabling condition for me at the moment. I mostly can't stand PC stuff, but there's the whole person-first language idea where someone is "a person with a disability" rather than just "disabled." I don't necessarily say it that way, because it annoys me, but that's closer to how I think of myself. It's one aspect of me, not the defining aspect.

(Here's an interesting question... There have been times medications were working well for me & I was able to work steadily, etc. Does that make me non-disabled at that time? I still have the same chronic condition which could re-occur... Even with medication that's working, sometimes it just craps out or develops side effects, etc. So, would I be not-currently-but-pote ntially-disabled? Just an odd thought that came to mind...)

I also have Asperger's Syndrome. Technically, it's a developmental/learning disability, I believe. But, I don't really consider it a disability exactly. More just a differently built brain that can occasionally cause difficulty in a world that's built for the average/typical brain. *shrug* Yeah, it probably would have helped me to have some "Special Ed." as a kid because I learn differently & so forth, but as an adult it's mostly just frequent quirkiness & occasional stuff I have to work around. But it's stuff I can work around, so it's not disabling to me.

Of course someone else with the same two conditions could feel totally the opposite. It's a very individual & not-always-logical thing.
10/10/2011
zeb zeb
Sometimes they can be hard to understand
10/12/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Quote:
Originally posted by LQ
Oh dear. Just wandered in here for the first time. I'll try not to rant. My mentally interesting brain has decided to be awake for no reason so... whee!

The way I interpreted the original question was kind of "Are mental illnesses ... More
Agree with this. I also have Bipolar - so I'm sometimes disabled? I'm ill for sure. I've never really used the term disabled but there have been times I could have qualified for disability benefits because I couldn't work or function. If you can't function, well, that's a disability. It's a different type of disability than someone who can't walk because they always can't walk and you can see they can't walk. I can function given the right circumstances and no one can visually see anything wrong with me. I don't think that makes it less of an issue.

As for people who say "shut up and get over it," I think they can stick it where the sun don't shine. No one would choose to go through what I and many others deal with. It's not fun. It just plain blows. There are times I miss weeks of work at the threat of losing my job. There are times my son has to go to my mom's for a few weeks until my meds get right. My husband has almost left me during bad episodes. I have next to no friends because they can't tolerate my swings. Yeah, it's a blast. If I could shut up and get over it, I would have done so years ago.

So my answer is it depends. Someone who is mildly sad isn't disabled. Someone severely depressed that can't do anything likely is. It depends on the circumstances and the specific mental issue and how that person is reacting to it. Some people can function during a deep depression.
10/12/2011
LQ LQ
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
Agree with this. I also have Bipolar - so I'm sometimes disabled? I'm ill for sure. I've never really used the term disabled but there have been times I could have qualified for disability benefits because I couldn't work or ... More
Well put. And *sympathetic hugs*

There are so many times when people just don't get that a mental illness can be just as debilitating as a physical one. It's just a different thing. Really a disorder like Bipolar isn't a heck of a lot different than Epilepsy, it's just a chemical short-circuit instead of an electrical one. One of my meds is even an anti-convulsant. But no one is starting a thread debating the legitimacy of Epileptics.

I have a friend who's always getting ticked off because "I never want to go out." She doesn't get that when I say I'm not feeling well, it's not an excuse or whatever. I'm really not feeling well. I no more feel like hitting the bar than I would if I was puking. It's just not as easy to see, especially since I don't necessarily share the details. Sometimes it almost seems like it would be easier if I turned blue or something during a bad time, so people would get it!
10/12/2011
- Kira - - Kira -
Quote:
Originally posted by LQ
Well put. And *sympathetic hugs*

There are so many times when people just don't get that a mental illness can be just as debilitating as a physical one. It's just a different thing. Really a disorder like Bipolar isn't a heck of a ... More
Some of mine are seizure meds as well. I always use that as an example. "Would you say Epilepsy is an illness one should just get over?" Or "would you ask someone in wheelchair to walk" when being asked to do things that give me panic attacks or otherwise trigger episodes.

My own mom does that sometimes. Drives me nuts. That would be great, to turn blue or break out in a pox or something. Then people would say "jeez go home" instead of "what are you whining about."
10/12/2011
domsub1993 domsub1993
Just like any disability, there are varying degrees of mental illness/disability.
10/12/2011
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
mental illness covers such a HUGE range of things that these questions don't even cover a fraction of them. Some mentally ill patients are indeed partially or fully "disabled", and cannot cope in the real world. Some mentally ill people are the very professionals taking care of you. One of my best doctors is a manic/depressive under treatment and another superb doctor has severe depression when he is not under good treatment. When he is...he is the best there is!!! Neither of those two doctors is what you would call "disabled". Inconvenienced by their disease..sure, but FAR from "disabled".
11/20/2011
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by PussyGalore
I have yet to meet an Asperger's 'patient' who isn't borderline genius and everyone I know with depression is incredibly intelligent, and sensitive.

I so hate it when terms get convoluted and it's becoming increasingly ... More
Bingo. I know a BUNCH of doctors, who are successful, great at their job and also have clear diagnoses of certain "mental disorders". Heck, we probably ALL do. What on earth is NORMAL anyway?????
11/20/2011
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Pleasure Piratess
The terms are not interchangeable, but a person with mental illness may or may not be disabled due to the illness.
Well and clearly said. Thanks
11/20/2011
voenne voenne
Quote:
Originally posted by PussyGalore
Um, when did this happen? The two are completely different, in my book. Mentally disabled means you have lower learning capacity than the average person. Mentally ill encompasses so many different emotional and mood disorders, but most of the people ... More
Yeah, the wording used by the OP is off. But because having mental illness can prevent people from functioning and working, it is considered a disability. But a mental disability something entirely different.

I have anxiety and clinical depression, so for me it's become a disability. But I still try everyday to make things easier so that it won't control my life.
11/28/2011
meezerosity meezerosity
This is a difficult issue for me. I am both physically diabled to a small degree (fibromyalgia) and also mentally (schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety). I do consider myself disabled as I am not always able to get around or function as a "normal" healthy able bodied person would.
01/06/2012
MamaDivine MamaDivine
I think of disabled as being "unable to function in a certain/normal manner". Depending on how they are working with their mental disease or disorder, they can become disabled if its not being treated. however, I hardly see mental illness as a disability on its own.

I have been diagnosed with bi polar, depression and a slew of other illnesses. I also have several family members that have been diagnosed with the same afflictions. I do know that some of my family, if not medicated or being treated are severly disabled. My mother cannot physically function without her medications. My brother becomes very violent and cannot function in day to day life. Myself, I am lucky enough to have a mild form of these disabilities and is mainly controlled with a few medications.

I do find it very offensive though when others consider me "disabled" just because I have problems with some things mentally though.
02/15/2012
wildorchid wildorchid
I have OCD. Personally, I am not disabled. I have strategies to help me cope and deal with my disorder. Nor am I ill or sick in any way. Mental disorders mean that there a differences in my brain that are different from the average person. There is nothing wrong with me, I love who I am. For me, it makes me unique.

Some mental disorders are dibiltating for some people, some cannot cope or do not have the means to. It is important that those of us on the outside respect the fact that every disorder will effect every individual differently. My OCD cannot be compared to anyone else's because it is my brain, my body, my disorder. I am lucky enough to have learned to love my disorder.

Others are not so lucky; all I can do is share my story, offer my help and hope other can be as lucky as I am.
02/15/2012
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
I don't even understand the question. I think the OP's wording touches on more issues than the actual question and the poll options confuse things even more. I thought this question was going to be about people who say "Don't call me disabled, I'm normal even though I'm ill" which is an entirely different conversation it seems.

To me, it's not necessarily an arbitrary distinction between illness and disability because each term describes different types of issues. Mental illness tends to refer to a social or emotional issue that does not affect intelligence but does affect quality of life and how we connect with others even if we remain functional. Mental disability usually means, to me, something that is affecting intelligence or learning in at least some way. The result is disabling when it comes to functioning in society not because of difficulty to do so but because of a permanent inability.
02/15/2012
freda freda
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
i luv them all
02/19/2012
Danneh Danneh
It's extremely insulting to those of us with disabilities- to say that people with mental illnesses aren't disabled because 'they're a genius' or 'they have coping mechanisms'

I am both physically and mentally disabled- declared so by the state. I hold a job, go to college, and I'm a part of Mensa.

Disability does not mean that we can't function in everyday society- it means that there are things that hinder us that don't burden others.
07/06/2012
milfstatus milfstatus
Kind of the same
07/21/2012
JKS JKS
Most of the time when people thing of "mental disability" they are referring to intellectual disability (used to be mental retardation) and IQ. Just because someone has a mental illness does not mean they are disabled. Disabled refers to daily functioning skills.
07/25/2012
Abombadong Abombadong
they're all the same to me
08/13/2012
LunaLuthor LunaLuthor
Quote:
Originally posted by Mistress M.
So, the idea of being "mentally ill" has become mentally disabled. Do you believe that people who are mentally ill are just as disabled as someone with a physical disability?
It depends on the situation
08/16/2012
glasskitten glasskitten
Quote:
Originally posted by Owl Identified
Exactly. A person with schizophrenia may not be capable of certain cognitive processes, of holding down a job, dressing and cleaning themselves, etc. To me, this is a disability. Depression and other mental illness can also be debilitating, although ... More
Yep. This.
09/06/2012
Total posts: 65
Unique posters: 50