What is up with sentences like this?

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What is up with sentences like this?

kendra30752 kendra30752
OK, I know I run the risk of sounding like grandma here, but it's bugged me for so many months that I cannot resist!

Here's an EX of the sentences that have me a little baffled: "When I fell and broke my finger it hurt something fierce"

OR

"When I stapled my fingers together by accident it hurt something terrible."

OK, is it hillbilly talk or what?! Why do people say "something fierce" instead of LIKE something fierce? It totally bugs the hell out of me and I don't know why. Lol. Is it only me or have I am I just totally out of the "loop" with slang these days? I'm only 22!

Does it bug you a little too?
Answers (private voting - your screen name will NOT appear in the results):
I cannot figure out why people use that phrase and it bugs me.
6
I don't mind it, but I don't talk like that.
26
They're mocking hillbillies when they talk like that.
2
I have never heard this before.
4
I have succumbed to the 'somethin' fierce' trend! I just can't help it!
13
Other.
6
It totally confuses me.
5
It really bugs me to hear that.
3
Total votes: 65 (54 voters)
Poll is closed
03/06/2012
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Coralbell Coralbell
I've never actually heard someone say that in real life.
03/06/2012
plaidvulva plaidvulva
I'm pretty sure it's essentially slang grammar.
03/06/2012
Rin (aka Nire) Rin (aka Nire)
I use sentences like this occasionally, though I couldn't tell you where it started or anything like that. I'm pretty sure it's older than "hillbilly talk," though.
03/06/2012
tA tA
This is one of the phrases that I say on a semi-frequent basis.
03/06/2012
- Kira - - Kira -
I hear that all the time in my area. It drives me crazy. I also majored in English so I'm easily bothered by slang.
03/06/2012
ViVix ViVix
Quote:
Originally posted by kendra30752
OK, I know I run the risk of sounding like grandma here, but it's bugged me for so many months that I cannot resist!

Here's an EX of the sentences that have me a little baffled: "When I fell and broke my finger it hurt something ...
My grandma talks like that, so if anything it's not new slang.
03/06/2012
Allstars316 Allstars316
I guess I'm missing out. Never heard of them before!
03/06/2012
Ciao. Ciao.
I've definitely heard a handful of people talk like that, but don't personally use those kinds of phrases.
03/06/2012
Ryuson Ryuson
Sometimes I'll say something like that, but I just picked it up as vernacular from my peers. I have no idea where it came from!
03/06/2012
CafeSabroso CafeSabroso
How about using an adverb instead...
03/06/2012
underHim underHim
I do this but now maybe I will do it less!
03/06/2012
Ansley Ansley
It's colloquial and I say it and I won't be changing how I say it. I adore slang and I use it as often as I possibly can in informal settings. When it comes to work and other professional settings, I use it far less than I normally would.
03/06/2012
Lady Bear Lady Bear
haha thats funny.
03/06/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
I don't know anyone who speaks like this. However, I do live in the North. I rarely hear "fixin' to" or "I reckon" either. I think these are just regional anomalies.

Where I live, in Chicago, people say things like, "Ya know, over by dere, by Joey's." (meaning "You know, near (or at) Joey's place.") Or, "Is that kid nursing, yet?" ("Yet" meaning "Still.") Or the ever popular Chicago, "Hey, youse kids, come over by here!" "Youse" being the plural of "You." One of the big grocery stores in our area is Jewel. Yet, locals always call it, "Da Jewels." "Where did youse get dat cake?" "Over by dere, ya know, by da Jewels." With the "S" being pronounced in the soft ssss form, not the zzzz form.

I try to sound educated most of the time, but when I get excited or angry, the "Chicago" comes out of me, albeit, I never use the word "Youse."

I think, at least in Chicago and parts of southern Wisconsin, this dialect was the result of the gigantic numbers of Polish, Irish and Italian immigrants coming to the area in the late 1800s and their languages and accents merging. Chicago has more people of Polish ancestry than anywhere in the world outside of Warsaw. We also have large populations of Italians and Irish, and most of our ancestors came over during the Ellis Island Years. It effected the accent of the people in the entire area. At least that's my theory.
03/06/2012
corsetsaurus rex corsetsaurus rex
I think my Dad is the only place I've heard "something fierce" actually used, which is even more confusing because he's the opposite of a hill-billy. Weird.
03/06/2012
CindyH CindyH
don't talk like that
03/06/2012
Wide Awake Daydream Wide Awake Daydream
I live in the deep south, so I've heard it, but not a lot. 'I reckon','ya'll', and smashing words together like "Ja awnt tooo"="Did you want to" is more common. We also don't push buttons, we mash them. And there is the ever popular "cutting on the light". If grammar is your thing, you might want to take a Xanax before you head down south
03/06/2012
Owl Identified Owl Identified
It's super old, definitely not a new trend. It's just a rural kind of thing, I guess it's southern? It doesn't bother me, but it sounds odd to me as it's not often said here.
03/07/2012
SilverMinxxx SilverMinxxx
I grew up listening to people talk like that. For example, "It hurt something awful." So I'm afraid that I do use wording like that sometimes.
03/07/2012
mistressg mistressg
I say "it...something fierce". lol I'm in my 20s and I grew up in a city. It's not a phrase I use all the time, but I know I do rarely.
03/07/2012
TheSinDoll TheSinDoll
I'm 33. I live in Alabama. I can think of terms that we use down here that are far more extraordinary than "something fierce".

I don't think it's an age thing as much as it's a cultural and educational thing. If people don't move away from where they grow up, then they will never learn how to speak any different than those who came before them.

Going off to college and having the opportunity to expand your mind are great opportunities, but unfortunately, in the Bible Belt, things are a bit different.
03/07/2012
Owl Identified Owl Identified
Quote:
Originally posted by TheSinDoll
I'm 33. I live in Alabama. I can think of terms that we use down here that are far more extraordinary than "something fierce".

I don't think it's an age thing as much as it's a cultural and educational thing. If ...
I should clarify that when I said in my comment that "it's super old," I meant that the rhetorical quirk itself is old. It didn't mean only old people said it! And I would like to see this list of extraordinary southern sayings! It seems lately we're getting some lessons on southern speech and etiquette. It's a learning experience for me because I've been about as south as New Jersey in my life, lol.
03/07/2012
aliceinthehole aliceinthehole
Quote:
Originally posted by kendra30752
OK, I know I run the risk of sounding like grandma here, but it's bugged me for so many months that I cannot resist!

Here's an EX of the sentences that have me a little baffled: "When I fell and broke my finger it hurt something ...
it's a southern thing.

we say that around here too. usually just a little for kicks and giggles, but not for real hard giggles... because in kentucky, we all have at LEAST a little hick in us. ain't nothin' wrong wit it neither nohow.
03/07/2012
Errant Venture Errant Venture
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
I don't know anyone who speaks like this. However, I do live in the North. I rarely hear "fixin' to" or "I reckon" either. I think these are just regional anomalies.

Where I live, in Chicago, people say things ...
You're probably right in that it's a Polish/Irish/Italian thing, but as I read your post I was reminded of the East Sussex dialect (note, while there is a county called East Sussex, the dialect isn't named for the county. The break up of Sussex county into two parts, west and east, is relatively new, but the differences in the Sussex dialect can be found going back centuries, separating into three parts: West, Middle, and East). In the East Sussex dialect (not slang, it's actually classed as a dialect), they replace 'th' with 'd'.

Also, I am half English and half Scottish. I can speak Scots Gaelic, and the plural for you is 'thusa', pronounced 'hoosa', and the West Sussex dialect (I live in this area) bears a striking resemblance to - what I gather is - Southern US slang. I need to find one of my Sussex dialect dictionaries to provide examples.
03/07/2012
Owl Identified Owl Identified
Quote:
Originally posted by Errant Venture
You're probably right in that it's a Polish/Irish/Italian thing, but as I read your post I was reminded of the East Sussex dialect (note, while there is a county called East Sussex, the dialect isn't named for the county. The break up of ...
I read this like, three times. It was an amazing bit of linguistic theorizing. Thusa are keeping me rapt today with this back and forth!
03/07/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Wide Awake Daydream
I live in the deep south, so I've heard it, but not a lot. 'I reckon','ya'll', and smashing words together like "Ja awnt tooo"="Did you want to" is more common. We also don't push buttons, we mash them. ...
Bwahaha! We took a trip to Graceland and parts of the South a few years ago. I couldn't understand most of the people in the small towns. When I worked a lactation hot line, it was for the entire country, and sometimes Southern ladies would yell at me and say, "Honey, y'all gotta slow dowwwon. I cain't undertand y'alls Yankee accent." Yeah, I talk funny.
03/07/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Errant Venture
You're probably right in that it's a Polish/Irish/Italian thing, but as I read your post I was reminded of the East Sussex dialect (note, while there is a county called East Sussex, the dialect isn't named for the county. The break up of ...
Wow. That's fascinating. Yeah, there are a lot of Irish (which, whether we admit it or not are mixed with English and Scottish a lot of the time) in the Chicago make up (me being part of that, as well as Italian, and my husband being a blend of Polish and Bohemian ancestries.) I had no idea about "Thussa." It's..... "youse!"
03/07/2012
TheSinDoll TheSinDoll
Quote:
Originally posted by Owl Identified
I should clarify that when I said in my comment that "it's super old," I meant that the rhetorical quirk itself is old. It didn't mean only old people said it! And I would like to see this list of extraordinary southern sayings! It ...
You're just going to have to come visit me and I'm going to make you some biscuits and gravy.
03/07/2012
LavenderSkies LavenderSkies
Quote:
Originally posted by Coralbell
I've never actually heard someone say that in real life.
Same.
03/31/2012
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Total posts: 34
Unique posters: 29