Can you get addicted to anti-depressants?

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Can you get addicted to anti-depressants?

Xavier7 Xavier7
I've been taking a generic of Cymbalta for about a month now, and a couple weeks ago when I ran out of it and needed more-I hadn't taken it for a day- a family member said that I seemed really angry and frustrated out of nowhere. Now that I'm on it again I feel great. I'm sure it was withdrawal, and I know I really look forward to taking my dosage every day. Could I be addicted, or does my body just know I need it?
Answers (public voting - your screen name will appear in the results):
You could be addicted.
LicentiouslyYours , potstickers , Gunsmoke , joja , moonch1ld , SomewhatSomewhere , dv8 , DreamWolf , Lover of Leather
9  (36%)
No, your body just needs it.
DeliciousSurprise , Xavier7 , Rin (aka Nire)
3  (12%)
Gotta say other.
firekitten , PassionQT , Emily! , El-Jaro , Jobthingy , Anne Ardeur , Darling Jen , ~LaUr3n~ , Chilipepper , B8trDude , darthkitt3n , NawlinsDawlin , Danielle1220
13  (52%)
Total votes: 25
Poll is closed
01/03/2011
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PassionQT PassionQT
I've never been on anti-depressants long enough to find out if they are addicting. Even when they were prescribed, I always felt better NOT taking them, but I realize that some people do need them. I just deal with the ups and downs in my own ways now, without the cotton mouth!
01/03/2011
firekitten firekitten
In my personal experience with antidepressants that isn't how it works. It takes a couple of weeks for it to build up in your system so you feel an affect. Once that has happened, skipping one dose won't alter your that drastically. It isn't recommended to miss doses, or quit cold turkey however. Unless you're on something like Valium I don't think they are supposed to be very addictive.
01/03/2011
DeliciousSurprise DeliciousSurprise
Physical, emotional and psychological reaction all can occur when suddenly stopping (or even titraing down from) a psychiatric medication; physical responses to stopping a medication is not the same as addiction, these responses can be prevented by properly stopping your medication.

Reactionary symptoms can occur as soon as one missed dose, with some medications.

As for whether or not you are addicted... Well, we can't know that from what you've posted here. Do you think that you're unable to get through the day without it? If you had to stop taking it permanently, what kind of a reaction would that prompt?
01/03/2011
Emily! Emily!
Okidoke soo...

I'm on Zoloft. I need it. It's not necessarily because I'm an unhappy person... It's because of a chemical inbalance that makes me not myself. I was on it when I was younger (14-16 I think) and I'm now on it again. I started taking it last Juneish I think and it started working almost immediately within a few days (although it is said to only take effect after a couple of weeks, everyone is different).

I'm on 100mg a day at the moment and I take my pills before bed because they tend to make me nauseous any other time. If I miss a night... I can REALLY tell the next day. So can my boyfriend and my mom. I get cranky, very emotional, and I cry over EVERYTHING! So I definitely think you could be like me in that aspect.

Another thing is... You should never ever run out. I always go get a refill when I'm down to one weeks worth left. With antidepressants, you should never ever stop cold turkey. It can really fuck with your system and emotions. It really does take a doctore to slowly lower your dose and closely monitor your reactions and behaviour.

Anywho.. with all that said... If you ever have any questions or concerns you can PM me. I'm more than willing to help if I can. I've been on a few different types and experienced a few different side effects and whatnot.

But, I would always recommend talking to your doctor regarless.

Hope this helped
01/03/2011
Illusional Illusional
Quote:
Originally posted by Xavier7
I've been taking a generic of Cymbalta for about a month now, and a couple weeks ago when I ran out of it and needed more-I hadn't taken it for a day- a family member said that I seemed really angry and frustrated out of nowhere. Now that ...
It might be both.

When I was in high school, I was on two really heavy anti-depressants.
I decided to stop taking them without asking my doctor or anything, just out of the blue.

I started vomitting in gym class and I kept shaking, like I was really cold. I was having a really hard time breathing and I kept screaming and crying and in between.
01/03/2011
Owl Identified Owl Identified
Yes, SSRIs create a physical dependence in your body. As Illusional described above, stopping these drugs cold turkey is dangerous and can result in serious withdrawal in the short time and severely erratic mood cycling in the longer term.
01/03/2011
El-Jaro El-Jaro
I had a friend who was on Cymbalta and it was the worst thing in the world when she came off it. Something they don't tell you about anti-d's: They not 100% how they work for every person; that's why there's a laundry list of side effects possible.

Without going to medical school or a pharmacy college, I'd think your body was just negatively reacting to coming off it; I don't think it's a matter of addiction in the usual sense of the word.
01/03/2011
LicentiouslyYours LicentiouslyYours
Quote:
Originally posted by Xavier7
I've been taking a generic of Cymbalta for about a month now, and a couple weeks ago when I ran out of it and needed more-I hadn't taken it for a day- a family member said that I seemed really angry and frustrated out of nowhere. Now that ...
Many drugs, anti-depressants included, can inspire a physical dependence when taking them for extended periods. This is why many drugs come with the warning not to stop taking the drug without instruction from the doctor.

My mother visited me once, forgetting her Paxil prescription when she came. She suffered from dizziness and nausea through out her weekend visit. These are symptoms of withdrawl. Once she resumed the drug and came with a gradual reduction plan with her doctor, she suffered none of these symptoms.

It doesn't sound like a matter of psychological dependence, so it shouldn't be a cause for great concern as long as you take it as directed by your doctor.
01/03/2011
Jobthingy Jobthingy
I take Effexor and I know that if I forget to take a pill at night (I take it at bedtime), I will know it by about 5pm the next day. I get nauseous and I get dizzy and the room spins. It has an awful withdrawal feeling. I have been wanting to talk to my doctor about getting off it and I am pretty sure I will have to take time off work to do so because of that god awful feeling.
01/03/2011
Anne Ardeur Anne Ardeur
As others have already said, your body begins to depend on any drug you take regularly - the sudden lack of that drug can cause physical symptoms, but IMO it's different from addiction.
01/04/2011
Darling Jen Darling Jen
Wow, everyone pretty much covered all of what I was gonna say. Just make sure you talk to your doctor about side effects and withdrawal symptoms. And never cold turkey stop a drug regimen like that because (as others have said) it can really do some crazy, and sometimes fatal, things to your body. Take care of yourself!
01/04/2011
Gunsmoke Gunsmoke
I voted 'yes' but it's probably more dependence than addiction - but to me that's a distinction without a difference! If you have a problem - you have a problem - although treatments do vary by diagnosis.
01/04/2011
~LaUr3n~ ~LaUr3n~
Most SSRI are specifically engineered to be non-dependant. But some of them dab into the controversial category possibility. For example...Prozac. But if you are taking something like Zoloft...no. But like anything, you can become "addicted" mentally instead of physically.
01/04/2011
Chilipepper Chilipepper
Having studied addiction psychology, I can't see how this would be classified as an 'addiction' simply because Xavier doesn't try to rebel like everyone else does. As I am a sufferer of dysthymia (life-long depression) and having been on anti-depressants off and on throughout the years, I can also agree that I look forward to my daily doses simply because I know it's keeping me out of that dark pit. I hated my depression worse than being chained to a pill bottle; no one understands the hell of depression without being there themselves.

Always amazes me when 'normal' people make judgments against those who need anti-depressants to keep ourselves 'sane'. We are not getting high, nor are we experiencing any reality-altering states. We are functioning NORMALLY like NORMAL PEOPLE for the first time and it's a relief to not have to fight the darkness all the time. I've always likened my depression to 'drowning' - the feeling that my nostrils are just level with the surface of the water and I'm trying to keep myself from sinking all the time. At least on anti-depressants the feeling is that my head is above water and I can see what's around me now.

As for the 'missed days' reaction - manifestation of fearing the loss of 'sanity'. When we're scared, we lash out. I've seen it and discussion reveals that's why the reaction happens. We're scared of going back down into the dark pit again.
01/04/2011
joja joja
Not all antidepressants are alike. Cymbalta is the brand name of an SNRI called duloxetine, which does cause some withdrawal symptoms, most commonly dizziness, irritability/anxiety, and headache. So, you clearly have some physical dependence on it, but it's not likely to be called addiction unless there's a psychological aspect to it.

Source: I'm a licensed pharmacy technician
01/04/2011
Xavier7 Xavier7
Quote:
Originally posted by DeliciousSurprise
Physical, emotional and psychological reaction all can occur when suddenly stopping (or even titraing down from) a psychiatric medication; physical responses to stopping a medication is not the same as addiction, these responses can be prevented by ...
That's what I thought, mainly.

I know I didn't really post enough about my personal dosage and whether or not I could be addicted-I guess the main question was whether or not anyone could be. But I understand that different drugs do different things.

Yesterday I forgot to take my pill and I was fine but once a while ago I forgot and I was pretty angry that day for no reason...as I said before. I don't know if I could stop taking it permanently. I feel like I really need it, but I could be wrong.
01/04/2011
Xavier7 Xavier7
Quote:
Originally posted by El-Jaro
I had a friend who was on Cymbalta and it was the worst thing in the world when she came off it. Something they don't tell you about anti-d's: They not 100% how they work for every person; that's why there's a laundry list of side ...
That's probably more of the case. I appreciate what you said.
01/04/2011
ScottA ScottA
There are different types of "addicted". Over time if you need an antidepressant or whatever your body does get used to having the chemical in you and there are reactions if it is stopped. They are not addictive in the sense of narcotics or even some of the ADD stimulants. If you don't need the drug you're not going to have the sense of "addiction". If they were addictive they would be controlled substances, along with Ritalin, OxyContin and morphine.
01/04/2011
B8trDude B8trDude
While anti-depressants aren't "addicting", there can be very significant and serious side effects and problems with withdrawal. Never stop taking them suddenly and you should really consult a doctor and look at other web sites devoted to the topic. Especially look for sites where patients report their own experiences as the literature provided by the drug manufacturers is often inadequate.
01/09/2011
ScottA ScottA
Quote:
Originally posted by B8trDude
While anti-depressants aren't "addicting", there can be very significant and serious side effects and problems with withdrawal. Never stop taking them suddenly and you should really consult a doctor and look at other web sites devoted ...
Drug literature is not really "inadequate", it's just intended for an audience of doctors, nurses and pharmacists, and so they leave out a lot that they expect medical professionals to know.

Granted it generally doesn't help the person taking the drugs much.
01/10/2011
SomewhatSomewhere SomewhatSomewhere
Anything that has medication in it can cause an addiction. However, it generally takes skipping it a few times in a row before you get withdraws. Once you start taking them again after just missing it one day, it's like the placebo affect: you simply feel better, even if it's just a few minutes later.
01/10/2011
Liz2 Liz2
Quote:
Originally posted by ~LaUr3n~
Most SSRI are specifically engineered to be non-dependant. But some of them dab into the controversial category possibility. For example...Prozac. But if you are taking something like Zoloft...no. But like anything, you can become ...
I am in total agreement here! Mental addiction can be so strong.
01/10/2011
NawlinsDawlin NawlinsDawlin
They can be addicting if you take them for a long time. Your body though becomes used to you being on the meds and your body sees that as normal so when you take them away your body kinda goes haywire.
01/11/2011
DreamWolf DreamWolf
I don't want to offend and scare you, and I know how it is like to be so extremely depressed that on your own it would be hard to feel ok in daily life...

But I do say that yes, your body has got used to it, and though it very much depends on what stuff you take (to tell the truth I have no idea what that thing you are taking is, and am not into "modern medicine" at all as I don't trust it at all, there are about 3 pill brands I would ever take unless am dying, and those are only to treat high fever and very nasty flue), but most of such things are made of things what are very bad for your body and highly addictive, not to mention that the American curing practices are not curing practices at all, just a "Pill Nation"... (If I may dare to assume you live in the States, scuse me if not... But all the stuff said in this comment stands for many other countries too with the western modeled "culture" so much shaped like American "culture", by the media dominant worldwide...) They feed you with shit for your money, and of course that shit will cause you even more shit, so they can take even more money of yours...

If you listen to me then you will try to stop using it (no matter what the doctor says, you have just read that they don't give a fuck to cure you a wee bit - respect to the very few exceptions who really try to do it and not just shove poison down your throat), and read about how one can manage to handle it, as it is decided inside the mind, and not by forcing it with fuckin pills...

Yeah, it's addictive, but do you wanna be an opiate addict? Then I bet you don't wanna be an anti-depressant addict too... Not better stuff, believe me, you still need the load to feel ok, just like with opiates...

Dare to ask me about anything btw, I will be more than glad to help you, and believe me, it is not that hard to see the sunshiny side of life, no matter how deep you are in your worries and sorrows... Depression is just a state of mind, and one can live a balanced life no matter what the circumstances are... It is decided all in your mind to change it, and it's better to turn to folks who are provenly helpful in it (like people who don't try to make you swallow shit), and it doesn't particularly have to be a psychologist or anyone you pay money to, because believe it or not there are a LOT of wise people out there who will do their best to be on your side without asking for anything in return!

I wish you the best luck, stop taking that shit as much as you can, and really, dare to message me anytime... ~smiles soft and winx to cheer him up
02/04/2012
DreamWolf DreamWolf
Quote:
Originally posted by DreamWolf
I don't want to offend and scare you, and I know how it is like to be so extremely depressed that on your own it would be hard to feel ok in daily life...

But I do say that yes, your body has got used to it, and though it very much depends ...
Oh and one more thing... Don't just rush to stop it without doing some deeper research about it, but doing it slow is a very good way to manage it... There are several herbs too to help you, I could already list a few used as anti-depressants... But I just say don't try to rely on them, just go slow and easy, and determined to stop, very determined to get rid of that shit... ~smiles warm
02/04/2012
Ms. Spice Ms. Spice
Quote:
Originally posted by DreamWolf
Oh and one more thing... Don't just rush to stop it without doing some deeper research about it, but doing it slow is a very good way to manage it... There are several herbs too to help you, I could already list a few used as anti-depressants... ...
I think it's fair to assume two things based on your post: you've never suffered from depression at any point in your life and you're not a professional doctor by any means. If you have suffered from depression, you would know that you would take ANYTHING to make yourself feel functional and normal. Luckily there are pills created by medical professionals that do just that. It makes life easier for those that are suffering from an otherwise debilitating disease.

And please, please don't parallel anti depressants to opiates. Opiates are used to treat those who suffer from serious physical pains, and without them, again, a lot of people wouldn't be able to function or participate in daily life. When abused, they can cause a real addiction. Anti depressants don't perform either of these functions. Don't compare apples to oranges when they have little to nothing in common. It completely invalidates your argument.

Listen, I understand that you don't believe in a traditional form of living, and that's fine and everything when it comes to yourself, but don't offer advice that could possibly harm someone else when you don't have adequate information yourself.

Western medicine has drastically improved the standard of living over the last one hundred years. People are living longer and more fulfilling lives.

OP, you are not addicted to your drugs. Your body has created a physical dependency and if you're interested in not using them, you need to talk to your Dr. first to see if he/she thinks if it's a good idea first, and then you two need to sit down and create a plan to wean you off. Do NOT do it by yourself! You don't know exactly how much you need to take when, so don't guess it! Your Dr. has gone through 8+ years of med school, so they'll be able to help you every step of the way.

Good luck!
02/04/2012
Total posts: 27
Unique posters: 23