ADHD and other disorders

Cherrylane Cherrylane 12/03/2011

In a class I'm taking on deviant behavior, the current section is focusing on the so-called "medicalization" of deviant behavior. The curriculum in general is calling into question the legitimacy of mood and other cognitive disorders whose symptoms are primarily behavior based, such as ADHD and bi-polar disorder. An oversimplified take on it is basically "psychology and psychiatry is wrong."

As of this very moment, I am supposed to be writing a short essay on why ADHD isn't real and why drugs shouldn't be taken for it and why the drugs used to "treat" it shouldn't be considered "medication." I, personally, am having a very hard time with it because I was, in fact, diagnosed as having ADHD coupled with slow processing speed as a teen and attribute that diagnosis, the subsequent treatment, and status as a person with disabilities (academically) to much of why I am able to be successful as a young adult, academically and otherwise. I truly believe my brain functions differently, and that it puts me at a dramatic disservice when I am not unmedicated. And frankly, the way the curriculum and assignment has been presented makes me feel very insecure about being honest about my experience and analysis of the subject with my professor. I fear that if I disagree, I will receive a poor grade and be told that I have not "grasped" the concept or w/e.

Sooo basically I was wondering what the good people of EF think about my situation and the subject in general. All polls are private but I'd love an explanation of views and discussion about it.

Invited: All users.

Discussion Topics

1.
2.
3.
Cherrylane Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is one way society regulates behavior it considers undesirable. Thus, because the schizophrenic sees thing the rest of society cannot, we say they are wrong and ill and want them to take medicine so they act how we want them too. Similarly, ADHD is the result of the medicalization of behaviors that are functionally undesirable, particularly with children and teens whose primary "indicator" is simply not performing desirably in school.

Do you agree with this assessment, or do you think that there is such a thing as mental illness and disorder?

I personally believe that although there are instances where this analysis may be true, that there still IS such a thing as mental illness and disorder, that it is possible for the brain to malfunction and that it is right to consider it a legitimately medical issue.
Answers (private voting - your screen name will NOT appear in the results):
119  (81%)
28  (19%)
Total votes: 147
Poll is open
12/03/2011
  • Weekly Special: Hot Vibes! Buy 1 Vibrator And Get 1 FREE
  • Better Price Sale - Save 50%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 70%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 60%
  • Better Price - Save 40%
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
All promotions
Peggi Peggi
Personally, I think that anyone who says things like ADHD or bipolar disorder are crazy themselves! Looking at sections of the brain in those with mental disorders you see similarities between those with the disorder that those without do not have!

Besides, I have plenty of experience both personally and professionally with mental disorders ranging from ADD to schizophrenia to psychopaths. I believe that some people FAKE mental illness, but I believe that they are real! Often, I also believe they are misdiagnosed!
12/03/2011
SilverIsis SilverIsis
First, Schizophrenia has been found to have clear medical basis, and many of the other disorders have been linked to chemical imbalances in the brain, so I really don't understand the basis of the argument in its most broad terms.


Second, anyone who has spent extended time with someone with a severe mental illness would realize that it is not simply a set of behaviors not excepted by mainstream society. There is certainly an element in manipulative behavior in the higher functioning disorders such as ADHD and Bipolar, but that is as much an element of the illness as it is an element of the person's personality.
12/03/2011
HomuHomu HomuHomu
So many people have ADD and ADHD it's ridiculous. I definitely think treating it with medicine like vyvanse is acceptable, but only in adults. I've seen soo many people become messed up adults because they were heavily medicated for disorders as a child. :|
12/03/2011
GravyCakes GravyCakes
i'm ADHD & have been on medication for yrs, & i see a HUGE difference when i am & am not on it. i have a much easier time focusing & getting stuff done after taking my meds. i had a friend in high school who believed that ADD meds were placebos. i would occasionally forget to take my meds (bout once or twice a month), & would be sitting in class fidgeting around & could not for the life of me figure out why i was having such a hard time focusing & getting my work done that day. it wouldn't be until hrs later, after going over in my head what i had done that morning, that i would realized that i had forgotten to take my meds that morning. the fact that i though i was on my meds when i actually wasn't & noticed that i was having a hard time focusing proved that it's not.
12/03/2011
Ryuson Ryuson
I believe that they are real, but often are misdiagnosed. I know of several people that get their young boys taken in to be put on Adderol because at 9 they'd rather be outside running around and have trouble focusing on algebra. I wouldn't be in school to become a psychiatrist if I didn't believe in it!
12/04/2011
Cherry21 Cherry21
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
Ad/Hd and Add is real. My brother was diagnosed with ADHD with anger and major depression. He was on medication that would make him a kid again, one that wasn't so frustrated because his own thoughts were running from him. He liked taking his meds, and when he got to be about 14, he asked if he coudl take less. so we let him, with his doctor's notice of course. Then he slowly backed off of them all together, and can now manage himslef without meds. But without the meds, he would have never known that there was a him that could slow down and be happy with himself. Its real, but i do think that some parents just get their kid diagnosed to get the meds for themselves, or so that their kid "is easier to deal with".
12/04/2011
wrmbreze wrmbreze
I believe mental illness is real. That being said I think there are many kids who get sent to be diagnosed when they are just being kids and some teachers don't want to deal with them.
12/04/2011
CoffeeCup CoffeeCup
I have fairly severe ADD and the idea that it "isn't real" makes me want to scream.

I have inattentive type ADD, which means I am not hyper active. Since I was quite and just day dreamed a lot, I was just told I was lazy through out all of school and didn't get diagnosed until I was 20.

As a kid, I didn't realize my brain wasn't working like other peoples'. I didn't understand why I couldn't pay attention, I cried over my homework at night just to be told I "wasn't applying" myself. And I always knew that was code for I wasn't trying. After awhile, I just figured I didn't know how to try. And how useless do you have to be not to even know how to try?!

So that's what I thought about myself. I was useless.

I tried medication and it was THE BEST THING THAT EVER HAPPENED TO ME!

The way my brain worked CHANGED! I remember thinking "Ooooh! THIS is how everyone else does it!"

I finally could apply the study skills I'd learned!
12/04/2011
js250 js250
There are serious over diagnosis with all diseases. That being said, I was mildly brain damaged in an accident a couple of years ago and notice a huge difference in my concentration levels. I have been diagnosed after several tests to have ADHD but have so far refused medication. I honestly believe my life would be easier with it but am not accepting the damage is permanent yet.
12/04/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by CoffeeCup
I have fairly severe ADD and the idea that it "isn't real" makes me want to scream.

I have inattentive type ADD, which means I am not hyper active. Since I was quite and just day dreamed a lot, I was just told I was lazy through ... More
This was me as well. Medication changed my life. Everyone can tell when I don't take it. I don't process things, even when I try REALLY hard. My doctor told me to never drive without my medication because she felt it was a legitimate safety risk.

Without medication, I was essentially flunking out of school. I'm truly not functional despite extreme effort and intention. On medication, I'm a straight A student with a resume fit for some of the best graduate schools in the country. I feel proud of what I've been able to achieve academically with my medication. When people... and now, particularly my very own professors... call into question the legitimacy and reality of my experience, I feel like they're also delegitimizing the work I've done. That it somehow means I'm unworthy of where I am.

There's so much talk in my field about how labeling someone as disordered or ill is allegedly more damaging than whatever it is you're labeling them for. That it damages their sense of self and whatever. What damages my sense of self is being told that ADHD isn't real, that there is no legitimate treatment for it, that it is merely a matter of behavior and free will. That feels like a condemnation that I deserve to have flunked out of both middle and high school. That what I've achieved isn't really me and isn't something I've actually earned. And they argue that sort of thing in such a way that seems to presume my life would be better if I had flunked out. I feel like I had to work so hard to get to where I am, to prove to people that I was capable and worthy. I enjoyed the work I've done, and I felt like I was genuinely good at it. I now feel uncomfortable telling professors that I'm legally entitled to extra time on tests because I fear they will make assumptions about what sort of person and student I am and the value of the work I do. It feels really difficult and overwhelming.
12/04/2011
eeep eeep
I think that some mental illnesses are truly illnesses, while others are society labeling certain behaviors as 'not appropriate' for how they want things to work. There is mental illness (as in something is wrong with you as a human), and there are mental difficulties. Within this there is a lot of gray area though.
Just because something is not an illness, does not mean the person might not need therapy (either talk, behavioral, or medication), to function properly in the way structured society forces people to function. The other issue is that many times problems are due to hormonal or other imbalances at that point in the persons' life, or from situational aspects of their life that will change.

ADHD is a good example of something that to me, is both a true illness and not. It truly depends on the symptoms, your age, how it affects your life, and how much it is causing you to struggle to function in your daily life.

Many people diagnosed with ADHD (NOT all) only have issues because they cannot function the way society expects them to. By this I mean that they do not have a lot of problems making friends, having relationships, learning, understanding things, taking care of themselves or others, or any of the things vital to survival and being human. They are not ill, they just process things differently. They do have problems doing things that bore them, are routine behaviors, or seem trivial. School is mostly routine boring homework and lectures that only forces them to repeatedly do something they already know - so they get distracted, fidget, daydream, and can't sit still. They need sensory stimulation, and doing routine tasks alone does not provide it.

Further, age and development play a big role as well...
Many children 'grow out of' ADHD once they enter their teens - mid 20s, because their brain chemicals balance out and many of their symptoms will go away as a result. Estimates on how many grow out of it is anywhere from 80-50%. Part of this is because schools push an ADHD diagnosis and drugs for children, and parents listen.
Most of the time when it is diagnosed mid-late 20s and on, it is truly ADHD, often being a younger age for women.
I think it becomes an issue that might need medication when it makes important aspects of life impossible to function in, especially when it comes to school and jobs. If a kid has trouble learning due to ADHD symptoms, medication might be the only option that will work (behavior therapy should be tried first). If a kid just has trouble paying attention and sitting still, but gets solid grades and learns well, I don't think medication should be given. It may make the teacher's life a little more difficult, but the child has no problems with the important part of school, which is learning.
12/04/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by eeep
I think that some mental illnesses are truly illnesses, while others are society labeling certain behaviors as 'not appropriate' for how they want things to work. There is mental illness (as in something is wrong with you as a human), and ... More
Thank you for your input, it was very well formed.

Although I do mostly agree with everything you've said, the trouble with what I have to write in the essay also regards several other "disorders" and is presented in such a way that truly disregards whatever research has been done on the matter as psychological pseudo-science and a mere matter of free will. It truly has me baffled.

There has been no mention of the actual nature of each disorder, which is very misleading. All talk of schizophrenia, for example, has focused on the behaviors associated with it and how there is essentially no way to tell the difference between someone who chooses to perform those behaviors and someone who has no choice, and then proceeds to discount the possibility that anyone has no choice. There is no discussion of the various mechanisms of the brain, of neurotransmitters and receptors, the findings of any neurological study completed within the past 15 years. No mention of the findings and potential of brain imaging software. All of that is entirely ignored, and instead replaced by a few readings from individuals who make blanket claims such as "There is no scientific evidence that such and such exists." It comes off as though the professor is expecting us to just go "if you say so!" and it really just feels wrong...
12/04/2011
eeep eeep
I have had professors similar to that in classes before too. It is always the war between not wanting to piss them off so they don't give you a crappy grade, and trying to stay true to what you know and believe.
Talking to your professor about your concerns may be a good idea, but I would be careful in how you approach it. Bring up ways in which you agree, as well as ways you disagree. That way you are less likely to cause an argument or lecture from them, and will get them to understand you are paying attention.
How I have written papers like this in the past, is by focusing as much as possible on things that you do agree with (or that you agree with parts of), and trying to avoid the parts you think are completely unfounded as much as possible. With psychological stuff, talking about misdiagnosis and whether it has to do with functioning how society expects, versus lacking some human attribute helps. Also, citing that so and so says this and that, as opposed to you feeling that what they say is correct is another way around blatantly disagreeing in the paper.
12/04/2011
Chirple Chirple
Wow, what a shitty assignment. I hope they're doing it so you can learn to play "Devil's Advocate", but I doubt it.

Honestly, people that say ADD / ADHD and bi-polar and such "aren't real" haven't done enough research and are using faulty, likely emotional arguments.

The idea that something can be diagnosed improperly or for the wrong reasons is a different situation and can certainly happen.

Now - the idea that neurodiversity is good and that some (or all) should not be treated is different and much more interesting and complicated than denying reality and human diversity.
12/04/2011
Clandestine Clandestine
First of all, that assignment is completely biased and, if I might say so, rather bigoted... In my mind, at least. As for the rest of my post, it's my opinion and I hope I do not offend anybody somehow.

I work as a registered nurse in a psychiatric facility, and having worked with the clientele, I can say that I definitely believe in mental illness. There is physiological evidence for many mental illnesses, as well as the more overt emotional/behavioural/ functional symptoms.

On the other hand, I feel a bit iffy when it comes to personality disorders. I don't deny their existence, but I'm not sure if we deal with them in the correct way; just labeling a personality as "disordered" seems wrong somehow... Aspects of a person's behaviour, yes, but not their personality itself.

I digress... Moving back to the question at hand... I believe ADD/ADHD are existing conditions. I have a friend who had to drop all of her courses this semester (with academic prejudice, to boot) because she changed doctors and her new physician doesn't believe in ADD and wouldn't prescribe medications for her. It was very challenging for her and now she has had setbacks in her life because of it.

While I don't always like medication being the first line of treatment for most mental illnesses, they do have their uses when prescribed judiciously.

Erm, where was I? Right, right. The assignment. I actually have no clue what I would do in that situation, especially if I had a history of ADD or ADHD myself. I wouldn't want to upset my professor, but I wouldn't want to go against my own values and experiences. Perhaps I would write a paper showing both sides of the argument with research to back up each side. Objectivity and all that good stuff that they love (though your instructor seems pretty biased).

Sorry for such a long post. I had a lot to say and I'm not terribly concise this morning.
12/04/2011
mandaj mandaj
they're real. I had a friend tht had bipolar along with other stuff. and sometimes i would think she would just make things up. but when she find the right meds, she seemed like a total differet person. she got her life back. and it was nice to see her function better in the world instead of being alone in her room. and my oldest nephew was said he had ADHD tht child could never just walk or sit still. and in school he could never stay in his seat and never could really work on his homework. for a very long time my brother did not want him on meds. didnt want him to be dependent on them. but now ethey got him some kind of meds and it has helped him so much in school. he was falling behind, he can read now b4 the meds he couldnt focus on anything. u should write what u feel. as long as u show ur point and give good info. good luck to u
12/04/2011
Ivy Wilde Ivy Wilde
I suffer severely from anxiety/depression and an unusual sleep disorder. I truly believe that these issues are real and are caused by some sort of short circuit or neurochemical mix up in my brain. However, I also believe that there are a lot of people out there who have what I would consider "behavioral" problems that are diagnosed as having psychological problems and/or who excuse their behavior by claiming psychological problems. There is not always a clear distinction between who is really ill and who is simply badly behaved.

As for what you should write on your paper. That's up to you. I had a teacher who was a strict behaviorist, and I wrote and turned in a paper with more of a cognitivist slant and got the lowest grade I've ever gotten on a paper. After talking with the teacher, I truly believe she gave me the low grade, not because I did a poor job researching and writing the paper, but because she disagreed with what I said.

So... how badly do you want a good grade? And how much are you willing to risk by standing up for what you believe? Only you can answer that.

Though you might consider talking to the teacher and asking for clarification as to what exactly she wants you to write.
12/05/2011
Beck Beck
I have to say that some of the mental stuff is real, but not all of them. I think there is a lot of over diagnosing going on with things like depression, ADHD, ADD, and many other mental health issues. Not everyone needs a pill because they are sad, but some do. Not every child who can not pay attention needs a pill either and so on. Kids are meant to have energy and not want to listen.
12/05/2011
squire squire
I agree with much of what Clandestine said. I, too, work in the mental health field and I fully believe that the assignment is slanted, that these mental health conditions exist, but also that many aren't handled properly.

Part of my issue is that many people aren't given enough training to seperate one Dx from another, one needing a particular medication vs another. Specifically relating to things like ADHD, many many children who are given the Dx of ADHD aren't really suffering from that as a primary diagnosis but rather have histories of trauma. WIth children, especially, they are over diagnosed with ADHD, medicated, when in fact there are all sorts of other issues at play that assessors aren't trained to look for. Furthermore, our system is very much based in a cook-book medical model where 1) here are the symptoms and 2)here is what you do....

I could go on, but I think I am rambling. Go with what you believe in, construct a strong argument based on empirical research that is peer reviewed, and keep an opened mind and you'll do just fine.
12/05/2011
Kdlips Kdlips
it's real
12/05/2011
GenderSexplorations GenderSexplorations
As a sufferer of bipolar disorder, I can safely say mental disorders are real. I believe that sometimes ADHD and things are overdiagnosed, but it is out there. And fairly common.
12/05/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
SO, the prof already graded the paper. They gave me a 70, which just happens to be perfectly low enough to prevent me from getting an A in the class.

She took the whole 30 points off for allegedly not defining something I not only defined, but spent two paragraphs on.

If I wasn't furious before, I kind of am now. -_-
12/05/2011
voenne voenne
Mental illnesses are real, I've suffered through depression and anxiety since I was 14. It's only gotten worse now because I myself have trouble understanding and believing it completely, and keep thinking I can just snap out of it. But you can't snap out of it. Whether or not it is situational or chemical, the problem is real.
12/05/2011
null null
I believe that mental illnesses are real, but often over-diagnosed.
For example, both my brother and I were diagnosed with ADHD at a young age. He was put on medication, I was not. I had difficulty in school then realized it was important and decided to try harder. I ended up doing very well in high school and continue to, without meds. He had and still has trouble in school, while on meds, and all of his troubles are blamed on meds/ADHD.

On the other hand, my mother has bipolar disorder, and she desperately needs her meds, eg cannot function without them.
12/05/2011
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
Okay we used to think all these people medicating their kids for ADD and ADHD did not know how to parent and these kids were being drugged for nothing. Till we had a child with ADHD. She was bright and could NOT succeed without medication. She was always singled out as the "trouble child". Pure misery for us and her. She FOUGHT US about taking medicine too! "I don't need it...I'm not crazy".

Finally, HER concept of what the medicine did for her clicked in junior high. SHE begged to get the right medicine and have it adjusted correctly.

I don't want to give too much information, as her career is a sensitive one, and I need to keep HER identity confidential, but I will say she has been on medication for years now, and SHE can tell you all about how they work and WHY they work. As an HONORS SCHOLAR in NEUROANATOMY, and BIOCHEMISTRY, she will be the first to tell you that without the meds, she would be "a bright failure".

Furthermore, as someone who is now BEYOND college, and going to be a doctor soon...and with hopes of being a surgeon (and we have ZERO doubt she will attain that status...with HONORS every step of the way), SHE will tell you that to DENY children medication for ADD or ADHD is no different then denying them medication for Asthma, or Diabetes. She feels strongly, and has said to others that "it is cruel, it is wrong and it is down right abusive" in her opinion to deny a child the treatment that can help them succeed, regardless of the illness or debilitation involved. I second her motion on this now!!!

Sure, there MAY be some over diagnosis of children and YES, as in all human endeavors, some may be misdiagnosed, but to those children who DO have some issues (seems that many factors may be at play, from too much TV to high sugar and hormones in foods...etc), the fact that they CAN be treated and it DOES help is beyond question in too many cases like hers and others WE personally know of. When HER doctor informed her (only after he knew SHE was studying to be a doctor) that HE was on ADD medication since high school, that iced the cake.
12/05/2011
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
SO, the prof already graded the paper. They gave me a 70, which just happens to be perfectly low enough to prevent me from getting an A in the class.

She took the whole 30 points off for allegedly not defining something I not only defined, ... More
TAKE IT TO THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE along with a FIST FULL of VALID and HIGH LEVEL research papers supporting your position on this. FIGHT IT by INFORMATION and FACTS. I have done that, my wife has done that and our daughter has done that with papers. She had a "C" minus, given her on a paper once, turned into an A+ by the DEAN of the department, and the PROFESSOR given a reprimand, for grading a paper with "extreme, unwarranted bias" (a different subject then yours, but non the less, same situation. She basically wrote a GRAD LEVEL paper, with FULL researched and cited documentation to support her rational and blow that professors crappy grade out of the water. YOU CAN TOO!!!!!
12/05/2011
B8trDude B8trDude
Any one in the field of medicine or education who believes that ADHD isn't real is either clueless or lives in a fantasy world. The research overwhelmingly confirms that it exists and that there specific portions of the brain are involved. Here's a link that should help you get started - link
12/05/2011
eeep eeep
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
SO, the prof already graded the paper. They gave me a 70, which just happens to be perfectly low enough to prevent me from getting an A in the class.

She took the whole 30 points off for allegedly not defining something I not only defined, ... More
I would talk to the professor about it during their office hours and if she is unable to explain legitimate reasons for a lower grade, then I would talk to the Dean of the department or someone else higher up. 30 points off for supposedly not defining one thing is unreasonable, especially if spelling, grammar, formatting, length, etc. are all properly adhered to.

As it stands, a lot of their arguments about the issue that you have described so far are not only going against good research, but also going against sound reasoning. I sounds as though she is pointing to society for everything and discounting physiological explanations altogether. At the same time, by focusing on social influences on the person is discounting the person's influence on society. In reality the whole thing is a give and take between physiology and psychological factors, and social factors (going back and forth between the individual and society).
12/06/2011
kadytheredpanda kadytheredpanda
What kind of teacher insists that mental illness is not real? That teacher is bonkers him/herself.

They're definitely real, just over-diagnosed sometimes. There are completely normal kids diagnosed with ADD just because they were given a little too much sugar. I don't doubt that at all. For others, however, it's real. My dad has ADD and holy shit he's always getting distracted. He's definitely better with his medication, though he rarely gets on it. But those rare moments he's on it contrast enough for my family to know that it makes a difference in his behavior. Same with my twin brother.

I'm medically diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and Asperger's. My therapist has told me that it's definitely something biological if I'm having trouble sleeping, concentrating, etc. Depression is not teenage wangst; it's something very difficult to treat even with therapy and medication. There is a history of depression in my family. When someone tells me that I'm just pretending or just need to snap out of my depression, I get EXTREMELY OFFENDED.
12/06/2011
Tangerine Tangerine
I thought ADD and ADHD was a made up disorder. An excuse rather...for why someone just couldnt pull it together and focus on task at hand and take life at a steady pace. I now date someone with ADHD and see it up close and personal and the struggles it presents to the relationship. My friend's husband has it as well and is in treatment for it. He seems to be improving. My partner is not being treated and simply has to be aware of her actions and try 20 times harder than the average person. Before my friends husband was treated the destructive behaviors they displayed (destructive on the relationship) were very similar.
I myself am Bi-Polar (formerly known as manic depression)so I am no stranger to destructive behavior. I am untreated as well. Being untreated is dangerous, but being treated is robotic....
12/06/2011
sweetiejo sweetiejo
I think that ADHD is a real disorder behind the anatomy of it. I'm currently in college and we discussed the actual effects on the body caused by ADHD, one of the problems with it is that it causes chemical imbalances with certain things such as caffine and sugar which also add to the inability to pay attention, and the amount of energy the child or person has. Things that would normally not do much of anything to an "average person could make someone who has ADHD actually have a reverse reaction and become quite hyper with it.
12/09/2011
Badass Badass
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
mental illness for sure is real..
02/01/2012
Djiffy Djiffy
I absolutely believe mental disabilities are real and worthy of attention. As someone who's been diagnosed with something that severely affects my daily life, I think it's foolish to deny that disorders affecting the mind are real.
02/27/2012
jmex83 jmex83
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
I do believe its real. My wife is Bi polar. And trust me, ITS REAL!
02/27/2012
AJvil AJvil
It's real
02/28/2012
SilverMinxxx SilverMinxxx
I think most of them are real. Some, I think are self-fulfilling.
02/28/2012
GONE! GONE!
I think most of them are real, but some of them are blown way out of proportion and overdiagnosed.
02/28/2012
Destri Destri
Of course mental illness is real! I was married to a bi-polar and have a son who is bi-polar, and you will never convince me that this is not a real illness! When my ex took his meds, his behavior improved greatly. My son is an adult and will not take them, and his mood swings are real.

Are people mis-diagnosed and is there some over-diagnosing of this? Sure, probably, but that certainly doesn't make it 'not real.'
03/01/2012
DreamWolf DreamWolf
Well, in this unbelievably fucked up western material "scientific" fake Judeo-Xtian patriarchal society the vast majority of people don't have a bit of idea what mental illnesses are!

Indeed, chemical reactions in the body and brain are included in all of them, but not all the "different" people have real, SERIOUS disorders!

In ancient cultures for example the "crazy" people were considered to be possible shamans, the mediums between the seen and the unseen world, with the lifelong "mission" to help their people...

All in all, modern "science" still doesn't entirely recognize that there are other levels of reality (though of course there are many things already "discovered" and admitted by it too, just most of the people don't know about them, because some are just not available for everybody, others are, just you need to look them up and do some research about them - like that saying: "There is Godly truth and there is worldly truth, and one doesn't exclude the other!" - don't even ask if it sounds exactly like that, I have been spending min. an hour with trying to find who said it, I somewhat recall it was in the era of French Enlightenment, it was Descartes I think, but am not sure... ~growls), and people who have weird experiences (like hallucinations for example) are just called idiots, mentally ill... (I wonder how many of them would be forced to take drugs what ruin and/or kill you anyway if all of those people were under such a control...!)

Of course it doesn't mean that it can only be good if you experience weird things, but not every case means that you are totally twisted out and you need a "treatment"...

Ok, I could ramble on and on, just dropped this humble personal opinion of mine in... ~lays ears blushy
03/01/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
SO, the prof already graded the paper. They gave me a 70, which just happens to be perfectly low enough to prevent me from getting an A in the class.

She took the whole 30 points off for allegedly not defining something I not only defined, ... More
I just saw this post. I am so angry that you had one of these "write what I tell you to write" professors! What a jerk she is.

I had a prof in college who took a Sylvia Plath poem (this was a 70 year old white man) and TOLD us what he thought the poem was about. Well, being a 21 year old woman, I had a pretty good idea what Plath was talking about, so I wrote my paper on what the poem said to me (having also been in the same situation Plath was in in the poem.) He gave me an F (my only F in college) and told me "This is nonsense." When I went to ask him what he wanted he said, "I told you young people what this poem meant." I asked if he wanted our opinion, or he wanted us to regurgitate what he TOLD us to say. He again said, "You interpret the poem." I said I had done that. He insisted that HIS interpretation was correct.

I basically told him he had no ability to teach Plath, didn't understand what she was about and promptly dropped the class. It was the only class I dropped in college, but I refused to regurgitate bullshit from an ancient professor who wouldn't know how to interpret someone like Plath for anything.

Sorry for the rant, but your professor sounds similar. They are there not only to teach, but to help us learn for ourselves. A professor who expects every student to interpret subjective things in the same way they do has no right to lead a college course, as far as I'm concerned.

I hope you got to do a professor evaluation.

I'm sorry you got stuck with such a sucky person who was supposed to be teaching you something.
03/01/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by DreamWolf
Well, in this unbelievably fucked up western material "scientific" fake Judeo-Xtian patriarchal society the vast majority of people don't have a bit of idea what mental illnesses are!

Indeed, chemical reactions in the body and ... More
To play Devil's Advocate, in order to be healthy one can certainly be an individual. But, to thrive in life, one must adapt, be able to learn new things, fit into situations where work, play and learning are not impeded and be able to be fairly happy and productive while doing this. When this doesn't happen (someone cannot eat, sleep, work, play, produce and function or make a living because of their "uniqueness") it is a problem and science has given the name "syndrome" or "illness" to these situations.

Being a unique person is one thing, but one needs to function as well. If functioning is impaired, then it's obvious there is a problem. Most doctors don't go around "looking" for people to "diagnose" simply because they are unique. Most diagnoses happen because the person is unhappy, unable to thrive and cannot adapt.
03/01/2012
curious kitten curious kitten
ADHD is real, and so is many, many, other mental diagnosis. And the only way to deal with them and to improve ones life and health is to face them head on WITH A PROFESSIONAL IN THEIR PARTICULAR FIELD OF THE DISORDER.
03/01/2012
D'Amore D'Amore
I think over-medication happens, but some people do have the illness
03/15/2012
tiggle biddies tiggle biddies
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
i have adhd and i was put on a mild dose of medication for it, and it has helped me concentrate through the years. im grateful that there is treatment available for me, because i dont know how id survive college without it
03/16/2012
carenautilus carenautilus
While I agree that doctors often over-medicate (although usually with stuff like antibiotics), I definitely think meds are the right choice for a ton of people! There have been parts of my life where I couldn't have coped without them. And, jesus, your class sounds truly awful.
06/28/2012
lulz lulz
ADD and ADHD are survival instincts and naturally selected for traits. When your ancestors were running away from Saber-tooth tigers, it would be pretty stupid of them to focus on gathering food and not noticing the bushes rustling. If you don't have ADD then there is something wrong with you.
06/28/2012
Miss Nessa Miss Nessa
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
One of the ideas presented in the curriculum is that "mental illness" is not "real." According to most of the writings, labeling someone as "mentally ill" or certain behavioral patterns as "mentally ill" is ... More
Mental illness and disorder is real! I suffer from a few myself, so I don't doubt they are real.
06/28/2012
lecanis lecanis
What really breaks my brain - no pun intended - about mental illness being dismissed as not real is that a lot of mental illnesses have been shown to cause changes in brain matter as they progress. It's kind of confusing how these things could still be dismissed with that kind of evidence.

Are there people diagnosed with mental illnesses who don't have them? Sure. Medical misdiagnosis of all kinds exists. There are a lot of situations in which doctors have to look at sets of systems and try to sift through huge lists of things that could cause those systems to even decide what to test for, let alone actually decide what is causing the problem. In terms of mental illness, it can be even more complicated, because a lot of what you have to work with is self-reported.

That being said, to say that mental illnesses don't exist because occasionally there's a fad-illness that everyone wants to say they or their child has is kind of ridiculous. There are always going to be hypochondriacs, but that doesn't mean that no one really has cancer, either.
06/28/2012
asphyxia asphyxia
I know your class has long since ended, but I would love to know if you took BigNuf's excellent advice and spoke to the dean of the college about that BS? I hope you didn't have to stick with that biased grade.

I know first-hand that ADD/ADHD is real. I've been suffering from it my entire life, and I was finally diagnosed and I was prescribed medication. I can honestly say that without meds, I would NOT be able to survive my last year of undergrad classes. My life has completely changed since I started the meds. They do indeed work, when they're prescribed to people that NEED them.

I don't know what I would do if I was in your situation. I too have accommodations and I would feel very uncomfortable about presenting them to a professor as biased and frankly WRONG as that one.

No matter what, I can see that you're articulate and intelligent, and you're going to be fine, in spite of that shitty professor.
06/28/2012
Terri69 Terri69
I think for the most part they are real
07/22/2012
xOhxSoxScandalousx xOhxSoxScandalousx
Quote:
Originally posted by Ryuson
I believe that they are real, but often are misdiagnosed. I know of several people that get their young boys taken in to be put on Adderol because at 9 they'd rather be outside running around and have trouble focusing on algebra. I wouldn't ... More
Agreed!
07/22/2012
gsfanatic gsfanatic
I'd agree that mostly they are real, but sometimes they can be overused. The other problem is that things come in spectrums, since OCD can be anything from putting money in your wallet in a particular way to having to have everything be perfectly straight
07/23/2012
michael scofield michael scofield
i have been diagnosed with several mental illness its real i would say now but before i denied it
07/23/2012
Total posts: 54
Unique posters: 47
Cherrylane Cherrylane
In relation to ADHD specifically, the curriculum was extremely adamant that there is no evidence that anything is happening differently in the brain and that in most cases, the so-called disorder is just individual behavior patterns that are chosen upon. Ie, you can't concentrate because you're bored, more interested in something else, etc, not because the wiring in your brain is funny.

Again, I personally, tow a sort of middle line. First and foremost, I do think ADHD is real and has a physiological basis. That said, I also think ADHD is wildly over diagnosed and that not nearly enough consideration goes into its treatment. For example, I have a good friend who has always had a great attention span and was valedictorian out of high school all that. Now in college and pursuing a medical related degree (heavy in the sciences), she has self diagnosed herself as ADHD because she's having a harder time concentrating and learning the material. Then she went home, spoke to a general practitioner about it once, and immediately obtained a prescription for adderall, no additional testing etc. Love her to death, but to me that's kind of bullshit.

Do you think ADHD is real? Do you think like me, that it's real but that many people who take medicine for it don't actually have it, or do you think it's not real at all?
Answers (private voting - your screen name will NOT appear in the results):
16  (20%)
63  (77%)
2  (2%)
1  (1%)
Total votes: 82
Poll is open
12/03/2011
  • Weekly Special: Hot Vibes! Buy 1 Vibrator And Get 1 FREE
  • Better Price Sale - Save 50%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 70%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 60%
  • Better Price - Save 40%
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
All promotions
GravyCakes GravyCakes
i have ADHD & have been on meds for yrs. i do believe, though, that it can be misdiagnosed.
12/03/2011
eeep eeep
ADHD is real, but often misdiagnosed.
12/04/2011
AmberM AmberM
Quote:
Originally posted by eeep
ADHD is real, but often misdiagnosed.
^Yep.
12/05/2011
Ansley Ansley
I'm sure it is real. But, not every child who acts out or is hyperactive has it and I believe it's highly misdiagnosed and overly diagnosed on the whole. Same thing goes for depression---yes, it's real. Again, misdiagnosed and overly diagnosed.

A lot of people have situational depression that is easily managed and "cured" by changing their lives and their daily habits. Clinical depression is fewer and far between, but debilitating nonetheless. Doctors don't have the time, nor the patience, to figure out which is which on a definitive level in most cases and just prescripe the med that was recently dropped off by the pharm. rep. When it doesn't get better, they add another drug or change the levels of the current drug...it doesn't solve the problem, just provides a mask to make it "livable".

I'm still waiting for someone to tell me why it is that humans aren't supposed to have emotions or feelings, and that we're all supposed to be walking around like the sun crawled up our butt and is trying to come out of our mouth. It doesn't make any sense to me...
12/05/2011
P'Gell P'Gell
ADHD is real. My oldest daughter and my husband have it. We waited a long time before medicating our daughter and I feel we damaged her by waiting. She was ostracized by people, due to her odd behavior, her grades suffered and we stuck to our "Oh, we don't want to give drugs to a child." While we were being so cool about it and not medicating, our daughter was suffering.

When we finally did have her medicated the results were phenomenal! She did so much better, responded better and even her grades got better, not to mention her ability to relate to others. She could concentrate, calm down and do what she needed to do while using the meds. She could not do these things, due to brain issues, without the meds.

I need to ask a question; WHY do you have to write an essay espousing an opinion you don't agree with? I would refuse to do it and talk to the professor about. Obviously, he's a pretentious "everything can be solved with love and talk therapy" type and you should be forced to write an essay that you know is untrue.
12/05/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
I'm sure it is real. But, not every child who acts out or is hyperactive has it and I believe it's highly misdiagnosed and overly diagnosed on the whole. Same thing goes for depression---yes, it's real. Again, misdiagnosed and overly ... More
I think if you have a psychologist that's told you that are acted that way, you should probably find a different one.

The not having a whole range of human emotions and walk around with sun up your butt thing lol
12/05/2011
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by Ansley
I'm sure it is real. But, not every child who acts out or is hyperactive has it and I believe it's highly misdiagnosed and overly diagnosed on the whole. Same thing goes for depression---yes, it's real. Again, misdiagnosed and overly ... More
ADHD is not "acting out." My daughter couldn't concentrate! I remember her being about 9 and crying and saying, "Mama, I can't stop moving, I can't stop talking, I can't sit still, I can't think. HELP ME!" THAT is what ADHD feels like to a child. It was then that we decided she did need meds and it had NOTHING to do with her behavior, it was her happiness and her ability to function.

With the meds (and some short term therapy) she was able to concentrate, able to sit and read a book, could do her school work, could have a conversation with an other person without yelling and dominating and driving that person away. It made all the difference in the world.

And, actually Clinical Depression is quite common. Perhaps not all people with depression need meds, but as most depression is endogenous, meds usually help.

I HATE when people say, "Well, what are you depressed about?" Endogenous depression is internal, it has little to do with "what" is going on. It would be like saying, "Well what upset you so much so that your pancreas stopped working and now you need insulin. I don't need insulin. You just need to have a better attitude and that pesky blood sugar thing will go away."

Depression is just as medical and just as dangerous as Type I diabetes.

As for ADHD, yes, it IS caused by brain function, not "environment" ; ; and thus although therapy may help the child adapt, therapy will not "cure" ADHD. Anymore than "talk therapy" would a broken leg.
12/05/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
ADHD is not "acting out." My daughter couldn't concentrate! I remember her being about 9 and crying and saying, "Mama, I can't stop moving, I can't stop talking, I can't sit still, I can't think. HELP ME!" ... More
Amen.
12/05/2011
PiratePrincess PiratePrincess
Proper ADHD diagnosis takes a long time and must be present in multiple situations. There are many people who have ADHD and it is real and affects their lives. However, there are also some doctors who if presented with some of the ADHD symptoms, will simply prescribe medication rather than going through the lengthy testing process. It is because of these doctors that it is overdiagnosed and seen as less than clinically important. It is important that people understand that it is a real disorder and treatment (both a combination of therapy and medication if necessary) can dramatically help those who need it.
12/05/2011
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by P'Gell
ADHD is not "acting out." My daughter couldn't concentrate! I remember her being about 9 and crying and saying, "Mama, I can't stop moving, I can't stop talking, I can't sit still, I can't think. HELP ME!" ... More
I appreciate your passionate fervor, but I think this is a conversation I'm going to bow out of---I have my beliefs on the subject and I respect yours, but I don't necessarily agree.
12/05/2011
GenderSexplorations GenderSexplorations
I believe a lot of mental conditions, especially things like ADHD, are overdiagnosed but that there are some people who definitely have them. There are people who couldn't function without their medications. But there are also people who don't need their medication.
12/05/2011
voenne voenne
Quote:
Originally posted by eeep
ADHD is real, but often misdiagnosed.
Exactly. It's something easy to peg off on a child who is having trouble or acts out. They tried to diagnose me with it in middle school, and I took medication for a short period of time, but refused to after a while because it was dumb and I knew that my doctor would have diagnosed me with anything just to be done with the problem.

Unfortunately mental illness is not easy to truly understand, as we all exhibit it so differently.
12/05/2011
Ash1141 Ash1141
Completely real and completely misdiagnosed
12/06/2011
HannahPanda HannahPanda
Very misdiagnosed but also, very real.
12/09/2011
Badass Badass
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
In relation to ADHD specifically, the curriculum was extremely adamant that there is no evidence that anything is happening differently in the brain and that in most cases, the so-called disorder is just individual behavior patterns that are chosen ... More
of course its real!!
02/01/2012
jmex83 jmex83
I agree with others, I think its overdiagnosed.
02/27/2012
SilverMinxxx SilverMinxxx
Agreed, over-diagnosed.
02/28/2012
Destri Destri
It might be over-diagnosed, but that doesn't make it any less real. My hubby is ADD, and it is obvious. He isn't taking meds for it, but there is no doubt in my mind that it is a real thing.
03/01/2012
DreamWolf DreamWolf
Well, you could easily say about a lot of people they have it, but it is a much more complex thing than that, so I bet that a LOT of people are just plain misdiagnosed... :|
03/01/2012
Diabolical Kitty Diabolical Kitty
I think a lot of mental illnesses do exist. Especially bipolar and ADHD.
03/01/2012
JennSenn JennSenn
I was diagnosed at a young age with dyslexia and ADHD. I took medication and my parents put me in private schools for kids with learning disabilities and I excelled there. I think, had no one noticed and I had been left unhelped in the public school system I would have been so much worse off. I could always tell the difference when I forgot my medication.

So yeah, I think it's real. Perhaps it is too often medicated to an extreme or misdiagnosed, but it's real, and it affects people. And your professor sounds terrible.
06/28/2012
dirtythoughts:) dirtythoughts:)
Quote:
Originally posted by eeep
ADHD is real, but often misdiagnosed.
also agree.
06/28/2012
humblepie humblepie
I know both people who clearly have ADHD/ADD and need medication and people who were pretty obviously misdiagnosed and do not need it.
07/05/2012
xOhxSoxScandalousx xOhxSoxScandalousx
I believe it's real but is misdiagnosed way too often!
07/22/2012
Total posts: 25
Unique posters: 21
Cherrylane Cherrylane
As mentioned, I have to write a short essay on the curriculum and specifically two films on the subject. The overwhelming tone of the curriculum and essay question has been that ADHD doesn't exist, the field of psychology is corrupt and generally wrong and that it is wrong to give people drugs to treat a "disorder"/"illness" that "scientists have clearly not determined to actually exist," and it seems clear that the professor intends for us to reciprocate that sentiment in the assignment whole-heartedly.

Not only do I not agree with the conclusions drawn by most of the materials, I also have issues with the materials themselves. The two films she has chosen for us are PBS documentaries that focus primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of young children, anywhere from 2 to 12 years old. These documentaries do not provide a particularly rigorous and balanced approach to the issue, and the way in which they are incorporated in the assignment blatantly blurs the very different issues of whether it's possible or ethical to diagnose and medicate children at such young ages, the reasons behind medicating them etc, the legitimacy of ADHD and medication for ADHD in general.

Should I write what it seems like she wants? Should I be totally honest about my real analysis of the materials she provided to us and the ideas presented within them? Should I email her expressing my insecurity on the matter before submitting the assignment? Should I be honest and then confront her or take it to a higher up in the department if she penalizes me for disagreeing?
12/03/2011
  • Weekly Special: Hot Vibes! Buy 1 Vibrator And Get 1 FREE
  • Better Price Sale - Save 50%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 70%
  • Better Price Sale - Save 60%
  • Better Price - Save 40%
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
All promotions
- Kira - - Kira -
Wow. How terrible! What an awful teacher!!

To answer your questions:

1) I have both of the illness you list - bipolar and ADD. They are both very real and affect my ability to function in my day to day activity. I take medication for both of them and cannot function like a normal person without said medication. With the medication, I just seem a little eccentric.

2) Yes, ADD/ADHD is real. Yes, I think there are many people (especially children) who are medicated for it that need not be. All kids are hyper, but not all have ADHD. My three year old has energy that won't quit and he sometimes has the attention span of a flea. Well, yeah. He's three! Lots of times he can focus on things though so I think he'll be fine.

3) Personally, I would write the paper with my own personal information as well as scientific data to back me up. Then, if I got a bad grade I would go to the head of the school. That's just me though. I also have a seriously bad flavor for people who think mental illness is all in people's heads and an ESPECIALLY bad flavor for those who are then teaching it to others. In fact, in that situation I might bring it to the attention of someone anyone and say that I felt uncomfortable as a student with a disability. Because frankly, I would. Mental illness and the stigma that surrounds it is bad enough without teachers aiding the cause.

I'm irritated now!!
12/03/2011
Ryuson Ryuson
I think that it really depends on if this is a class you need for a major/a teacher you will have to run into again or a class you're just taking for credit. In my government class in highschool I just wrote what he wanted to hear because I felt it was just for the credit. I personally want to be a psychiatrist and if I was taking a course on child psychology I would write what I felt and support it well. I guess it depends on how serious you need to take the course!
12/04/2011
Cherry21 Cherry21
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
As mentioned, I have to write a short essay on the curriculum and specifically two films on the subject. The overwhelming tone of the curriculum and essay question has been that ADHD doesn't exist, the field of psychology is corrupt and ... More
I' send an eamil asking if you could use more materials, expand the article a little. You could still do it as a summary on why people think its not real, but take it from a point of view of someone that does know that it is real. Just tell it from your passion, and perspective. those make the best reports, summaries, articles, and even EF reviews!
12/04/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by - Kira -
Wow. How terrible! What an awful teacher!!

To answer your questions:

1) I have both of the illness you list - bipolar and ADD. They are both very real and affect my ability to function in my day to day activity. I take medication ... More
I know!

I can't stop just staring at the outline she gave us and it just makes my blood boil. I just KNOW she's looking for us to reference something from Szasz's "The Myth of Mental Illness" is some positive way but what I really want to say is that I find arguments like his intellectually lazy and generally repugnant.

Not to mention, almost all of the actual research she's had us go over is from the 1960s and the methodology is often questionable at best. I just *cant.*
12/04/2011
Alan & Michele Alan & Michele
Wow that's a tough question. First off, you should be true to yourself and stick with your knowledge that ADHD, bipolar, etc. does exist (and I TOTALLY agree with you... our room mate is an absolutely textbook adult ADHD case). If you have time, pull up some other research to cite for that part.
But you might still be able to appease your professor too by using whatever research she gave you to point out that these disorders, while a valid diagnosis in some cases, are often over-used catch phrases used to label people with simple poor behavior or a lack of self control. You know, kind of go at it from the angle of "I can agree that it doesn't exist in ALL cases, but in some cases it's real."
12/04/2011
eeep eeep
I think part of what your professor is trying to push is the issue that ADHD is not a mental deficiency, in the sense that something is not wrong with you as a human being. ADHD is not being mentally underdeveloped or brain damaged (though these things can cause ADHD symptoms). It also is not a deficiency in being a 'normal human' like you see with some other disorders where people lack things like empathy and sympathy for others. So perhaps focusing on how it does not mean the person is lacking in any of the essential human characteristics of personality and such will help you write your paper in a way that sounds like it agrees with his view more.

Also, looking at how it is misdiagnosed in children, and medication is often pushed when unnecessary could help. A lot of kids are just regular kids, they can't sit still and have trouble focusing on things they find boring or they already know. You could focus on the difference between kids who are medicated because they have trouble learning due to ADHD and those who merely have trouble adjusting to the school environment, where they have to sit still, shut up, follow all the rules, and pay attention to things they often don't want to.
12/04/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by eeep
I think part of what your professor is trying to push is the issue that ADHD is not a mental deficiency, in the sense that something is not wrong with you as a human being. ADHD is not being mentally underdeveloped or brain damaged (though these ... More
On the contrary, they seem to be pushing the idea that next to nothing can ever be wrong with someone "as a human being" in a mental context. That "wrong" is not biological truth ie the brain and body is supposed to function in a certain way and not another, but merely a social ideal. There is an extent to which what society deems acceptable is entirely relavent, but within the discussion she is asking us to have, it is framed as entirely one or the other. There is no such thing as depression, you are just very sad and suicide is a rational expression of free will. There is nothing that could possibly be happening in your brain that would determine your behavior, it is only the standards of society and how society chooses to react to whatever "eccentricities" are at hand.
12/04/2011
Crystal1 Crystal1
I would be pretty pissed about that assignment. There's enough stigma to mental illnesses without something like that trying to convince students they don't exist!

How big of a part of your grade is this? I'd be tempted to be an incredible smart-ass and do the paper with examples of how nothing else exists. There is no such thing as having a cold, your brain just gets really sad and cries out your nose. There's no such thing as war, people just don't get along sometimes. I'm not awake enough to think of real examples, but.. ARRGH. Whatever you decide to do with this, good luck! Let us know how it goes!
12/05/2011
Crystal1 Crystal1
BTW, have you talked to anyone else in the class about the assignment? Do they find it insane, too?

I'd be so tempted to take a "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" approach.
12/05/2011
Crystal1 Crystal1
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
I know!

I can't stop just staring at the outline she gave us and it just makes my blood boil. I just KNOW she's looking for us to reference something from Szasz's "The Myth of Mental Illness" is some positive way but what ... More
Sorry for the 9 million replies, but I just saw this...

You could take the approach of "In the 1960s, it was believed that blah blah blah... However, more recent medical studies show that (blah blah). For instance, in the 2011 issue of Medical Resource, Big Important Doctor is quoted as saying blah blah blah llamas. Similarly, another study that took place in 2010 found that blah blah. A third study conducted between 2005 and 2010 showed that over the five year period, yada yada yada." Basically a bit of the outdated stuff she wants to use, followed by an overwhelming amount of more up to date, factual evidence that backs up your point.
12/05/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by Crystal1
Sorry for the 9 million replies, but I just saw this...

You could take the approach of "In the 1960s, it was believed that blah blah blah... However, more recent medical studies show that (blah blah). For instance, in the 2011 issue of ... More
The thing is, the class is a sociology class, so basically, all she cares about is sociology type research, and psychology research is mostly being dismissed as part of the "medicalization" process. I wrote the essay, answered what she wanted but added a lot. It was a few pages longer than requested but whatever. I prefaced it with an apology/explanation. It's not a huge part of the grade and I have had a 97ish in the class up till no so fuck it lol.

I included a good bit on the paradox of discrimination and stigmatization. You know, because half of the sociology crap is all about pointing at psychology and psychiatry and saying "gosh, look how stigmatizing it must be for these people to be labeled disordered!" while at the same time, questioning the legitimacy of mental illness and disorder adds an entirely different type of stigma.
12/05/2011
SilverIsis SilverIsis
I actually took a class similar to this back in college called "The Sociology of Psychology" I have to say though that the teacher that I had did feel that mental illness was real, but felt that ADD itself pushed that line between an actual mental illness and simply undesirable as determined by society. Generally he cited the fact the diagnosis is often made by pediatricians and not pediatric psychiatrists and that frequently the determination is made retroactively, in the sense that the child is determined to have ADD if the medications seem to stop the undesirable behavior, rather then a through investigation of the behaviors, what trigger them, and how they impact the child's ability to function. I have to say that the class overall more focused on how mental illness impacts society as far as allocation of resources goes.


When it comes to your situation regarding the grade, honestly I would go to the ombudsmen. The teacher seems to me to have graded you unfairly and seems to be presenting a rather slanted perspective that I don't think most sociologists would share and not providing the class with a well rounded picture so that you and the other students can generate your own ideas about the subject and actually learn.
12/05/2011
Cherrylane Cherrylane
Quote:
Originally posted by SilverIsis
I actually took a class similar to this back in college called "The Sociology of Psychology" I have to say though that the teacher that I had did feel that mental illness was real, but felt that ADD itself pushed that line between an actual ... More
Exactly! I find it really frustrating because there are entirely elements of what's been presented that are legitimate. Like what you bring up about how the diagnosis is often made by pediatricians and general practitioners. That is true, and I think it's a problem.

However, when things like that have been presented in my class, it's a "so clearly this doesn't actually exist" conclusion, or, as she actually did write in our notes, that it [mental disorder generally] is entirely "socially constructed!" And I don't think that's acceptable. Finding fault in the way something is functioning in the social realm does not give any insight to whether or not mechanisms in the brain are capable of being disordered. It just doesn't. The prevalence of misdiagnosis does not mean that legitimate diagnosis is not possible. That is not an appropriate conclusion.

This whole experience has been really frustrating for me. I intended, and still do intend, to go to graduate school in this field (albiet a much different focus area). The approach this professor took with this subject makes me almost embarrassed to be so involved with the field. I think its the sort of thing that hurts the reputation of the field as a whole, social science in general. *shakes head*
12/05/2011
Silverdrop Silverdrop
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
As mentioned, I have to write a short essay on the curriculum and specifically two films on the subject. The overwhelming tone of the curriculum and essay question has been that ADHD doesn't exist, the field of psychology is corrupt and ... More
Honestly, if it were me, I'd probably withdraw from the course, and try to get my tuition refunded on the grounds that the coursework discriminates against those with mental illness.

Good luck to you, whatever you decide.
12/05/2011
eeep eeep
Quote:
Originally posted by Cherrylane
Exactly! I find it really frustrating because there are entirely elements of what's been presented that are legitimate. Like what you bring up about how the diagnosis is often made by pediatricians and general practitioners. That is true, and I ... More
I understand how you feel about being frustrated with your professor and how that reflects on your field. I had a similar issue with one of my psych professors, who put everything entirely on genetics and almost completely discounted any social variables, aside from extreme abusive circumstances (so kind of the opposite of what you are dealing with, only he backed up a lot of his specific points with sound research).
What was worse, was that he was teaching a class that was a huge part of what I want to go to grad school for. It definitely decreased my enthusiasm for the subject. Sadly, he also felt power point slides for lectures were only for research graphs or paragraphs, and sounded like a male version of the teacher in the cartoon Jimmy Neutron. Horrible class.

I often wonder how such people manage to be allowed to teach courses at the university, you would think there would be some checks in place to avoid such extreme one-sidedness, esp. when it goes against proven research.
12/06/2011
dirtythoughts:) dirtythoughts:)
Write about what you believe! This type of essay seems it should be your opinion. If she penalizes you, then go to a higher up and discuss the problem.
06/28/2012
Total posts: 17
Unique posters: 10