what should health insurance cover?

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what should health insurance cover?

married with children married with children
Should health insurance cover everything? Like free birth control, vitamins, sex change operations, ect.. Do you think that some things should be paid for out of pocket?
07/14/2011
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married with children married with children
Health insurance is so expensive, and it is only getting worse. My health and welfare is $900 a month. That is alot of money for a family. And we only take the kids in. There has to be a way to keep the cost down so that every family can afford to insure their loved ones.
07/14/2011
AngelvMaynard AngelvMaynard
Quote:
Originally posted by married with children
Health insurance is so expensive, and it is only getting worse. My health and welfare is $900 a month. That is alot of money for a family. And we only take the kids in. There has to be a way to keep the cost down so that every family can afford ...
We owned our own biz for several years and the healthcare cost was one of the determining factors in closing it. The cost is insane and driven by greedy executives. I believe elective surgeries should be out of pocket unless their is a medical reason they are needed. If that makes sense. A boon job just for the sake of bigger boobs, not covered. But a women getting her boobs restructured to due loss of cancer should be covered.
07/14/2011
DeliciousSurprise DeliciousSurprise
Quote:
Originally posted by AngelvMaynard
We owned our own biz for several years and the healthcare cost was one of the determining factors in closing it. The cost is insane and driven by greedy executives. I believe elective surgeries should be out of pocket unless their is a medical reason ...
Well, if you're going there...


What's "medically necessary"? An abortion isn't "necessary." Should that be covered? What about fertility treatments? What about male gynecomastia surgery? That's also not *necessary*
07/14/2011
AngelvMaynard AngelvMaynard
Quote:
Originally posted by DeliciousSurprise
Well, if you're going there...


What's "medically necessary"? An abortion isn't "necessary." Should that be covered? What about fertility treatments? What about male gynecomastia surgery? That's also not *necessary*
Took me a minute, had to go look up gynecomastia I'm totally pro choice! However, with that being said I think unless the mother is in danger it's elective. Fertility would be a medical cost because it is a defect in normal reproduction if either partner has an abnormality that is preventing pregnancy, gynecomastia isn't something I know much about so no opinion. Then again I'm not a doctor nor would I want to intercede in anyones medical decisions. These are just my opinions as I see them. You know what they say about opinions and ....... Everyones got one.
07/14/2011
El-Jaro El-Jaro
I think that if a doctor signs off on it, your health insurance should cover it.
07/14/2011
P'Gell P'Gell
Quote:
Originally posted by AngelvMaynard
Took me a minute, had to go look up gynecomastia I'm totally pro choice! However, with that being said I think unless the mother is in danger it's elective. Fertility would be a medical cost because it is a defect in normal reproduction if ...
I refuse to debate abortion, but insurance should cover it in the first trimester if desired, because it will cost MUCH less than the birth of a child and the care of that child for the next 24 years. Birth control of ALL types should be covered. Vitamins ONLY if a physician prescribes them. Such as Folic Acid during pregnancy. I don't think (and this is an educated opinion) that an otherwise healthy person needs to take vitamins for optimal health.

The word "elective" before surgery only means that it isn't an emergency and the patient can schedule it when they can fit it in, it doesn't mean it isn't necessary. One can have an "elective" gall bladder surgery, an elective hysterectomy, an elective tumor removal. Most mastectomies due to cancer are elective procedures, because the patient can schedule them after getting her affairs in order. The only NON elective mastectomies are those done when immediate spreading of the cancer is imminent.

I don't think fertility treatments should be included. They are so expensive and not all that effective for many people. Maybe a few rounds of Clomid, but nothing beyond that. Although the testing should be covered to see if something is wrong. NOT having kids isn't a medical problem that effects one's health.

Sex change operations; it may determine whether someone lives or dies. More transgendered people commit suicide than almost any other issue. It's sad. Nobody has a sex change without a LOT of thought going into it.
07/14/2011
Ansley Ansley
There are thousands of treatments available for a thousand different ailments, so to list all of what should and shouldn't be covered would keep me here all day.

There was a study done in Australia...I'll have to dig up the information, but it concerned gender reassignment surgeries. I believe more than half of the patients stated they wished they'd never had the surgery in the first place.

I definitely do not believe fertility treatments should be covered, as having a child is a choice not a necessity. (Plus, adoption and all that jazz.)
07/14/2011
Ms. Spice Ms. Spice
i kind of wish we didn't have political questions on Eden to begin with, because they always seem to incite a lot of drama and anger here. but i think whatever the dr. signs off on, like JR said.
07/14/2011
P'Gell P'Gell
What little info I could find on "Sex Change Regret" were all religious based sites.

Wikipedia seems to have numbers from actual clinics. Here's the data: Regrets and detransitions

People who undergo sex reassignment surgery can develop regret for the procedure later in life, largely due to lack of support from family or peers, with recent data suggesting a rate of 3.8%.[42]... In a 2001 study of 232 MTF patients who underwent GRS none of the patients reported complete regret and only 6% reported partial or occasional regrets. END QUOTE italics mine

From what I have seen read and people I have talked to who have transitioned, the process pre-surgery is rigorous. Most have to live as the sex they need to be for at least a year, there are hormone treatments etc. The "regret" rate seems to actually be extremely low, unless you look at religious based sites who have an agenda.
07/14/2011
Ansley Ansley
Scouring a couple of forums real quick on transgenderism and post-op communities, it seems as if they are more reluctant to bring up any dissatisfaction felt out of fear of being ridiculed even more.

Renee Richards and Dani Berry are two of the most famous, outspoken people who had undergone resassignment surgery only to later learn that it was for the wrong reasons. While pre-op care has significantly changed in many communities throughout the free world, there is still not enough evidence to suggest that transitioning is medically beneficial. Those who were in bad situations, emotional/mental places, or bad personal relationships will often remain in those situations after surgery without proper post-op therapy. Whatever, proper post-op therapy actually is for a person with GID is up in the air.

I cannot imagine what one most go through when they wake up post-op and realize, the parts are different but the brain is still the same. The parts are just now, non-orgasmic in most cases.

Renee Richards thought she had it all figured out and was well on her way to being the person she had dreamed of being. In her autobiography she states that she was just a sex obsessed transvestite and did not suffer from GID.

So, essentially the point is there is a very real possibility that the therapy approach taken in the medical community is entirely misguided and GID can sometimes mirror the issues of another disorder. Those presumed to have GID are often too afraid to tell their therapists every minute detail that would distinguish the difference between GID and say, disassociative disorder.

Additionally, I believe there are far more MTF in the world that do not want bottom surgery and are happy to leave things as they are. Regret comes in many forms and it doesn't always revolve around the actual procedure. But, is instead a result of intolerance, ignorance and the let down that they still didn't feel like a natural woman or a natural man as they had so desired. This leads to increased depression, isolation and in some cases - suicide.
07/14/2011
married with children married with children
Quote:
Originally posted by Ms. Spice
i kind of wish we didn't have political questions on Eden to begin with, because they always seem to incite a lot of drama and anger here. but i think whatever the dr. signs off on, like JR said.
Drama and anger are actions of children. This is a site for adults. We should be able to discuss any subject without those showing up. And this is not really a political question. I have just seen my health insurance go up, again, every year for the past 10. How much longer can we afford to pay for insurance? It is a simple question. How much do people think that their insurance should cover? From the post on here, it seems that most people want it to cover everything, which is a big reason why the cost of insurance has skyrocketed.

If you would like, I could post the same questions as most. What is your favorite toy material? What is your favorite position?
07/14/2011
Taylor Taylor
I wish that insurance would have covered seeing a dietician when I first started my recovery for an eating disorder. I think it might have helped prevent having to go to an inpatient facility if I'd been able to see a therapist more than a few times and to be able to see a dietician.

I don't know if insurance SHOULD have covered that, but I believe my recovery process would have gone a lot smoother if it had covered those things
07/14/2011
Total posts: 13
Unique posters: 8