Common Mistakes Seen in Reviews Lately

Girly Juice Girly Juice
I've been a review editor for a while now, and these mistakes come up again and again in the reviews that I edit. If you want to help out your editors, you can comb through your reviews before submission to make sure you didn't make any of these incredibly common errors

1. There is no such word as "alot." The phrase you're looking for is "a lot" - or, even better, "many."

2. Generally, it's incorrect to describe a sex toy as "discrete," which is a word that has its own meaning and is not the same as "discreet" (the word you are probably looking for).

3. When talking about a "spot," like the G-spot or P-spot, those letters (G and P) should always be capitalized. The G and P both stand for something (in this case, Grafenberg and prostate), so they need to be capitalized.

4. The word is spelled "silicone," not "silicon" (which is a different thing).

5. Make sure you're spelling "definitely" correctly. (This is particularly hilarious when people mistakenly use the word "defiantly," which means something completely different!)

6. Make sure you are using enough commas that your sentences are clear. Sometimes, people will write extremely long sentences that have multiple sections but don't have any commas; this type of sentence can be very hard to read and is easy to misunderstand.

7. Don't use commas when you're starting a new/unconnected part of your sentence. There are many situations in which people use commas when they should be using semicolons (e.g. "I like this vibrator, my husband liked it too"), colons (e.g. "This vibrator has three functions, low, medium, and high"), or even starting a new sentence altogether (e.g. "This vibrator is great, I also found that it works well when used with a dildo").

8. Lube types are always hyphenated (water-based, silicone-based, oil-based) - they should not be written as two separate words or as one word. And if you're making a list, it should be hyphenated as well (e.g. "This toy can be used with water-, silicone-, or oil-based lubes"). I know it looks weird, but it's correct.

9. Qualifiers like "latex-free" and "phthalates-free" should always be hyphenated like that. Also, words like latex and phthalates should not be capitalized, as they are not proper nouns.

10. "Waterproof" is one word.

11. Don't forget apostrophes where they're needed, and don't use them where they're not needed! "Its" and "it's" are not the same thing; "dildo's" is incorrect unless you're trying to say "dildo is"; and basic words like "let's" can be completely altered in meaning by the addition or subtraction of an apostrophe.
01/14/2013
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Sammi Sammi
Thanks, Girly Juice!
01/14/2013
js250 js250
Great post!! We can all use a refresher course and can favorite this one...
01/15/2013
spiced spiced
I felt pretty smug the first time I read your post--until I decided to check my most recent review (which you edited). Wouldn't you know I used discrete in place of discreet? Oops!

Thanks for this! I'm a grammar nerd, too, and it pains me to see the continuing downfall of the English language.

Keep fighting the good fight.
01/15/2013
Trysexual Trysexual
Thank you Girly. So true...commas are a disappearing beast around here altogether.
01/15/2013
Gary Gary
Great post!!
01/15/2013
FlashFuchsia FlashFuchsia
Thank you so much!

Remember: YOU'RE going TO be happy when EF tells you THEY'RE going to ship TWO of THEIR new toys THERE to YOUR house, TOO.
01/15/2013
Ansley Ansley
Quote:
Originally posted by Gary
Great post!!
Agreed!!!
01/15/2013
Rossie Rossie
Awesome post...I've bookmarked it!
01/15/2013
Willowe Willowe
So nice to see this BEFORE I started working on another review! Thanks for the tips/reminders. I'm sure I've messed up a few of those once or twice before, but hopefully I won't again!
01/15/2013
spiced spiced
Here's another one: You may LOSE your pants if your belt is too LOOSE. I've seen that one wrong a lot lately.
01/15/2013
HarlequinBunnie HarlequinBunnie
Thank you so much for pointing this problem out. I know I will be more mindful in the future when I am writing a review.
01/15/2013
Hermosura21 Hermosura21
Great post
01/15/2013
Sodom and Gomorrah Sodom and Gomorrah
Thanks you're fabulous!
02/07/2013
namelesschaos namelesschaos
I'm reminded of the silicon v. silicone thing today as a professor was in front of the class discussing an art work based around a real-doll and keep saying silicon instead of silicone. It was one of those "don't throw book at professor's head" "don't throw book at professor's head" moments.
02/07/2013
XYCopperheadSly XYCopperheadSly
I think I love you for making this post.
02/07/2013
GONE! GONE!
Wonderful post!
02/08/2013
Lady of the Lab Lady of the Lab
A possible #12 --> "Punctuation always goes inside quotation marks, not outside."

Something I learned from Girly Juice being my mentor ^.^
04/25/2013
Rokmai Rokmai
Quote:
Originally posted by spiced
I felt pretty smug the first time I read your post--until I decided to check my most recent review (which you edited). Wouldn't you know I used discrete in place of discreet? Oops!

Thanks for this! I'm a grammar nerd, too, and it ... More
I never even noticed there was a "discreet". Blowin' my mind here.
04/25/2013
myloverseyes myloverseyes
Thank you!! I'll be sure to keep my eye on that!
04/28/2013
FieryRed FieryRed
Oh, thank you, thank you, thank you!

"6. Make sure you are using enough commas that your sentences are clear. Sometimes, people will write extremely long sentences that have multiple sections but don't have any commas; this type of sentence can be very hard to read and is easy to misunderstand."

Ahem. I've had correct commas edited out of my reviews, and incorrect commas edited in.

I nearly always see perineum spelled incorrectly: perenium, perinium, etc.
05/12/2013
FieryRed FieryRed
Quote:
Originally posted by Lady of the Lab
A possible #12 --> "Punctuation always goes inside quotation marks, not outside."

Something I learned from Girly Juice being my mentor ^.^
Actually, not always!

1. When the question itself is inside the quotations, the question mark should be, too:

She asked, "Do you like this toy?"

If the question is being asked outside of the quotation, though, the question mark should be outside the quotations:

Do you agree with the saying, "All knowledge is worth having"?

2. With periods and commas, the American style is to always put them inside the quotation marks, but the correct British style is to only place them inside the quotation marks if they belong to the quoted material. So, unless EF has made a definitive choice between American and British style, both ways can be correct.

American style: The sign switched from "Walk" to "Don't Walk."

British style: The sign switched from "Walk" to "Don't Walk".
05/12/2013
FieryRed FieryRed
Quote:
Originally posted by Girly Juice
I've been a review editor for a while now, and these mistakes come up again and again in the reviews that I edit. If you want to help out your editors, you can comb through your reviews before submission to make sure you didn't make any of ... More
Oooh, one more little picky detail:

>"dildo's" is incorrect unless you're trying to say "dildo is"

"Dildo's" would also be correct if you're trying to use the possessive form, as in, "The dildo's dimensions are..."

05/12/2013
FlashFuchsia FlashFuchsia
The same is true for abbreviations. The plural of STD spelled "STDs", not "STD's". "STD's" is possessive or a contraction of "STD is".
05/14/2013
FieryRed FieryRed
Quote:
Originally posted by FlashFuchsia
The same is true for abbreviations. The plural of STD spelled "STDs", not "STD's". "STD's" is possessive or a contraction of "STD is".
You know, I thought that too, but recently I read that an apostrophe IS correct when using the plural of an acronym or abbreviation, or a number (such as, "the 80's"). I'll have to look that up, now! (It always looks weird to me to see the apostrophe there, anyway.)
05/15/2013
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
While I feel like these grammar issues are all appropriate -- I particularly agree with silicon/e and have even pointed it out myself -- the topic title could be a little incendiary.

Considering that we're talking about a review and not a doctoral thesis, I'm willing to let things go as long as they don't cause confusion or make a review difficult to read. I, personally, don't always capitalize "G-spot" and such because I am a lazy typer, but if that stops you from getting the gist, it's your fault.
05/15/2013
Adriana Ravenlust Adriana Ravenlust
Quote:
Originally posted by FieryRed
Actually, not always!

1. When the question itself is inside the quotations, the question mark should be, too:

She asked, "Do you like this toy?"

If the question is being asked outside of the quotation, though, the ... More
Yes, the punctuation varies greatly. If you were discussing something that might have punctuation in it (I sometimes write about using code), putting periods and such after quotes becomes necessary!
05/15/2013
Allison.Wilder Allison.Wilder
Awesome post! I always knew that something like 'water-based' should be hyphenated, but I was not aware that I should be hyphenating when I was writing a list.
05/15/2013
Total posts: 28
Unique posters: 22