parabens

big b big b
parabens what is it and how bad are thay?
05/28/2011
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agf agf
Paraben is a preservative. It is linked with breast cancer in 1 or 2 studies over the last years.

Like always, there is not a definitive answer and you will find it on many products. At the moment FDA say it can use it and it does not cause cancer at low dose.

What we do know about parabens? it is absorbed too quickly by our skin. That is why studies showed paraben in the urine on people that used products with parabens.

It is the cheapest preservative out there, that is why is used. You have many lubricants without parabens. For example Sliquid using Potassium Sorbate wich is by far safer than parabens or PEG's (Polyethylene glycol)
05/29/2011
big b big b
Quote:
Originally posted by agf
Paraben is a preservative. It is linked with breast cancer in 1 or 2 studies over the last years.

Like always, there is not a definitive answer and you will find it on many products. At the moment FDA say it can use it and it does not cause ... More
thanks very much,i saw in alot of reviews it was a con and did not know why.
05/30/2011
Selective Sensualist Selective Sensualist
There have been Internet rumors that parabens are associated with cancer, but those claims are based upon animal studies where the animals were fed *extremely high* and unrealistic dosages of parabens.

There are many things that we are exposed to on a daily basis that are harmful if we are exposed to a high enough dosage---yet are perfectly safe in smaller dosages (vitamins, for example).

As far as being associated with cancer in humans, parabens have been deemed safe in the small dosage amounts needed to serve as a preservative. Parabens have been used for decades in food items to prevent spoilage and the growth of dangerous microorganisms, and they have been approved by the FDA for consumption. Parabens are also routinely used in cosmetic products. This is an informative web page on a reputable site: link.

However, parabens are listed as a con on lube reviews because they can cause terribly painful stinging and burning sensations as well as skin inflammations on those who have paraben sensitivity when there are microscopic tears present in the skin. Since the membranous tissues are so delicate, it is quite common to have microscopic tears in the genital region. Hence, anyone with a known paraben sensitivity should steer clear of such products.

I also think that US cosmetic manufacturers put more than the necessary dosage amount in their products than is needed (perhaps just as an extra measure to make absolutely certain that microorganisms do not breed and multiply). Such increased exposure to parabens can make more people vulnerable to developing a paraben sensitivity. For example, the US market exposes consumers to a higher percentage of parabens than does the European market. And the US has a higher percentage of people who have paraben sensitivity. Since there seems to be a positive correlation between exposure to parabens and development of paraben sensitivity, I try to avoid parabens in lube for this very reason.

I discuss the concerns about parabens in my Anal Lube review (see the Mathyparaben discussion, which is bolded under the Personal Comments sections): link. Under the discussion of parabens, there are links to some great websites where you can research the safety of almost all the ingredients found in cosmetic items.
05/30/2011
big b big b
Quote:
Originally posted by Selective Sensualist
There have been Internet rumors that parabens are associated with cancer, but those claims are based upon animal studies where the animals were fed *extremely high* and unrealistic dosages of parabens.

There are many things that we are ... More
great info! thanks very much
05/30/2011
agf agf
Quote:
Originally posted by Selective Sensualist
There have been Internet rumors that parabens are associated with cancer, but those claims are based upon animal studies where the animals were fed *extremely high* and unrealistic dosages of parabens.

There are many things that we are ... More
I have to say you are given wrong information saying the studies was made in animals.

"However. In a 2004 study published by the Journal of Applied Toxicology, 18 of 20 malignant breast tumors showed high concentrations of parabens, which are known to mimic estrogen in the body and affect the growth of breast tissue. Dr. Darbre, one of the chief scientists on the study, acknowledged that “One would expect tumours to occur evenly, with 20 per cent arising in each of the five areas of the breast … But these results help explain why up to 60 per cent of all breast tumours are found in just one-fifth of the breast – the upper-outer quadrant, nearest the underarm” (Source)"

That is animals to you? those are internet rumors? my god..
source:link
source:link


Everybody knows parabens can mimic estrogen, even the ones that says parabens are safe. Parabens is absorbed by the skin everybody knows that too.
05/30/2011
Selective Sensualist Selective Sensualist
Quote:
Originally posted by agf
I have to say you are given wrong information saying the studies was made in animals.

"However. In a 2004 study published by the Journal of Applied Toxicology, 18 of 20 malignant breast tumors showed high concentrations of parabens, which ... More
I am careful about selecting my sources of information—especially on the Internet, which is rife with misinformed interpretations and conclusions about research studies. I wasn't "given wrong information" nor was I calling people animals. I was pointing to one research study that successfully established a clear correlation between cancer and highly concentrated paraben consumption in test animals while you are pointing to another study that established only an association with parabens found in human breast tissue. The study on human breast tissue did not establish a clear-cut correlation (let alone causation) due to faulty research methods in failing to establish a control sample of identically evaluated healthy tissue. This particular study is also referenced on the website I linked above.

And yes, I mentioned parabens' estrogen-mimicking behavior in my review, and it is also discussed on the linked web page I provided above. I did not rehash everything here because I thought people would take the time to read the links if they were interested. Regarding the estrogen-mimicking behavior of parabens, one would have to take extremely concentrated, huge dosage amounts of parabens for them to have that type of effect in the human body. That would be near to impossible to obtain those kinds of levels in a normal diet or in normal cosmetic application since the percentage amounts in those products are so small.

I am not, by any means, an advocate or staunch defender of parabens. I always advocate taking precautions with anything that could prove dangerous. I just like to separate the actual facts from speculation. I was only stating that at this point there is only speculation but no clear-cut proof that parabens cause cancer when consumed or applied in the low levels approved by the FDA. Does this mean that I think they are 100% safe? No, but I don't want to falsely promote undue hysteria about it. But I definitely view parabens with suspicion because of the number of people who have developed a topical sensitivity to them and will choose a product without them if I'm given a choice.

Sadly, however, it would be nearly impossible to eliminate them from consumption altogether (either ingested or topically applied) since they are so prevalent in the marketplace. Anyone who is concerned about parabens should start reading their food labels (not just their cosmetic labels) and petitioning the FDA to eliminate any amount of parabens in their food. Parabens have been used in food for decades, which can explain the presence of parabens in body cells and in urine. Parabens are even found in infant-care items. But until further research shows a positive correlation between cancer and the currently approved dosage amounts for human consumption and topical application, the FDA will not take these petitions seriously.



The following is from the FDA's statement about parabens (which is linked at the bottom of the web page that I linked in my earlier post above, but here is the direct link as well as a quote from the page): link

"Are there health risks associated with the use of parabens in cosmetics?

The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) reviewed the safety of methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben in 1984 and concluded they were safe for use in cosmetic products at levels up to 25%. Typically parabens are used at levels ranging from 0.01 to 0.3%.

On November 14, 2003, the CIR began the process to reopen the safety assessments of methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben in order to offer interested parties an opportunity to submit new data for consideration. In September 2005, the CIR decided to re-open the safety assessment for parabens to request exposure estimates and a risk assessment for cosmetic uses. In December 2005, after considering the margins of safety for exposure to women and infants, the Panel determined that there was no need to change its original conclusion that parabens are safe as used in cosmetics. (The CIR is an industry-sponsored organization that reviews cosmetic ingredient safety and publishes its results in open, peer-reviewed literature. FDA participates in the CIR in a non-voting capacity.)

A study published in 2004 (Darbre, in the Journal of Applied Toxicology) detected parabens in breast tumors. The study also discussed this information in the context of the weak estrogen-like properties of parabens and the influence of estrogen on breast cancer. However, the study left several questions unanswered. For example, the study did not show that parabens cause cancer, or that they are harmful in any way, and the study did not look at possible paraben levels in normal tissue.

FDA is aware that estrogenic activity in the body is associated with certain forms of breast cancer. Although parabens can act similarly to estrogen, they have been shown to have much less estrogenic activity than the body’s naturally occurring estrogen. For example, a 1998 study (Routledge et al., in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology) found that the most potent paraben tested in the study, butylparaben, showed from 10,000- to 100,000-fold less activity than naturally occurring estradiol (a form of estrogen). Further, parabens are used at very low levels in cosmetics. In a review of the estrogenic activity of parabens, (Golden et al., in Critical Reviews in Toxicology, 2005) the author concluded that based on maximum daily exposure estimates, it was implausible that parabens could increase the risk associated with exposure to estrogenic chemicals.

FDA believes that at the present time there is no reason for consumers to be concerned about the use of cosmetics containing parabens. However, the agency will continue to evaluate new data in this area. If FDA determines that a health hazard exists, the agency will advise the industry and the public, and will consider its legal options under the authority of the FD&C Act in protecting the health and welfare of consumers."
05/30/2011
Selective Sensualist Selective Sensualist
Here is a quote from the web page linked in my original post that describes how research studies attempting to correlate paraben-related endocrine disruption to cancer in humans have been discredited by the majority of researchers in the scientific community:

"More Information:

Some scientific studies have suggested that butyl and possibly propylparaben can mimic the effect of the endocrine hormone estrogen when tested at very high concentrations in cell cultures and female mice. This effect is sometimes referred to as endocrine disruption. Some recent studies have claimed that there is a link between Paraben exposure, particularly in underarm cosmetics, and breast cancer caused by endocrine disruption. These studies have been largely discredited by the scientific community, particularly by those who study the toxic effects of chemicals on the body. In fact, scientists who study the effects of products on the population (epidemiologists) have found no direct link between underarm products and breast cancer (1).

Many materials found in plants used as food also have an estrogenic effect. These naturally occurring materials are called phytoestrogens and are present in soy and other fruits and vegetables. Some of these phytoestrogens, when tested in the same way as Parabens, give similar estrogen-like results. However, Parabens have been shown to be 10,000 times weaker than the most potent phytoestrogens and 100,000 times less potent than estradiol, the estrogen produced naturally by the body. Most scientists agree that there is no endocrine-disrupting effect from the use of Parabens in cosmetic and personal care products because their action, if any, is so weak.
"

link
05/30/2011
agf agf
there are people that say paraben are safe. there are people that are not sure because there are not long term studies, there are people who says paraben is not safe.

for me is pretty easy, is some ingredient is linked in any way to cancer, I will avoid it. I don't care if it is true or not, if the information is there there is a reason. We are not talking about 1 or 2 sites saying parabens are linked to cancer. There are a lot, and many of them are pretty serious.

I really don't trust on what companies say, they wont care about long term effect on people. And they only want to keep making money. So I guess it will be more people trying to say parabens are safe, than people trying to say they are not.

Paraben is linked to cancer. Internet is what it is. We can not say internet have wrong information about parabens, but good information about aloe vera. So if I find bad things about some ingredient all
over the net, I guess it will be better to find an alternative.

A lot of people say phthalates are not bad, and a lot say they are. Then everyone of us buy what we want. Same for parabens.

At this moment there are a lot of products without parabens. I dont have any one with parabens, PEG, DMDM or any of those cheap preservatives. So it is not that hard.
05/31/2011
MaryExy MaryExy
I admit, I can't read all of that now. I usually try finding products without parabens, phthalates, etc. just to avoid the issue of whether they're safe or not. If I'm ever displeased with the selection of p-free products, I'll research these chemicals further. I've also always been told I have super-sensitive skin, so I try to stay away from anything that's supposed to be remotely irritating. I'm a worry-wart...

But one thing to consider: if these chemicals are still on the market after all the debating over safety, they probably can't affect you TOO much... *cowers in the corner to avoid getting attacked*
05/31/2011
Shellz31 Shellz31
I don't care whether the studies are correct or not. They have done studies on things in the past and said they are perfectly safe, only to find down the track that they actually are harmful.
I guess ya have to weigh up whether you're happy to take the risk or not.

If there are lubes around that are natural, then I'm going to use those over the ones loaded with chemicals that are not needed in the body. There's enough shit our bodies have to deal with, without deliberately loading it with more.
05/31/2011
Shellz31 Shellz31
Quote:
Originally posted by Selective Sensualist
I am careful about selecting my sources of information—especially on the Internet, which is rife with misinformed interpretations and conclusions about research studies. I wasn't "given wrong information" nor was I calling people ... More
Interesting, I have NEVER come across parabens over here in food.
Perhaps they don't allow it here in foods - might explain why we don't get American food here in the shops .... apart from the odd fruit variety.
05/31/2011
Selective Sensualist Selective Sensualist
Quote:
Originally posted by agf
there are people that say paraben are safe. there are people that are not sure because there are not long term studies, there are people who says paraben is not safe.

for me is pretty easy, is some ingredient is linked in any way to cancer, I ... More
I don't care what companies say either. But I also don't place much weight on what those who simply speculate based on inconclusive, unvalidated, and flawed studies say; I place more weight on what peer-reviewed and scientifically validated and objective research supports.

Just because one can find certain information on the Internet does not make it fact. You have to evaluate the source of the information. There is widespread misinformation all over the Internet since there is no regulation at all regarding what is posted. People do not have to have any credentials at all to post whatever they like. Therefore, when gathering information online it is imperative to choose your sources wisely by evaluating the source's credentials.

The beauty of the worldwide, peer-reviewed scientific community is the fact that other scientists who understand the research criteria can validate and critique the methods and conclusions. I trust the evaluation of other scientists across the globe in multiple countries, not the evaluation of lay people who do not understand the basics of research methodology and statistics.

That said, if I can avoid parabens, I will to the greatest extent possible; but I mainly do so because of the known sensitivity and irritation that people can develop in response to them. I choose lubes without parabens all the time. I prefer Sliquid's and Hathor Aphrodisia Pure lubes.

For those who are concerned about avoiding parabens altogether, start checking the labels on your medications, baby wipes/wet wipes, toothpaste, detergents, shampoos, lotions, antiperspirants, cosmetics, fruit juices, frozen dairy products, salad dressings, processed vegetables, jams, and other food items as well---not just on your lubes. Look out for any word that ends with -paraben or has -para- or p- in it, such as methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, benzylparaben, isopropylparaben, Benzyl-parahydroxybenz oic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), Methyl-parahydroxybenz oic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), Ethyl-parahydroxybenzo ic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), Propyl-parahydroxybenz oic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), Butyl-parahydroxybenzo ic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), Parahydroxybenzoic acid (p-hydroxybenzoic acid), and Parahydroxybenzoate (p-hydroxybenzoate). (Note: Butylparaben is the only paraben that is known to weakly imitate estrogen. However, at a dosage level that is 25,000 times higher than the dosage amount allowed in products, it is still 100,000 times weaker than the naturally occurring estrogen in the human body.)
05/31/2011
agf agf
at least here you don't find parabens in food. You do find it on cheap cosmetic, and you can find also cheap cosmetic without parabens.

It is not the same if we use shampoos with parabens than a lotion that will be absorbed by the skin.
06/01/2011
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