harmful chemicals in toy cleaners

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harmful chemicals in toy cleaners

Rod Ronald Rod Ronald
Advanced smart cleaner foaming toy sanitizer
Related to: 
Is there any known harmful chemicals in toy cleaners I should look out for?
01/25/2012
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Beck Beck
I just looked at the product page and that one happens to say that it is Glycerin free and paraben free, so I think that is all you have to worry about, but I am not an expert.
01/25/2012
El-Jaro El-Jaro
It depends if you're known to be allergic or sensitive to anything. If you aren't, then you should be ok with anything out there.

If a product isn't safe, it wouldn't be for sale. I'm talking verifiably unsafe, not "could be".
01/25/2012
Rin (aka Nire) Rin (aka Nire)
Unless you've got an allergy, I can't imagine that any of them would be unsafe. Obviously, you want to be sure that a toy is free of any cleaner before actually using it, but the same could go for normal soap in most cases.
01/25/2012
Elnoa Elnoa
That depends on your definition of "harmful". Many ingredients are harmful in ways that common folks are not aware of. I'll break it down for you. In this case, the ingredients are: Triclosan, Disodium Cacoamphodiacetate, Sodium Trideceth Sulfates, Propylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Phenoxyethanol, Purified water

Triclosan is the antibacterial agent, and has recently been the cause of some debate in the medical community, but not because of it's toxicity to humans. However, extended and unnecessary use of this chemical can cause swift resistance in bacteria, leading to the dreaded "superbugs". When your normal skin bacterial, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis, become resistant to antibiotics, problems happen.

Disodium Cacoamphodiacetate and Sodium Trideceth Sulfate are synthetic surfactants (soap, if you will) made from coconut oil. Such surfactants, when washed into the ocean, are causing something known as "ecological death" of schooling fishes and other organisms that rely on chemical communication. If you want more information about this, message me.

Propylene Glycol is a solvent, used to dissolve the other ingredients. This is toxic to cats in small doses, but only toxic to humans (and dogs) in very large doses. Some people are allergic to it. When this chemical is washed into water sources, bacteria that break it down use so much oxygen that the water becomes anoxic, killing other organisms.

Citric Acid is, in this case, a preservative. I wouldn't worry about it, really.

Phenoxyethanol is used to dissolve hydrophobic chemicals, a preservative and as a bacteriacide. My comments above, for Triclosan, apply here. However, it has come into frequent use only fairly recently (the previous chemical released formaldehyde, this does not!) and the effects of long-term exposure are, as yet, unknown.


Hope this helps!
01/26/2012
El-Jaro El-Jaro
Quote:
Originally posted by Elnoa
That depends on your definition of "harmful". Many ingredients are harmful in ways that common folks are not aware of. I'll break it down for you. In this case, the ingredients are: Triclosan, Disodium Cacoamphodiacetate, Sodium ...
You rock!

Talk nerdy to me!
01/26/2012
nori nori
Thanks for asking! this was super helpful to me.
06/20/2012
saunders1971 saunders1971
Quote:
Originally posted by Beck
I just looked at the product page and that one happens to say that it is Glycerin free and paraben free, so I think that is all you have to worry about, but I am not an expert.
i totally agree with you
08/14/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
Triclosan is not an antibiotic, it's a bacteriocide. It kills bacteria ON things, not IN things and does so in a different way than antibiotics do.

Antibiotics kill, in part, my using the host's immune system as part of its action. Bacteriocides simply provide "surface kill" by killing bacteria and pathogens by touching them. Most feel it doesn't work in a way to "teach" bacteria to over come its effects, nor does it leave behind enough "weakened" bacteria to classify as causing "antibiotic resistant strains" of bacteria.

Many good sources feel that bacteriocides such as Triclosan, chlorine bleach, rubbing alcohol etc DO NOT contribute to antibiotic resistant bacteria, and I agree with them. These chemicals work in a totally different way than actual antibiotics (which can cause antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain situations) and many experts feel they do not present the same kind of threats as antibiotic overuse does.

Triclosan does cause skin reactions in some sensitive individuals, but there is no good evidence that it causes any more "antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria" than plain old rubbing alcohol or bleach does. (Which is zero to none.)
08/14/2012
c365 c365
Very informative. You should know what ingredients you are allergic to and always check ingredients listings.
08/18/2012
Gone (LD29) Gone (LD29)
I just received a bottle of this cleaner with my last order, and the ingredients have changed! It no longer contains triclosan.

The ingredients list on my bottle is as follows:
Purified Water (Aqua), Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate, Sodium Trideceth Sulfate, Propylene Glycol, Benzalkonium Chloride, Zinc Gluconate, Citric Acid, Phenoxyethanol

I'm not sure if these changes make the product better or worse...
09/28/2012
travelnurse travelnurse
Some things such as chlorhexidine are a great thing to have!
09/28/2012
kandy anjel kandy anjel
Quote:
Originally posted by Rod Ronald
Is there any known harmful chemicals in toy cleaners I should look out for?
ive used this before and i havent found anything harmful
06/02/2013
Total posts: 13
Unique posters: 12