Clone your dead pet for a $100,000

Clone your dead pet for a $100,000

Rod Ronald Rod Ronald
Recently a man had his blue tic hound who passed away cloned for $100,000. Would you ever spend that much money to have one of your beloved pets cloned. Or would you just realize it was only going to die again, making it that much harder?
Answers (private voting - your screen name will NOT appear in the results):
If I had the money I would do it with out thinking
4  (7%)
No, one passing was enough for me.
47  (77%)
Other. Please explain
10  (16%)
Total votes: 61
Poll is closed
11/16/2012
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Passion plum Passion plum
I don't think that is something I could do.
11/16/2012
potstickers potstickers
I wouldn't. It wouldn't be the same animal. It'd have a different personality and different color patterns. Even worse, it'd die early and have health problems due to its epigenetics being all wonky.
11/16/2012
Intrepid Niddering Intrepid Niddering
I wouldn't do it simply because it's ridiculous. I'm not sad that, "Oh, if I clone it, I will lose it all over again." Everything dies. You're born, then you spend the rest of your time slowly dying. That's just ridiculous to even consider spending that much on some animal. If I really wanted another pet, I'd just go get another pet.
11/16/2012
inkky inkky
I'd Have To Go Through The Pain Of Losing That Pet Twice In My Life, No Thanks
11/16/2012
VioletMoonstone VioletMoonstone
If I was rich... I'd be eccentric and rich and I'd totally do it! I'm really into science and I think it would be really cool. I find it beautiful in a way to have your pet live again. It's neat! Hopefully I would have named him Frankenweenie.
11/16/2012
travelnurse travelnurse
I really don't see myself doing that even if I had the money.
11/16/2012
Inkkythesquid Inkkythesquid
Probably not
11/16/2012
Rossie Rossie
Although I love my pet dearly, I don't want to clone him when he passes.
11/16/2012
marshmallow marshmallow
no!
11/17/2012
MissCandyland MissCandyland
Oh heck no. I had a cat for over 17 years and he passed away. I have a hard enough time seeing video and photos of him because it is just too hard.
11/17/2012
spineyogurt spineyogurt
thats dumb
11/17/2012
Allstars316 Allstars316
Nope
11/17/2012
LAndJ LAndJ
No, I loved my pet, but it's not worth it.
11/17/2012
KyotoAngel KyotoAngel
As much as I loved my pets, I wouldn't do it even if it costed one dollar...watching them die once was enough thanks, and I feel that it would be really mean to make a "copy" of them.
I can only imagine how hurt the "original" would be once the clone wound up in heaven too. =<
I know if I died I wouldn't be all that happy if my mother made a clone of me...it'd feel like she was replacing me, and I'm convinced pets have feelings just like we do.
11/17/2012
Ryuson Ryuson
The thing is you don't end up with another Ralph or Woofy or Fluffy, you end up with an entirely new dog that just has the same genetic makeup. Little of an animal is entirely to do with the genes, because the second they put the cloned embryo into the mother dog it's going to have an entirely different environment.

Pretty much the only thing that's 100% going to be the same between your new dog and your old dog are the health issues that probably killed it in the first place.

Not that I'm against cloning! Cloning's super cool! It's just not good for that use.
11/17/2012
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by Rod Ronald
Recently a man had his blue tic hound who passed away cloned for $100,000. Would you ever spend that much money to have one of your beloved pets cloned. Or would you just realize it was only going to die again, making it that much harder?
Anyone with enough cash to do it is going to be sadly dissapointed. A clone may well not even have the same coloration or stature as the original pet. Many factors during the pregnancy effect those outcomes. More critically, however, a pet, like a human, is developed into who they are by every factor from the moment of their birth (and perhaps even sounds, chemicals and exposures in utero) and then every interaction with their siblings, parents and humans. Every exposure to sound, touch, the rain outside when they are four days old, to the fact that a child in the birth home held them on day ten. Everything shaped who their beloved pet was, and nothing, nothing, nothing about cloning creates a xerox copy of that. Thus their $100,000 "new" pet may be further from it's original "cell source" then some dog they adopt at the Humane Society or from any breeder!!

Worse yet, clones are not perfect "reproductions&qu ot;. In fact, cell lives have only so many divisional and repair cycles to their DNA structure and we have found clones have a huge number of genetic issues and defects that reflect the true "cell age" of the host provider. Thus "Dolly the Sheep", the famous first cloned mammal, had severe arthritis and a drastically less healthy and shorter life span then her "host cell" mother. In short, she started life as an "old sheep".

Cloning may have some useful real world applications, but there can be abuses and indeed, there is no question that even if the most pristine stem cells are used, clones are not carbon copies of the original animal, or human.
11/17/2012
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by potstickers
I wouldn't. It wouldn't be the same animal. It'd have a different personality and different color patterns. Even worse, it'd die early and have health problems due to its epigenetics being all wonky.
You are 100% correct.
11/17/2012
Bignuf Bignuf
Quote:
Originally posted by MissCandyland
Oh heck no. I had a cat for over 17 years and he passed away. I have a hard enough time seeing video and photos of him because it is just too hard.
That's a good point too. The cloned pet...even if a perfect clone, would not be the one who sat on your chest for 24 hours, that time you had the flu, or made you laugh by running through the sprinklers till he was soaked to the bone....etc.

What psychological confusion.
11/17/2012
tequilafish tequilafish
I feel that animals have distinct personalities, and I'm not a scientist but I think that even if you clone an animal, it doesn't mean it will end up having the same personality. I feel like it would be really frustrating to have new pet that looked the same as one I really loved, but doesn't act the same. Also, that's a lot of money, and even if it were the same it would die again, which would be even more painful.
11/17/2012
Zandrock Zandrock
No way
11/17/2012
RedKyuubi RedKyuubi
Nope
11/17/2012
Badass Badass
If I had the money to blow, I probably would.
11/17/2012
johnnyjohn johnnyjohn
That is just way to much money to through away in my opinion
11/17/2012
WhoopieDoo WhoopieDoo
I'd rather just have them live as long as me......no, I wouldn't clone them.
11/17/2012
TheirPet TheirPet
Even if you clone a pet it's not going to have the same personality. Just get another pet and enjoy them.
11/17/2012
sweetpea12 sweetpea12
Quote:
Originally posted by Rod Ronald
Recently a man had his blue tic hound who passed away cloned for $100,000. Would you ever spend that much money to have one of your beloved pets cloned. Or would you just realize it was only going to die again, making it that much harder?
No absolutely not
11/17/2012
Harpina is gone Harpina is gone
No, never.
11/17/2012
AwesomeAmanda AwesomeAmanda
I wouldn't do it because it is a waste of money.
11/17/2012
ViVix ViVix
Quote:
Originally posted by Rod Ronald
Recently a man had his blue tic hound who passed away cloned for $100,000. Would you ever spend that much money to have one of your beloved pets cloned. Or would you just realize it was only going to die again, making it that much harder?
I would do it for my mom. She has been mourning the passing of her beagle/german mix for a couple of years now.
11/17/2012
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Total posts: 51
Unique posters: 48