are jelly toys phthalate free?

Contributor: pleasurehunter pleasurehunter
Most of my toys are jelly, and a few rubber ones, the only time i get something plastic is if it says phthalate free, i was wondering, how safe are jelly/rubber toys in comparison, is there any dangerous i dont know about? Do they have phthalates if they do not say phthalates free? Thanks for anyone who can help me
10/31/2011
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Contributor: GingerAnn GingerAnn
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10/31/2011
Contributor: Rin (aka Nire) Rin (aka Nire)
Jelly, rubber, and PVC toys are all frequently made using pthalates to help soften them. If a toy has a very strong chemical or rubbery smell that won't wash away, even after a long time, pthalates are probably present. The same is true of toys of these materials that feel greasy to the touch - the greasiness is caused by pthalates leaking out. With these materials, it's best to assume that, unless they specifically state themselves to be pthalates-free, then the chemical in question is involved.

Basically, pthalates are a softening chemical that can cause unpleasant reactions in people who are susceptible to them. Anywhere from mild irritate to a full-blown yeast infection is possible. These can be avoided either by not using these materials, or by using condoms on them. Jelly, rubber, and PVC are also very porous, meaning that bacteria can hide in microscopic holes in the surface and be safe from cleaning (condoms can also help reduce bacterial buildup). Jelly, in addition, should generally not be kept for more than a year since it will begin breaking down more quickly than most other materials.

Hard plastic doesn't contain pthalates, so you don't need to worry about them even if the packaging doesn't mention it. The same is true of silicone, glass, metal, wood, ceramic, stone, cyberskin (though not all other skin-like products are pthalate-free), elastomer, and most TPR and TPR silicone products. And probably some others that I'm forgetting. These have varying levels of porousness, from none to a lot, but they're generally better for your body than jelly, rubber, and PVC.

The nice thing about Eden is that, as you browse, you can narrow down your options by size, color, material, etc. One of the options is to search for pthalate-free toys.
10/31/2011
Contributor: pleasurehunter pleasurehunter
Quote:
Originally posted by Rin (aka Nire)
Jelly, rubber, and PVC toys are all frequently made using pthalates to help soften them. If a toy has a very strong chemical or rubbery smell that won't wash away, even after a long time, pthalates are probably present. The same is true of toys ... more
Thank you a lot for taking the time to post that, it cleared up a lot of misconceived idea's, and questions I had. I appreciate it much )
11/01/2011
Contributor: Breas Breas
Quote:
Originally posted by Rin (aka Nire)
Jelly, rubber, and PVC toys are all frequently made using pthalates to help soften them. If a toy has a very strong chemical or rubbery smell that won't wash away, even after a long time, pthalates are probably present. The same is true of toys ... more
excellent response, very helpful!
11/01/2011
Contributor: Rin (aka Nire) Rin (aka Nire)
Quote:
Originally posted by pleasurehunter
Thank you a lot for taking the time to post that, it cleared up a lot of misconceived idea's, and questions I had. I appreciate it much )
You're very welcome. I'm happy I could help.
11/01/2011
Contributor: Jaimes Jaimes
A good, consistent manufacturer to check out is Doc Johnson. They still do jelly toys, which they make in house, and they are pthalate-free. Also, you'll be able to see immediately if an individual toy is pthalate-free by looking just to the right of the main picture, under "Materials and Safety Features".
11/01/2011
Contributor: ~LaUr3n~ ~LaUr3n~
Usually no. However, Doc Johnson has a line of jelly, pvc, rubber, and sil-a-gel toys that are.
11/01/2011
Contributor: candykiss34 candykiss34
Quote:
Originally posted by Rin (aka Nire)
Jelly, rubber, and PVC toys are all frequently made using pthalates to help soften them. If a toy has a very strong chemical or rubbery smell that won't wash away, even after a long time, pthalates are probably present. The same is true of toys ... more
Very helpful info! Thanks
02/15/2012