Adiana--Anyone had it done?

Adiana--Anyone had it done?

Lavender*Moon Lavender*Moon
Recently, I brought up the fact that my husband and I were looking into "permenent" birth control. As an O.R. nurse she comes across thing I have never heard of. She mentioned to me that there is this new kind of permentent birth control called "Adiana". I have gone online and looked it up as well as gotten information in the mail about it. Overall, it seems pretty good. However, I am always skeptical of any new medical procedure/medication.

So here's my question: Have any of you gotten this done? If so what was your experiance. Has anyone tried to have it done, but not been able to? Why?
09/05/2010
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Brian Brian
Quote:
Originally posted by Lavender*Moon
Recently, I brought up the fact that my husband and I were looking into "permenent" birth control. As an O.R. nurse she comes across thing I have never heard of. She mentioned to me that there is this new kind of permentent birth control ...
Is this where they put springs in that act the same as burning the fallopian tubes? We had a visit with my wifes OBGYN and she brought it up as we were asking all the alternatives to the BC pill. Didn't ask too much about it since we haven't had kids yet. She seemed to be ok with it since it's a less serious procedure than the old way of having to sedate the woman. I don't know your situation but I know a vasectomy for guys is still less of a procedure but as I guy I can see why we could chicken away from that
09/05/2010
Jenn (aka kissmykitty) Jenn (aka kissmykitty)
Adiana sounds interesting, but personally I think it also sounds a bit complicated. Are you interested in it because of not having to undergo actual surgery?

Re: springs - I had a tubal ligation using plastic spring-loaded clips four years ago, right after I had my son (via c-section, so it was very convenient and no great shakes for them to push aside my freshly sewn-up uterus to get at my fallopian tubes). It's considered permanent birth control, but it's also easily reversible. I've had no problems from it.
09/10/2010
Jesyra Jesyra
If you're looking for a non-surgical method of permanent contraception, take a look at Essure. It uses micro inserts placed in the fallopian tubes. I had this procedure done in 2004, 2 months after the birth of my 2nd child and I've had no issues, no pain, extra bleeding, nothing since I've had it done.

I spent a grand total of 2.5 hours from the doctor appt to schedule the procedure, to the 3 month follow up x-ray to ensure proper placement. Its a fast procedure all around and I went home and took care of my kids afterward, didn't need any help or recoup time. I experienced a normal peroid directly after insertion (4-5 days, mild-moderate cramps, moderately heavy flow - this is my norm) and haven't had to think about it again since the 3 month mark when I had a placement x-ray done (they do this to ensure it works!).

My cousin (just to contrast our experiences) had a tubal ligation after her 2nd child. She spent 3 days off of work, needed pain medication, and (I kid you not) bled heavy with massive cramps for 2 weeks straight. She hated life for a couple weeks after the tubal.

Adiana seems similiar to Essure but something I noticed was the fail rate for Adiana was 1.1%. Essure's is .26%, less than tubal ligation failure rates. Just something to be aware of. I would definately recommend a good micro insert over tubal ligation. With a quick look over the Adiana website though, I'd put Essure over Adiana.

Another point I noticed is that Adiana is made of silicone, Essure isn't.

If you're really concerned about micro inserts, ask for a patient advocate or something similiar and ASK for the horror stories, the serious problems that have been encountered by women due to the inserts. If its a decent company they should be able to tell you what serious problems have been encountered, if they hide it or "don't maintain records" on that I'd look for a different company.
09/10/2010
Pleasure Piratess Pleasure Piratess
Just a side note... while this and the standard way of severing the fallopian tubes are considered to be reversible, there is always a risk that the scarring from the procedure would prevent regular conception, so be sure you are done having kids before having it or any other procedure done.
For a reversible longterm solution, have you given any thought to IUD's or Mirena? Pretty affordable, last 5 or more years, no periods, that warrants saying again, no periods....
09/10/2010
Lavender*Moon Lavender*Moon
Thanks for all the great input. Recently I found out I was pregnant again. So, now that I'm over the state's required age of....I don't know...consent(?), I should be able to get a tubal no problem. Here, if your under 25 you have to sign all these papers stating that you understand what your asking for, that you want the procedure done, etc. and for most insurances this has to be done by your 6th month in order for them to approve it. Now, I just have to ask for it to be done (Yeah!) and it should be easy for the Dr. since I already know I have to have another C-section.

Again thanks for the input!
09/26/2010
UrNaughtyaAngel UrNaughtyaAngel
I have never heard of it. But thanks to you all for what you have said very interesting and informative
10/03/2010
Total posts: 7
Unique posters: 6