Need help with research on "pheronomes" and "aphrodisiacs" - help?

Need help with research on "pheronomes" and "aphrodisiacs" - help?

Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
I'm getting ready to review several products from different manufacturers that claim to have "aphrodisiacs" or "pheronomes" in them. As many of you who read my bath/beauty reviews may know, I tend to put some research into them so I can help people understand more about why products are in them or why they're labeled "cream" vs. "body butter", etc.

It's really fun to do.

But I feel like I'm banging my head against a brick wall as I try to work on researching both aphrodisiacs and pheronomes. Companies say that research shows them that certain products (ingredients?) have these properties yet I find very little on the internet to support that. I've gone to the FDA website even to get more information.

I have to say that it almost feels like a "hoax". I understand that scents can bring out memories, etc. that may create a more sensual experience for us.

But I'd like to find some studies that actually PROVE something.

Does anyone know of a site I might have missed? I'd share my links here - but I probably have about 20 of them to sort through to tell you which ones are the most helpful.
02/09/2012
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Cookie Monster Mike Cookie Monster Mike
Quote:
Originally posted by Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
I'm getting ready to review several products from different manufacturers that claim to have "aphrodisiacs" or "pheronomes" in them. As many of you who read my bath/beauty reviews may know, I tend to put some research into ...
The only thing I can understand on the subject of aphrodisiacs is that as long as the scent can aid in the increase of sexual desire etc then it's considered an aphrodisiac. I did a little research on the subject myself and there is hardly any actually scientific data I could find that shows the increased desire. I think personally it plays a part in the emotions and brain.

When I smell my mangosteen body polish, I don't get aroused really by it, but it just make me feel good smelling it. I'm sure that using it on my partner would increase my desire, but mostly because of the act of doing that together would get us in the mood.

I hope you can find some more solid information on it.
02/09/2012
Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Quote:
Originally posted by Cookie Monster Mike
The only thing I can understand on the subject of aphrodisiacs is that as long as the scent can aid in the increase of sexual desire etc then it's considered an aphrodisiac. I did a little research on the subject myself and there is hardly any ...


I'm going back to

I think this is something I really want to address in these reviews...because I think people can get caught up in the hype (especially newbies) and then kick themselves when something doesn't work.
02/09/2012
Kindred Kindred
Quote:
Originally posted by Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama


I'm going back to

I think this is something I really want to address in these reviews...because I think people can get caught up in the hype (especially newbies) and then kick themselves when something doesn't work. ...
I reviewed a product that contained pheromones. Here is the article I cited: link. I'm happy to discuss the science if there is anything you do not understand.

Also, that site (Pubmed) is an excellent resource for scientific literature.
02/09/2012
unfulfilled unfulfilled
Thanks Kindred for the link. My massage oil claimed it had aphrodisiac properties in it and all of the natural ingredients weren't.
02/09/2012
Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Quote:
Originally posted by unfulfilled
Thanks Kindred for the link. My massage oil claimed it had aphrodisiac properties in it and all of the natural ingredients weren't.
Actually - according to DONA's product information - it did. They consider Acai to be an aphrodisiac:

Acai: a berry that comes from the Amazon; contains anthocyanin which is an antioxidant known to reduce cholesterol and has the potential to prevent blood clots (acai has ten times the antioxidant potency of red wine); one of its most notable effects on the body is a marked increase in stamina.

I actually have like four pages (or more?) of information from the company.
02/09/2012
Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Ok - for Kindred and others - here are my questions.

According to the company and the paperwork they sent me, they state that scents can act as aphrodisiacs as well as foods that you eat.

I'm going to quote part of their information here:

Part one:

What is an aphrodisiac?
Elements that evoke or stimulate sexual desire

Why does our concept work?

A common misconception is that aphrodisiacs can only be ingested. This, however, isn’t the case—effects from aphrodisiacs can also be achieved through inhalation or absorption. And, as the skin is the body’s largest organ, DONA is a very all-encompassing way to experience aphrodisiacs. Each of the products in our DONA line help facilitate absorbing the aphrodisiacs into skin through luxurious, pampering ways.
02/09/2012
Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Part two:

What are the aphrodisiacs?

A. Acai: a berry that comes from the Amazon; contains anthocyanin which is an antioxidant known to reduce cholesterol and has the potential to revent blood clots (acai has ten times the antioxidant potency of red wine); one of its most notable effects on the body is a marked increase in stamina

B. Blue Lotus: an Egyptian water lily known to provide a relaxing, euphoric
sensation and bring heightened awareness and tranquility; it is said to
strengthen the bond between couples

C. Camu Camu: a fruit found in the South American rainforest known to be a rejuvenator; contains has more natural Vitamin C than any other known botanical on the planet = camu camu is energizing, mood-lifting, and strengthens immune system

D. Goji Berry: a berry that is native to China and contains an exceptional level of vitamin C (among the highest level contained in natural plants);
enhances both male and female libidos; as people age, their testosterone
levels drop, reducing sex drive; intake of goji berry increases levels of
testosterone

E. Mangosteen: a fruit believed to have originated in Indonesia; rich in
fiber, protein, calcium, potassium, and vitamins; a powerful anti-oxidant that has anti-inflammatory properties and helps stimulate vitality and mood

F. Pomegranate: a fruit native to Iran; sometimes known as the “forbidden
fruit” in the Bible because of its strong sexual stimulation; contains a lot of antioxidants that keep the skin young and give you energy and vibrancy
02/09/2012
Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Now here is my concern/questions.

I'm going to be writing several reviews about products that claim to have either aphrodisiacs or pheronomes in them. (I'm writing about more than just the Dona line).

I don't want to claim this if there is no proof that aphrodisiacs exist.

I can buy into the whole "scents can affect our moods/desire to have sex or feel good about ourself". That I get and I understand and agree with.

But I would like to see some sort of a clinical study in "easy-to-understand" English that says "Yes..this works".

I am currently wearing three of the Dona products (sorta). I used the body wash and the scrub and then the body mist lotion once I came out of the shower. It smells great (the mangosteen scent).

My husband may come in the house and give me a kiss and think I smell wonderful and want to take me off to bed. Then again - he could come in the house - smell I've been making coffee or some sort of lunch he loves - and want to take me off to bed for that too.

How do I know that some sort of scent/"aphrodisiac" or "pheremone" makes the difference?
02/09/2012
CreamySweet CreamySweet
Quote:
Originally posted by Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
I'm getting ready to review several products from different manufacturers that claim to have "aphrodisiacs" or "pheronomes" in them. As many of you who read my bath/beauty reviews may know, I tend to put some research into ...
I have used one that passion parties sells... I don't know that it makes a difference to others but maybe to you (the wearer) it has a placebo effect of making you be more outgoing and self confident to present a sexual demeanor. I am currently trying a product called "Steel Labido" to see if it increases my sex drive and desire but no official opinion yet... I really think that a lot of these products are based on the placebo effect more then on actual mechanism or action. That said the human brain can be very complex obviously and also very manipulated. Certain foods will triger certain psyc responses and physical effects on the body as will certain smells or ingestion of certain medications. The brain can't really distinguish reality from fantasy or opinion - it only basis its response on sensory inputs. A combat tactics class I took once presented this concept for agressiveness and survival. Initially I didn't buy it but the instructor went on to explain this concept by the following statement. "Have you ever been to a movie? Have you ever jumped from your seat? Cried? Gotten angry at the movie or someone in it? Why? They are just paid actors and none of that is real. Your mind only believes it to be. The same happens when your hand goes in a pail of water with a medical glove and your hand feels wet. But when you take off the glove its dry. Simple sensory maniplulation that tricks your brain into false reality". He was very correct. Thats why porno movies make most folks horny or want sex. It doesnt matter that those are actors fucking. The natural and unnatural products will stimulate parts of your brain into feed and breed mode more then fight or flight but the rest of the total effect and if you respond to it is in your head. Good luck and let me know! I would love to get the subtle jedi like mind powers to drop boxers and panties with a slight wiff of come-do-me spray. Xox
02/09/2012
El-Jaro El-Jaro
I just did a review last night on a pheromone product. After some research and my own experience, I'm chalking them all up to You Results May Vary (YRMV).

Smells effect different people different ways. I wouldn't call the whole thing a sham though.
02/09/2012
P'Gell P'Gell
AFAIK, according to the FDA, there is really nothing that qualifies as an "aphrodisiac." Not even Viagra and other erection meds. These don't increase desire or cause desire, only help with erection once a man is already interested, and they don't work well on women. (I've even taken Viagra, along with my husband, and despite having a high sex drive, the results concerning orgasm it had on me were negligible, as they are on most women.)

I think testosterone, actual pharmaceutical testosterone qualifies as a real "aphrodisiac" but aside from that, there is little that does.

What I'm saying is, you're not going to find much of anything in the well researched, evidence based, unbiased literature that definitively proves anything is a true aphrodisiac.
02/09/2012
Kindred Kindred
Quote:
Originally posted by Hot 'N Sexy TexasMama
Now here is my concern/questions.

I'm going to be writing several reviews about products that claim to have either aphrodisiacs or pheronomes in them. (I'm writing about more than just the Dona line).

I don't want to claim ...
There is no definitive, scientific evidence that aphrodisiacs work. The study I cited on androstenol is the closest you will find where the authors demonstrated that exposure to pheromones stimulated areas of the brain associated with mating behavior. However, that does not demonstrate that the subject was aroused. The problem is that there is no measurable quantity to say that someone is aroused. You can't simply say that because an area of the brain is stimulated that a person is aroused. Arousal is much more complicated than that.

My suggestion is that you can mention in your review the companies claims but give a disclaimer stating that none of this is substantiated by scientific evidence and results may vary between individuals. I think that you could also discuss the placebo effect as that likely also plays a role. I would give your honest opinion based on the amount of information you have on the subject. That's all you can really do in this case.

I am a little skeptical of some of the claims the company is making, particularly the comment about absorbing aphrodisiacs through the skin. The skin is designed as a defensive barrier to keep things out. It does not readily absorb everything or else we would absorb any toxic substance we touch, which is clearly not the case. With most topical drugs, a chemical is added to help with absorption. I would have to look up all of the ingredients to see if the product contains such a chemical.
02/10/2012
Cookie Monster Mike Cookie Monster Mike
Quote:
Originally posted by Kindred
There is no definitive, scientific evidence that aphrodisiacs work. The study I cited on androstenol is the closest you will find where the authors demonstrated that exposure to pheromones stimulated areas of the brain associated with mating ...
I think if any absorption is going to occur it would only be upon the surface layers of the skin. However I have seen some research that shows many cosmetics, beauty products do actually get absorbed through the skin (over time) and actually end up in the blood stream. I don't have the exact source on that right this second, but I'm sure this is limited to certain ingredients and certain periods of time.

Eh overall it's hard to tell fact on the internet, anyone can say anything and make it sound believable. My personal belief is that the skin absorbs a lot of things, but also repels as well. It is definitely capable of topical absorption. Now we just need research on these supposed aphrodisiacs! While the skin absorbs many things, it repels many others. Even if our skin were to absorb an aphrodisiac such as the ones in the Dona product line, I really don't see what it is going to do other than make the skin smell good? I think it's definitely a part of their marketing strategy, so that customers who have little or no knowledge about this stuff will jump all over it. Just like companies that slap "organic" or "super fruit", "anti-oxidant rich" etc all over their products. When in reality unless its all natural and in concentrated form it's really not going to benefit you much.

What I don't understand is that the Dona line is cheap enough as it is, seriously most of it is around $10 each but yet they are slapping all these things on to market it more. Okay so I'm going off-topic here haha. On my final thoughts, I don't see any exact evidence of something being an aphrodisiac that will increase sexual desire. I can only see these scents being very yummy and pleasant that might help facilitate you getting in the mood for some naughty fun.
02/10/2012
Kindred Kindred
Quote:
Originally posted by Cookie Monster Mike
I think if any absorption is going to occur it would only be upon the surface layers of the skin. However I have seen some research that shows many cosmetics, beauty products do actually get absorbed through the skin (over time) and actually end up ...
I agree that there is a difference between being absorbed "into" the skin and "through" the skin. My intent was that most molecules do not get absorbed through the skin. To me, arousal is a complicated mental state that can't simply be defined by measurable parameters. Hormonal levels and physiologic responses are part of it but not the complete picture. An erection alone does not indicate that a man is aroused.

Also, this is outside my realm of expertise, but the issue you mention about cosmetics being measured in the bloodstream may be nanoparticles. Cosmetic companies are now using nanotechnology in products, which are extremely tiny particles (smaller than most cells) and can pass into the bloodstream. I don't think long term effects are known, but there is obvious concern. Sunscreens are one cosmetic I know that nanoparticles have been used in.
02/10/2012
Cookie Monster Mike Cookie Monster Mike
Quote:
Originally posted by Kindred
I agree that there is a difference between being absorbed "into" the skin and "through" the skin. My intent was that most molecules do not get absorbed through the skin. To me, arousal is a complicated mental state that ...
Ooo I didn't know that at all. Yeah I vaguely remember they didn't go into details about what exactly was going into the blood stream. Probably not a legit source of information lol.

I do completely agree that the arousal is pretty much a mental state that can't really be measured. I can say that no food or scent/aroma has really even "aroused" me in a sexual way. But maybe aroused my excitement levels? I think overall I gave up a long time trying to determine what is good and bad for the body. It seems everything we think is good now will eventually be ruled out as bad in 10 years and cancer causing etc.
02/10/2012
wrecklesswords wrecklesswords
I'm going to have to agree that I think everyone's results will be different. That's one thing that I think was good about when I was selling Pure Romance and it came to the product Pure Instinct. It was a little roller tube of artificial pheromones. It has an initial fruity/floral scent, but when put on different people, it alters itself a little and smells different on every person.

Aphrodisiacs and pheromone sprays/perfumes/washes /whatever may just be one of those things that are hard to 100% pin down because they can effect every person differently. Then again, I suppose that could be said for any kind of medication that's out there on the market.

However, if you do find something that's a little more in the hard fact area, that would be awesome to read about.
02/10/2012
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